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June 23, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

New Senate health plan could negatively impact Virginia

HEALTH CARE
– Yesterday the Senate revealed its version of the proposed health care bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, and many states are worried about the changes. Virginia policymakers are particularly concerned with funding cuts to Medicaid and the change in the way funds are allocated to states. (Richmond Times, 6/22)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s administration said the measure would help states that expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act at the expense of states that didn’t, while reducing long-term federal funding for a program that has been shared equally with the state.

“States that expanded get more money for longer, and states that didn’t expand get less,” Secretary of Health and Human Resources Bill Hazel said in an interview Thursday. “It’s hard to dispute that the gap is increasing.”

– Senate Republicans Reveal Long-Awaited Affordable Care Act Repeal Bill (NPR, 6/22)

TRANSIT
– Next year, adult learners in the District will be able to use public transportation for free to get to school. (DCFPI, 6/20)

– A coalition of Greater Washington region business leaders is calling for Metro reform. (WBJ, 6/23)

EDUCATION | The District of Columbia public school system, parents, and policymakers are working together to fight overcrowding in ward 3 schools. (Current, 6/21)

HOUSING | When we talk about housing affordability, shouldn’t we include the cost of transportation? (Citylab, 6/23)

Related: Check out this post from WRAG’s What Funders Need to Know series where we explored how transportation factors into the cost of housing in our region.

IMMIGRATIONThe Supreme Court Defends the Integrity of U.S. Citizenship (Atlantic, 6/22)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Program Officer | Howard and Geraldine Polinger Family Foundation – New!
Development & Communications Coordinator | Girls on the Run – DC – New!
Senior Program Officer | George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation – New!
Development Director | National Alliance on Mental Illness of Montgomery County (NAMI MC) – New!
The Community Foundation Fellowship for Community Investment | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
The Community Foundation Fellowship for Special Projects | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Member Development Specialist | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Corporate Gifts Officer | FIRST Chesapeake
Officer, Philanthropic Networks, Philanthropic Partnerships | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Program Manager: Thriving Germantown Community HUB-Germantown, MD | Family Services, Inc.
Democracy Program Manager | Funder’s Committee for Civic Participation
Communications Manager | Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers
Director of Communications | de Beaumont Foundation
Program Coordinator, Grants and Selection | Jack Kent Cooke Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


These popsicles are literally trash.

– Kendra

June 22, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Prince William county school board votes to protect LGBTQ staff and students

DISCRIMINATION | The Prince William county school board has voted to ban discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Opponents cited concerns about restroom usage and the fact that courts haven’t issued concrete opinions about similar policies. At-Large Chairman Ryan Sawyers, the lead backer of the policy change, cited the mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub last year where LGBTQ individuals, mostly Latinx, were killed, as motivation for the change. (InsideNOVA, 6/21)

More than 500 people attended the board’s meeting in Bristow, though purple-clad supporters of the nondiscrimination measures dominated the board chambers — one joyous, drawn-out cry of “Equality!” rose above the raucous applause once the vote was tallied. When lawmakers considered the same change last fall, it was hundreds of opponents donned in red who packed the room.

“I wish I had this in my school 25 years ago,” said Danica Roem, the Democratic nominee in the 13th District of the House of Delegates and the first transgender woman to qualify for a Virginia ballot. “I don’t know how different my life would’ve been…I just hope these other kids are free to live as their true selves now.”

– This map shows every hate crime reported in the District in 2016, excluding crimes that occurred on federal land or college campuses. (NBC4, 6/20)

HEALTHCigna exits Maryland’s individual health insurance marketplace (WBJ, 6/21)

TRANSIT | Metro’s SafeTrack is ending, but newly shortened operating hours will still burden riders, especially those that work late-night shifts. (WAMU, 6/22)

PHILANTHROPYHow to Make Socioeconomic Diversity a Priority in Your Board Search (Chronicle, 6/21 – Subscription needed)

IMMIGRATION | Areas with sanctuary policies could be making the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s job more difficult. (Slate, 6/20)

EQUITY/WORKFORCE | An ACLU report explores the benefits of hiring returning citizens and offers recommendations to businesses that want to implement fair hiring practices. (ACLU, 6/21)

ELECTIONSSupreme Court picks up gerrymander case with potential implications for Maryland (Baltimore Sun, 6/19)


A look at the new Ben’s Chili Bowl mural (without Marvin Gaye)…

– Kendra

June 21, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

The District shuts down another tent city but homeless still have no where to go

HOMELESSNESS | Yesterday, the District cleared out an area near the NoMa neighborhood that was occupied by homeless individuals living in tents. City officials cited public health violations as a reason why these tent cities should be removed and offered shelter options, but for some, for various reasons, shelters aren’t an option. (WAMU, 6/20)

The officials say they don’t want to criminalize homelessness, and recognize that for as basic as they may be, tents offer at least some shelter to vulnerable residents who may not have anywhere else to go. But they also say that the longer the encampments stay up, the more they can become public health and safety nuisances.

“We actually have a right to shelter. We have places for people to be, so they don’t need to be camping on public land,” said Kristy Greenwalt, the director of the D.C. Interagency Council on Homelessness. “It’s actually much better for us to be able engage folks when they’re inside, we can offer services and it’s much safer for them and for the public.”

ARTS & HUMANITIES | Americans for the Arts has released its fifth economic impact study of the nation’s nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and their audiences. During fiscal year 2015, the Greater Washington DC region’s arts sector supported 59,423 full-time equivalent jobs and arts and cultural audiences spent a total of $1.58 billion on events. (Americans for the Arts, 6/19)

RACIAL EQUITY | Yanique Redwood, vice chair of WRAG’s board and CEO and president of Consumer Health Foundation, discusses how John Henryism relates to health and racial equity and why her organization is trying to create an environment free of structural racism. (CHF Blog, 6/21)

HEALTH | Hospitals across the country, including Maryland, are starting to feel the strain from opioid-related visits. (WaPo, 6/20)

PHILANTHROPY
– The Center for Effective Philanthropy has published a new report, Benchmarking Program Officer Roles and Responsibilities, to explore the role of program officers at foundations and with nonprofits. (CEP, 6/20)

– A map of the most generous living donors in the US. (Chronicle, 6/20)

FOOD INSECURITYNew D.C. Program Offers More Groceries To Seniors In Wards 7 And 8 (DCist, 6/20)

GENDER | DC will soon add a third gender option to its driver’s license and identification cards. (WAMU, 6/20)

ENVIRONMENT | A new study questions how much it really costs for the US to commit to 100% renewable energy. (Citylab, 6/20)


Check out these little known facts about DC’s Brookland neighborhood.

– Kendra

June 20, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

What will happen to the District’s Chinatown residents?

GENTRIFICATION | In 2013, a filmmaker documented the plight of Chinese senior citizens living in an apartment building in DC’s rapidly changing Chinatown. Four years later, the small population of Chinese residents left are in danger of losing their homes. (GGWash, 6/19)

A lot of senior citizens in Chinatown live in apartment buildings called the Wah Luck House and Museum Square. Most of the seniors are on fixed incomes, use Section 8 vouchers, and most have a limited ability to speak, read, and write English. Also, none has any intention of leaving, even as the owners of their buildings threaten to demolish their homes and replace them with luxury condos and commercial development. Residents are often unaware of things like neighborhood meetings, and language barriers prevent many from participating.

HOUSING AFFORDABILITYOur Region, Your Investment, a joint initiative between WRAG and Enterprise Community Loan Fund that has raised nearly $12 million in impact investments to date, has financed its fifth affordable housing deal, which will preserve the affordability of 202 homes in Wards 7 and 8 in the District.

Gretchen Greiner-Lott, WRAG’s vice president says, “WRAG is very excited about the success and impact that Our Region, Your Investment is having on housing affordability in our region. Check out this update and read about the five projects that have been supported by investments made thus far.”

RACIAL EQUITY | Did you miss our event, Reimagining Racial Equity through Participatory Grantmaking? Philip Walsh, executive director of Maine Initiatives, a public, community-based foundation focused on progressive causes, joined us to discuss their radically participatory process to connect community to grantmaking and why they believe bringing non-traditional voices to the table is critical to the success of racial justice work. Watch it here.

PHILANTHROPY | A new report finds that high net-worth donors of color are engaged in philanthropy, but aren’t visible as members of organized donor networks. (Silicon Valley Community Foundation, 6/11)

LGBTQCollecting LGBT Census Data Is ‘Essential’ To Federal Agency, Document Shows (NPR, 6/20)

LITERACY | An Anacostia radio station is trying to bring a bookstore east of the river, where there are none. (DCist, 6/19)

CHILDREN & YOUTH | This nonprofit is providing packs of personal items to children and youth in the Greater Washington area who are either entering or leaving foster care. (WBJ, 6/19)

EDUCATION | Teachers at the District’s Cesar Chavez Prep Middle School have voted to unionize. (WAMU, 6/16)


In case you were wondering how Spider-Man or Wonder Woman would look if they were created with balloons

– Kendra

June 19, 2017 / WRAG

A new way for parents and teachers to support students together

EDUCATION REFORM
– A new parent engagement style is slowly replacing the traditional parent-teacher conference. Academic Parent-Teacher Teams, where teachers and parents meet in a large group setting at least three times a year and teachers equip families with tools to reinforce classroom concepts, are operating in DC schools. Local grantmaker, Flamboyan Foundation, has helped bring the model to 30 schools in the District. (WaPo, 6/18)

…They discuss how students are performing on key measures such as reading comprehension and mastery of math concepts. Parents leave the meetings with games and other activities they can use at home to reinforce classroom learning.

“The traditional parent-teacher conference is isolationist,” said Maria Paredes, a former teacher who created a model in 2012 known as Academic Parent-Teacher Teams, or APTT. “It is me and the teacher, maybe my child, and I don’t hear about anyone else in the class.”

Event for Funders: Join us on September 28 for the third program in WRAG’s 2017 Public Education Learning Series, Curriculum: The Missing Ingredient in Education Reform, to learn how the focus on “basic skills” in education reform at the expense of social studies, science, and art at the elementary level can have devastating consequences as students progress through school. Register here.

– A District court has ruled that children of nonresident immigrants can access aid from the city’s college tuition fund. (WaPo, 6/16)

RACIAL EQUITY | Congratulations to WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland for being appointed as the Visiting Nielsen Fellow at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy! She, in partnership with Dr. Kathy Kretman, director of the Center for Public & Nonprofit Leadership and research professor at the McCourt School, will explore the role of philanthropy in addressing racial equity in the DC region and co-teach a graduate seminar on philanthropy and racial justice.

PUBLIC SAFETY | Officials: 17-year-old Muslim girl assaulted and killed after leaving Virginia mosque (WaPo, 6/18)

ARTS & HUMANITIES| This Loudoun-based business sells art created by individuals with autism. (WaPo, 6/19)

AFFORDABLE HOUSINGWard 8 Residents Outraged by Low Funding for Housing and NEAR Act in $13.8 Billion Budget (Street Sense, 6/14)

GENTRIFICATIONAmerican University’s Metropolitan Policy Center and KTURE Institute are hosting an event, Urban Transformation: Metropolitan Development, Demographic Change & Gentrification, on June 24 to discuss the experience of gentrification and how community redevelopment can be pursued in an equitable manner. For more information click here.


A makeover for the Watergate Hotel on the 45th anniversary of the break-in.

– Kendra

June 16, 2017 / WRAG

Low-income residents face additional barriers with no identification

POVERTY | Losing a birth certificate, social security card or even an ID can be a minor inconvenience for some. For homeless and low-income individuals, this is a drastic event that creates another barrier that few are able to overcome. In the DC area, these churches and nonprofit organizations are helping people get IDs. (WaPo, 6/15)

“Before REAL ID was implemented, Bread did not experience a large number of inquiries regarding IDs,” says Danielle Moise, Bread’s attorney on its Accessing Identifying Documents Project. Anecdotally, she says, the nonprofit saw a decline from that 1,000 in 2015 (2016 totals are not in yet). “It’s unclear what the reason for this has been. I imagine a number of people have simply given up on this effort as getting an ID seems insurmountable,” she explains. “Our social workers tell me, however, that although the numbers have declined, IDs still seem to be the second-most- requested service, after requests for affordable housing.”

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AWARDS | Congrats to WGL/Washington Gas for being named Outstanding Corporate Citizen of the Year (Large Business) by the Northern Virginia Chamber! Other WRAG members who were in the running included CareFirst, CSRA, Kaiser Permanente, PNC, and Wells Fargo. Keep up the good work! (Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce, 6/14)

GENTRIFICATION | Opinion: A community member from the District’s River Terrace neighborhood responds to a recent Washington Post article. (DCist, 6/15)

DISTRICTFormer D.C. Councilman Jim Graham dies at 71 (WBJ, 6/15)

TRANSIT | How the proposed Transportation Benefits Equity Act, which will require employers to let their employees opt for cash or transit benefits in lieu of an employer-provided parking space, is good for DC residents. (GGWash, 6/13)

FOODHow The White Establishment Waged A ‘War’ On Chinese Restaurants In The U.S. (NPR, 6/16)


Social Sector Job Openings 

The Community Foundation Fellowship for Community Investment | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region – New!
The Community Foundation Fellowship for Special Projects | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region – New!
Member Development Specialist | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Corporate Gifts Officer | FIRST Chesapeake
Officer, Philanthropic Networks, Philanthropic Partnerships | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Program Manager: Thriving Germantown Community HUB-Germantown, MD | Family Services, Inc.
Democracy Program Manager | Funder’s Committee for Civic Participation
Communications Manager | Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers
Director of Communications | de Beaumont Foundation
Program Coordinator, Grants and Selection | Jack Kent Cooke Foundation
Major Gift Officer–DC | Urban Teachers
Program Analyst | Clark Charitable Foundation, Inc.

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A look at films from the 2017 AFI DOCS Film Festival.

– Kendra

June 15, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Report finds AHCA could be beneficial in our region, but not in the long term

HEALTH
– A new George Washington University report found that the proposed American Health Care Act, the replacement bill for the Affordable Care Act, could cost DC $1.2 billion in the next decade, $2.4 billion in Maryland and $700 million in Virginia. However, in the short-term, the bill could increase jobs in our region. (WBJ, 6/14)

“The way the bill is structured, the first thing it does is repeal some taxes,” Ku [director of the Center for Health Policy Research at the GW University Milken Institute School of Public Health] said. “In fact, the federal government goes into a deficit for a couple of years because it’s giving up some of the taxes that are part of the Affordable Care Act. So, more people in the District retain more money and use that to consume things and create other jobs.”

However, those regional benefits are expected to fade over time, Ku said. “The coverage changes that are part of the plan sort of deepen over time. As things such as the rollback of Medicaid eligibility expansion, which was a big deal for the District, and where they begin to wrap Medicaid up with per-capita caps and start to change the way insurance premium tax credits are used, that accumulates over time.”

– Evergreen Health, a Maryland health insurance co-op, is converting to a for-profit insurance company. (Baltimore Sun, 6/14)

EDUCATION
– Transgender Teachers Talk About Their Experiences At School (WAMU, 6/15)

– This Maryland school hosts book giveaways at the end of the school year to encourage its students to read during the summer. (WaPo, 6/14)

TRANSIT | The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments has approved principles for the region to use when creating a region-wide plan to provide funding for Metro. (WTOP, 6/15)

HOUSING | A new report found that Montgomery County, MD residents pay more than 50% of their annual incomes on rent. (Bethesda Beat, 6/14)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | Grants from the National Endowments for the Arts have helped many individuals raise funds from other entities. What will happen to the arts community if federal funding is cut? (WaPo, 6/8)

INNOVATION | The American Express Leadership Academy Emerging Innovators Bootcamps are now open for registration. They are looking for 100 changemakers around the world who are positively transforming communities and revolutionizing healthcare, education, food security and other pressing issues.

NONPROFITS | Despite decline in retail stores, charities saw $441 million raised from checkout counters last year. (Chronicle, 6/14 – Subscription needed)


Fried chicken skin ice cream sandwiches exist and you can try them on Monday.

– Kendra