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September 22, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Recent DC job fair offered mock interviews as well as business clothes

WORKFORCE | At the DC Opportunity Fair, which featured employers such as Hilton, Nordstrom, FedEx and U.S. Postal Service, young people who are unemployed or underemployed were offered interview advice, business casual clothes and employment. (WaPo, 9/22)

“Hopefully, I can find a company here that I can grow with,” said 24-year-old, bow-tie-wearing Markiel Jones, who is unemployed after dropping out of college for financial reasons.

The Prince George’s County resident graduated from high school and went on to attend the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. After low-paying jobs in the food-service industry that showed little promise for growth, he landed a Starbucks job offer and learned about the company’s tuition assistance for employees seeking a higher education.

HUMAN RIGHTS
– DC has a large deaf community but many of the city’s practices, polices, and even sidewalks are not deaf-friendly. (Urban Turf, 9/21)

– Why It Looks Like Discrimination Cases In D.C. Are Down By More Than 60 Percent (DCist, 9/21)

HEALTH CARE | Virginia, as well as other states, anxiously wait to hear if Congress will reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program by September 30. (Richmond Times, 9/21)

ARTS & HUMANITIESAs The African American History Museum Turns One, Director Lonnie Bunch Looks Back (DCist, 9/21)

LGBTQ/AGING | DC’s Office on Aging will be hosting a townhall for LGBTQ individuals next Tuesday to learn how it can better help the population. (Washington Blade, 9/19)

PUBLIC SAFETY | Opinion: The District is the most policed place in the US, so why do officials keep calling for more cops? (WCP, 9/21)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Sr. Manager, Corporate Relations | Exelon  – New!
Program Coordinator | Exponent Philanthropy  – New!
Content Manager | Exponent Philanthropy  – New!
Director of Development | The Literacy Lab  – New!
Communications Manager | United Philanthropy Forum
Senior Program Associate, Engaged Practice Division, Healthcare Engagement Program | The Democracy Collaborative
Program Associate, Portfolio Support, Public and Patient Engagement | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Program Associate, Public and Patient Engagement | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Program Officer, Public Engagement | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Program Coordinator | Exponent Philanthropy

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Please don’t disappoint the pink cube.

– Kendra

September 21, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Capital Area Food Bank prioritizes healthy food options

FOOD INSECURITY | Recipients of the Capital Area Food Bank, one of the largest food banks in the US, asked the organization to provide food options with less salt and sugar. It listened and has been able to reduce the junk food it supplies by 84%. (WAMU, 9/18)

A leader in the movement toward nourishing food assistance, CAFB hasn’t just cut back on sugary snacks and drinks in the last year. Since 2015, it’s also boosted the amount of protein it offers — including 544,000 more pounds of beans and other vegetarian protein. That’s an increase of 57 percent.

“I used to get a bin of candy from the CAFB. Since they made this decision, I haven’t been getting that anymore,” says Jasmine Ramsay of the Pennsylvania Avenue Seventh Day Adventist Church, one of the food bank’s partners. “The CAFB has made me realize how important it is to give not just bags of food, but nutritious food.”

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AWARDS | Congratulations to the following WRAG members on being finalists in the 2017 Corporate Citizenship Awards!

Best Corporate Steward, Large Business

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Best Commitment to Education Program

IBM

Best Economic Empowerment Program

Citi Foundation

JP Morgan Chase

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | A new analysis by the National Equity Atlas found that if rent was affordable, the average household would save $6,200 a year. (Citylab, 9/20)

HOMELESSNESSBill Tightening Eligibility Requirements For Homeless Seeking Shelter Stalls In D.C. Council (WAMU, 9/20)

EDUCATION | Scott Brabrand, Fairfax County’s new schools chief, discusses his plans for the school district, including creating a more diverse workforce. (WaPo, 9/20)

RACIAL EQUITY
– The DC Policy Center analyzed the Greater Washington region’s Hispanic population and wonders what is driving the segregation it sees. (DC Policy Center, 9/21)

– Racial Discrimination Tops List of Causes Millennials Care Most About, Study Finds (Chronicle, 9/20 – Subscription needed)

TRANSPORTATION| The Greater Washington Partnership, a coalition of top executives from the area, will focus on finding solutions to transportation and job creation in the region. (Baltimore Sun, 9/21)

NONPROFITS/LOI | Many Hands is now accepting applications for its 2018 grants.


A Motown tribute to Nickelback

– Kendra

September 20, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

A new guide to increasing the health of District residents

HEALTH |  District Mayor Muriel Bowser recently released the city’s Health Systems Plan, which is a guide to help promote the health and well-being of residents. It also helps the city decide where to focus resources in healthcare systems. (WaPo, 9/19)

The District’s poorest residents are still forced to travel far outside their neighborhoods for their health care, according to a report released Tuesday by Mayor Muriel E. Bowser.

Less than 25 percent of Medicaid patients living east of the Anacostia River see a primary-care doctor in their Zip code. Despite efforts to expand services in Wards 7 and 8, many still call 911 emergency services for their basic health needs. And residents needing specialty care must commute downtown where most of the medical specialists are clustered.

YOUTH/CRIMINAL JUSTICE | After a Washington Post investigation into the District’s Youth Rehabilitation Act, changes have been proposed to the law. (WaPo, 9/18)

WORKFORCEThere’s An Under-The-Radar Fight Going On In D.C. Over How Much Restaurant Workers Should Be Paid (WAMU, 9/19)

PHILANTHROPY | A new report by Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors analyzing how funders can support transformative change to social problems, found that providing multi-year, unrestricted funding to grantees will help them stay focused on their mission. (Chronicle, 9/19 – Subscription needed)

IMMIGRATION | The Arlington County Board has granted $100,000 to Legal Aid Justice Center to fund emergency immigration legal aid services for undocumented immigrants, mixed status families, and refugees. (DCist, 9/19)

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | Montgomery County is planning to open a secure visitation and exchange center so that ex-partners who may have protective orders can safely leave their children for visits. (Bethesda Beat, 9/18)

HOUSING/EQUITY
– Housing inequity persists in Fairfax County, VA. According to a new report, there’s two different housing markets in the region: one for black buyers and renters and one for everyone else. (WTOP, 9/19)

– Inclusionary Zoning Will Only Get Better Thanks to Administrative Fixes (DCFPI, 9/19)


The DC Chinese Film Festival starts this week!

– Kendra

September 15, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Maryland is one of 16 states where food insecurity has declined significantly

FOOD INSECURITY | A recent US Department of Agriculture report found that Maryland’s food insecurity rate declined to 10.1% in 2016 (down from 13.3% in 2013). Anti-hunger advocates welcomed the news but still say there’s more work to do with the families that are still unable to access food. (Baltimore Sun, 9/8)

“There are a lot of organizations successfully trying to help people facing hunger and poverty,” said Michael J. Wilson, director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, a nonprofit established to fight hunger and improve the nutrition, health and well-being of children and families. “But these are still challenging times for a lot of people. We will take the good news where we can find it, but the challenge is how can we continue to make progress.”

Wilson attributed the decline in food insecurity in part to a drop in the unemployment rate. State lawmakers recently approved legislation allowing non-violent drug offenders once prohibited from participating in the federal food stamp program to qualify for benefits upon leaving prison.

PUBLIC SAFETY
– Both the mayor and DC Council are preparing to introduce bills that make it easier for people with criminal records to have their records sealed. (WAMU, 9/14)

– U.S. Army kills contracts for hundreds of immigrant recruits. Some face deportation. (WaPo, 9/15)

EDUCATION | Jane Dimyan-Ehrenfeld, executive director of the Center for Inspired Teaching, urges teachers and education professionals to change the way children are motivated in school. (WaPo, 9/14)

Related: Funders, join us on September 28 for the third program in WRAG’s 2017 Public Education Learning Series: “Curriculum: The Missing Ingredient in Education Reform” Register here

WORKFORCE
– Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett has proposed several changes to the county’s proposed minimum wage bill, including delaying when employers would start paying their employees $15/hr. (Bethesda Beat, 9/14)

– Rise of the robots: Why Greater Washington’s workers are safer than most (WBJ, 9/14)

TRANSIT | Commuters, it actually does take us more than a week to get to and from work. (WaPo, 9/15)

HEALTHReport: Sewage leaks, other mishaps bring MedStar Washington under safety investigation (WBJ, 9/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 
Communications Manager | United Philanthropy Forum – New!
Senior Program Associate, Engaged Practice Division, Healthcare Engagement Program | The Democracy Collaborative – New!
Program Associate, Portfolio Support, Public and Patient Engagement | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Program Associate, Public and Patient Engagement | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Program Officer, Public Engagement | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Program Coordinator | Exponent Philanthropy
Membership & Marketing Associate | Exponent Philanthropy
Membership Development Manager| Exponent Philanthropy
Management Associate | Public Welfare Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click the image below to access the calendar.


Take a break this afternoon and enjoy a game of checkers.

– Kendra

September 14, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

A look at the gain and loss of income in the Greater Washington region

INCOME | According to Census Bureau statistics released today, the District and Alexandria, VA, were one of the few areas in our region that saw a decline in its median household income in 2016. Loudoun, Howard, Fairfax, and Arlington counties all saw gains. (WaPo, 9/14)

[Councilmember David] Grosso said he thinks the District’s demographics are at the root of the numbers: Young people with just-out-of-college salaries flock to the city, but as they start families and their incomes grow, the high-earning couples with children tend to leave for more affordable D.C. suburbs or other regions of the country. He hopes the District’s new paid family leave policy and improving public schools can persuade parents to stay put.

RACE | Tamara Lucas Copeland, WRAG’s president, discusses why nonprofit leadership is still predominantly white and challenges us to think about the root cause of why that is. (Daily, 9/14)

YOUTH/LGBTQ | According to a recently released Youth Risk Behavior Survey, one in four DC teens who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual have attempted suicide. (MetroWeekly, 8/25)

PUBLIC SAFETYAt Immigration Forum, A Call for Sheriff’s Office’s Relationship With ICE to be ‘Revisited’ (ARLnow, 9/14)

EDUCATION | Loudoun County has launched the state’s first computer science immersion schools, where all students are required to spend part of the school day learning to code. (Loudoun Now, 9/4)

ENVIRONMENT | Maryland advocates want the state to pass legislation requiring state utilities to buy half of their electricity from renewable sources. (WaPo, 9/13)

HEALTH CARE | More than 60,000 Virginians will not be able to buy health insurance next year due to insurers leaving the state’s health exchange. (Richmond Times, 9/13)


The incredibly true story of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s trip to Washington, DC and the Capitol.

– Kendra

September 14, 2017 / WRAG

Why aren’t there more leaders of color in the nonprofit sector?

By Tamara Lucas Copeland
President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

I’ve been reading a lot recently about white flight and residential segregation. Generally researchers used to agree that a white neighborhood could “tolerate” (yes, that was the term frequently used), 5% people of color, maybe 10%, and still maintain its stability. If any more were to move in, the neighborhood was considered to be declining.

Today, in many cities across the country, and especially here in DC, we aren’t seeing white flight. In fact, just the opposite. Whites are flocking to urban areas and displacing blacks, but the sentiment that is engendered now is the same as a generation ago. As more whites move into communities, the neighborhoods are seen as pretty, safe, desirable, and worthy of investment. Where neighborhoods remain majority black, the areas are perceived as blighted and dangerous. White is good. Black is bad.

I think this same dynamic holds true when you think about the lack of diversity in the leadership of nonprofit organizations.

Leading with Intent: 2017 National Index of Nonprofit Board Practices, a report recently released by BoardSource, had as its first finding, “Boards are no more diverse than they were two years ago and current recruitment priorities indicate this is unlikely to change.” Anne Wallestad, president of BoardSource is quoted in the Chronicle of Philanthropy, as calling this finding, “really disappointing.”

I would agree that it is disappointing, but it is not surprising. I believe there is a fear of organizational leadership integration just as there was a fear of residential integration. Now, hear me out. I believe that there is a fear, perhaps unconscious, of what will happen to the organization, just like some white homeowners in the past feared what would happen to their neighborhood. Will the organization’s prestige decline? Will donors, who are primarily white, have the same level of trust in the organization? Will the work of the organization change in a way that won’t be supported?

For over a year, the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers has looked at issues of structural racism and unconscious bias. Certainly, recruitment strategies are critically important to enabling a diverse pool of candidates. Nonprofit salary levels are also a consideration not always discussed when trying to recruit broadly. But based on what I’ve learned over the last 18 months, the reason for a lack of diverse leadership in nonprofit organizations may be much deeper and more entrenched. Remember: White is good and Black is bad. You may not think of it consciously, but the sentiment surrounds us like air.

If you are truly committed to diverse boards and increased people of color in nonprofit leadership positions, I urge you to put racism on the table and actively discuss and explore unconscious bias. Having that type of fundamental conversation, along with training, might make a difference.

*Make sure you read Anne Wallestad’s statement on the lack of diversity on nonprofit boards.