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July 17, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

This District nonprofit wants to make homeownership a reality for residents east of the river

HOUSING
– As the cost of living has risen in the District and gentrification has become the norm, homeownership has become a distant dream for many of the city’s residents. Lydia’s House, a nonprofit that offers guidance to first-time, low- and moderate-income home buyers, is trying to change that. (WaPo, 7/16)

With home prices across the city continuing to rise, east-of-the-river neighborhoods such as Anacostia and Congress Heights, which the District housing boom had largely passed over, are becoming increasingly desirable — and expensive.

As more investors and homeowners look east in the hopes of riding the wave of development, there are also worries that residents will be priced out of what has historically been a low- and moderate-income part of the city, forced to move further out, beyond the boundaries of the District. Homeownership can provide a needed hedge against skyrocketing rents.

What Are DC Residents Spending More Money On? Housing, Health Care and Restaurants (DCFPI, 7/14)

EDUCATION | District officials have announced that the city will offer scholarships to day care providers to help them get a post-secondary degree. (WAMU, 7/14)

HEALTH
– A group of studies have found that the stress of poverty and racism increases the risk of dementia for African-Americans. (WaPo, 7/16)

– What The ‘Crack Baby’ Panic Reveals About The Opioid Epidemic (Atlantic, 7/16)

POVERTY | A Virginia lawmaker has proposed legislation that would exempt workers and companies in the state’s poorest localities from income taxes for 10 years. (Richmond Times, 7/13)

ARLINGTON COUNTYNo Longer A County Boy: Arlington Official Says County Should Become A City (WAMU, 7/14)

ENVIRONMENT | A new study on the impact of rising sea levels on coastal regions in the US lays out a timeline for Maryland and Virginia. (WaPo, 7/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Executive Director | Agua Fund
Database Assistant | Greater Washington Community Foundation
Senior Administrative Assistant/Foundation Coordinator | The Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation, the Nancy Peery Marriott Foundation and the Marriott Daughters Foundation
Program Officer | The Diane & Bruce Halle Foundation
Program Officer | Howard and Geraldine Polinger Family Foundation
Development Coordinator | Girls on the Run – DC
Senior Program Officer | George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation
Corporate Gifts Officer | FIRST Chesapeake
Officer, Philanthropic Networks, Philanthropic Partnerships | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Program Manager: Thriving Germantown Community HUB-Germantown, MD | Family Services, Inc.

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


The Daily will be on break until July 25th!

Here are ten ways to celebrate National Peach Ice Cream Day!

– Kendra

July 14, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

How do we make cultural philanthropy more equitable?

ARTS & HUMANITIES | The Helicon Collaborative has released a study, Not Just Money: Equity Issues in Cultural Philanthropy, that explores inequities in arts funding in the US. Among the chief findings, the study found that, although foundations have made efforts to be diverse and inclusive, funding overall has gotten less equitable. (Medium, 7/10)

In spite of this increased attention and activity, the distribution of arts funding nationally is actually getting more concentrated in the hands of the institutions that already have the most resources.

The 2 percent cohort is made up of 925 cultural groups that have annual budgets of more than $5 million. (NCCS) These organizations are symphonies, opera companies, regional theaters, art museums, ballet companies and other large institutions — the majority of which focus primarily on Western European fine arts traditions. While most of these institutions have made sincere efforts to broaden participation in the past decade, their audiences remain predominantly white and upper income. (NEA Research Report #57)

HEALTH
– These nurse practitioners have set up health clinics to care for low-income populations in three counties in Northern Virginia. (InsideNOVA, 7/14)

– ‘We’re losing more people to the sweets than to the streets’: Why two black pastors are suing Coca-Cola (WaPo, 7/13)

HUMAN RIGHTS | Tonight, activists will march in the District to push the city to do more to end violence against transgender woman, especially those of color. (DCist, 7/13)

ECONOMY | Loudoun County has been named the richest county in the United States again. (Loudoun Times, 7/13)

Related: The Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties recently launched the Faces of Loudoun, a campaign that features the stories of real Loudoun residents who’ve struggled with the lack of basic resources.

REPRESENTATION | The DC Council is working to give DC Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton a vote in the House of Representatives on District matters only. (Current, 7/12)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Executive Director | Agua Fund – New!
Database Assistant | Greater Washington Community Foundation – New!
Senior Administrative Assistant/Foundation Coordinator | The Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation, the Nancy Peery Marriott Foundation and the Marriott Daughters Foundation – New!
Program Officer | The Diane & Bruce Halle Foundation
Program Officer | Howard and Geraldine Polinger Family Foundation
Development Coordinator | Girls on the Run – DC
Senior Program Officer | George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation
Corporate Gifts Officer | FIRST Chesapeake
Officer, Philanthropic Networks, Philanthropic Partnerships | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Program Manager: Thriving Germantown Community HUB-Germantown, MD | Family Services, Inc.

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Krispy Kreme is celebrating its 80th birthday with $0.80 donuts.

– Kendra

July 13, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

How can philanthropy really help vulnerable populations?

PHILANTHROPY
– Amazon founder Jeff Bezos recently announced he would practice more charitable giving. His approach, giving money to charities that directly help people now instead of investing in long term impact, has caused a renewed conversation on the work and practice of philanthropy. (Chronicle, 6/15)

Gretchen Greiner-Lott, vice president of WRAG, says:

At the end of June, Jeff Bezos sent a tweet to the universe asking for advice on how he should design his philanthropy. This story was covered by the Washington Post and the Chronicle of Philanthropy responded, as well. The story even prompted a response from Wilt Corkern of the Corina Higginson Trust and WRAG Board member. What do you think? (WaPo, 7/7)

EDUCATION
– After analyzing the low college graduation rates of DC high school graduates, the DC State Board of Education plans to review graduation requirements to determine whether changes are needed. (WaPo, 7/12)

– DC’s new education chancellor, Antwan Wilson, reflects on the progress and failures he’s seen during his first year. (GGWash, 7/12)

FOOD INSECURITYSchool Cafeterias Ramp Up Efforts to Feed Loudoun Kids Through the Summer (Loudoun Now, 7/12)

CHILDREN | To reduce the District’s infant mortality rate, the DC Council has introduced a new bill that would provide new parents with a “baby box” and educational resources to encourage safe sleeping practices. (DCist, 7/12)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | How the Anacostia Arts Center became a project by and for the community. (DC Music Download, 7/12)


How easily we blend into the environment.

– Kendra

July 12, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Homelessness could become a protected class in the District

HOMELESSNESS
–  Almost 7,500 people were classified as homeless in the District as of January 2017. Due to the significant barriers the homeless population face in employment, housing, and other areas, a DC Council member has introduced a bill that would make being homeless a protected class under the D.C. Human Rights Act.  (WCP, 7/11)

The legislation would simply add homelessness to the law’s list of almost 20 protected traits and allow the homeless to bring legal complaints with the District, possibly resulting in civil penalties, compensatory damages, or reinstatement of jobs. Typically, homelessness is defined in D.C. as not having a “fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence,” including those sleeping on the streets, in cars, and in shelters. The council is also considering sweeping changes to its primary homeless services law, which officials say would bring D.C.’s definition of homelessness in line with federal guidelines.

Without Leadership at HUD, DC’s Anti-Homelessness Officials Have No Idea What’s Coming (Washingtonian, 6/29)

CHILDREN | A Maryland candidate for governor has proposed lending money to working families to assist in their childcare costs. (Baltimore Sun, 7/12)

DISCRIMINATION | Last year, Montgomery County, MD saw a surge in hate-based incidents in its school system. (WaPo, 7/11)

ECONOMY
– A new George Mason University study ranks the fiscal health of Virginia and Maryland. (WBJ, 7/11)

– The District’s latest minimum wage increase to $12.50 went into effect on July 1. (DCFPI, 7/11)

HOUSINGBlack Homeowners Struggle as Housing Market Recovers (NBC News, 7/10)

GOVERNMENT | The District government is hosting a workshop on July 22 to hear resident feedback on various government forms including drivers license forms. More information here


Giant bowls you can relax in will come to Arlington soon.

– Kendra

July 11, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Medicaid cuts will unfairly impact individuals with disabilities

HEALTH CARE | This week the Senate will continues its efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act with the Better Care Reconciliation Act, which includes major cuts to Medicaid. Individuals that would be impacted have been protesting at the Capitol, including those with disabilities. (Atlantic, 7/10)

Right now, more than 80 percent of Medicaid’s budget funds health care for the disabled, elderly, and children. The plan “fundamentally changes Medicaid in a way that hasn’t been done before,” said MaryBeth Musumeci, a Medicaid expert at Kaiser Family Foundation. The Senate bill would reduce Medicaid’s budget by a projected 35 percent over the next two decades, compared to current policy, and because so much of its budget already goes to the neediest Americans, Musumeci said it would have “profound implications for all beneficiaries.”

Some services, like hospital care and nursing homes, are mandated under federal law and can’t be cut. But advocates warn that because other services that are essential to disabled people are technically optional, they could be the first on the chopping block.

NONPROFIT
– A new report, Working at the Intersections: LGBTQ Nonprofit Staff and the Racial Leadership Gap, explores how the nonprofit sector can address the structural barriers to leadership based on race and identity. (Race to Lead, 7/11)

– Why Charities Shouldn’t Start Ignoring the Ban on Partisan Politicking (Chronicle, 7/11 – Subscription needed)

PHILANTHROPY
– The Greater Washington Community Foundation (formerly the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region) has launched Voices of the Community (VoicesDMV), a new initiative designed to learn about the challenges and opportunities facing residents in the region. More information here.

Public Welfare Foundation has selected Candice C. Jones as the Foundation’s next president and CEO. (PWF, 7/10)

HOMELESSNESS | Advocates and others came together to discuss how best to address the criminalization of the homeless population at a national forum last week. (Street Sense, 7/10)

PUBLIC SAFETY | A transgender woman was intentionally hit by a car in the District last week. (Blade, 7/8)

HOUSING | Residents of a Manassas, VA mobile park anxiously await a decision on whether they can can stay on their land or if the city will buy it. (InsideNOVA, 7/10)


The District’s Fringe Festival is here.

– Kendra 

July 10, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

The demolition of the District’s Barry Farm housing project is near

HOUSING | The DC Council approved the redevelopment of the Barry Farm housing project in 2006 under the New Communities Initiative, a program designed to revitalize “severely distressed” subsidized housing and redevelop communities plagued with concentrated poverty. Although residents have organized to stop their displacement during and after construction, the demolition is near and residents are frustrated with the developer and the DC Housing Authority’s policies. (WaPo, 7/8)

Management of the new complex will be overseen by one or both of the developers that have partnered with the Housing Authority. To dispel concern that the new manager might impose a tighter screening process for returning residents, in terms of their credit and rent-paying histories and any past legal problems, the authority has enacted a rule that the process cannot be any stricter than the current one for public housing.

King, the authority’s development officer, said the rebuilt complex will have 1,400 units, including 344 for public housing tenants. An additional 100 public housing apartments already have opened, and are occupied, at two new complexes nearby. The rest of the redevelopment, more than 1,000 residences, will be a mix of nonpublic apartments for low-income tenants and market-rate rental and ownership units.

RACISM | Tamara Copeland, WRAG’s president, has taken some time from her sabbatical to thank a longtime actress for calling out a racist incident she witnessed in Lucca, Italy, where Tamara is also visiting. (Daily, 7/10)

PHILANTHROPY | Yanique Redwood, vice chair of WRAG’s board and president and CEO of Consumer Health Foundation, discusses why her foundation has decided to require prospective grantees to complete a racial equity impact assessment tool with their grant application. (CHF Blog, 7/6)

RFP | The Loudoun Impact Fund, a Community Foundation for Northern Virginia and the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties initiative, is accepting applications for its 2017 grants cycle. Organizations supporting youth and elderly welfare in Loudoun County are invited to apply by September 13, 2017. More information here

EDUCATION
– Instead of worrying about financing scholarships every year, what if foundations found a new way to help low-income and middle class students? (Chronicle, 7/7 – Subscription needed)

– DC, Maryland and Virginia have joined sixteen other states in filing a lawsuit against the secretary of education for delaying a rule that helps former students of predatory colleges seek debt forgiveness. (DCist, 7/7)

BUSINESS
– A DC council member has proposed a bill that would create a grant program to provide rental assistance to longtime small businesses within the District’s Department of Small and Local Business Development. (AFRO, 7/6)

Amazon Was Supposed To Have Crushed Bookstores. So Why Are Indie Bookshops Booming In D.C.? (WAMU, 7/6)


Cricket is coming to Northern Virginia.

– Kendra

July 10, 2017 / WRAG

Racism isn’t just in America: Three Degrees of Separation in Italy

By Tamara Lucas Copeland
President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

Some of you may remember the name Lucy Lawless. She played Xena: Warrior Princess in the late ‘90s, early 2000s and more recently had a recurring role in the TV show Parks and Recreation. I have to admit that while I had heard of both shows, I wasn’t a regular fan of either and didn’t know the name Lucy Lawless, but a few days ago our paths crossed geographically and philosophically.

Lucy Lawless and I are both in Lucca, Italy, a city in Tuscany about an hour south of Florence. I suspect that we are both here for the same reasons: rest, relaxation and renewal in a city known for its beauty. One of the charms of Lucca is its medieval walled city full of interesting shops, great food, beautiful churches and magnificent public art. Having been to Italy a couple of times before, on this trip, I noticed the large number of black and brown people in all of the cities where I have been traveling. On a very superficial level — simply watching racially mixed families, what seemed to be friendship groups and business colleagues — it seemed that they were blending fully into the Italian culture. Lawless witnessed something else that she captured and posted on her Facebook page.

The phrase “if you see something, say something” doesn’t just apply to political terrorism. It is just as apt for psychological/social terrorism. So, from me to @RealLucyLawless thank you for using your voice and for #PuttingRacismOnTheTable and to the GenXer who is part of my traveling group for being woke and alerting me to the Lawless Facebook post.

*ragazzi is an Italian word for young males.