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July 27, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

New report explores how philanthropy can foster an equitable regional food system

FOOD/ EQUITY | A new report, Funding the Foodshed: An Assessment of Funding Levels, Priorities, and Opportunities in the Chesapeake Region, by Arabella Advisors provides an analysis of the state of food funding in the region and uncovers trends, gaps, and actionable opportunities for funders. (Arabella Advisors, 7/26)

The first step to attract funding to address the regional food system holistically is communicating a vision of success to other funders—both regional and national, food-focused and non-food-focused. Providing resources for the creation and distribution of such a message will be crucial to fostering collaboration and holistic thinking throughout the foodshed. The narrative would outline actionable goals for the future and indicators to track and report progress, and it would elevate needs and tailor messages in a way that resonates with the most critical individuals, groups, and funders within philanthropy and other funding sources in the region.

TRANSGENDER RIGHTS | Funders for LGBTQ Issues has released a statement in response to the president’s recent anti-transgender statements. Read it here

WORKFORCE | A Montgomery County council member has introduced new legislation to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. (Bethesda Beat, 7/26)

YOUTH | Why the Myth of Meritocracy Hurts Kids of Color (Atlantic, 7/27)

ARTS & HUMANITIES
– The House appropriations committee has approved a bill to continue financing the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities and other cultural agencies. (NYT, 7/20)

– How public art can strengthen a community (GGWash, 7/19)

HEALTH CARELosing Obamacare Could Leave Tens of Thousands of D.C. Residents Without Insurance (Street Sense, 7/26)


The Smithsonian’s Asian-American Literary Festival is happening this weekend.

– Kendra

July 26, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

The repeal of the Affordable Care Act is near

HEALTH CARE
– Yesterday, amid weeks of protests by individuals who will be negatively impacted by recent proposals to cut Medicaid funding and other programs, the Senate voted to begin debating the healthcare bill that will repeal significant parts of the Affordable Care Act. (NYT, 7/25)

Senate Republicans still have no agreement on a repeal bill that they can ultimately pass to uproot the law that has provided health insurance to millions of Americans.

The Senate is now moving ahead with debate, amendments and ultimately a final vote in the coming days on legislation that would have a profound effect on the American health care system — roughly one-sixth of the United States’ economy. But it is entirely possible that by week’s end, the senators will have passed nothing.

– Yanique Redwood, vice chair of WRAG’s board and president and CEO of Consumer Health Foundation, discusses the underlying race-related issues in the healthcare policy debate that few are talking about. (CHF Blog, 7/25)

PHILANTHROPY | Foundations Are Deepening Racism Even as They Seek to Fight It (Chronicle, 7/25 – Subscription needed)

TRANSGENDER RIGHTS | The president announced a ban on transgender people serving in the military on Twitter. (WaPo, 7/26)

PUBLIC SAFETY | A federal appeals court has ruled that the District’s strict concealed-carry gun law violates the Second Amendment and can’t be enforced. (DCist, 7/25)

HOUSING | A promising new coalition in the District looks to rewrite the politics of urban housing (Vox, 7/24)

ENVIRONMENT | Due to efforts to promote less waste in the Greater Washington region, including a ban on Styrofoam, more people are recycling. (WTOP, 7/26)

INNOVATION | The Horizon Foundation and the United Way of Central Maryland have come together to launch a competition for Maryland residents focused on sparking innovation to address some of Howard County’s social issues. (Baltimore Sun, 7/17)

IMMIGRATION | A judge has ruled against a Justice Department decision that nonprofit legal groups cannot provide “certain legal assistance to immigrants facing deportation unless it undertakes full, formal representation of them in court.” (USNews, 7/24)


A look at 1960s to 1980s Urban Photography

– Kendra

July 25, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

The District will continue to protect low-income families receiving TANF benefits

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | Due to a time limit, families who have been receiving assistance from the TANF program for longer than 60 months were set to lose their benefits this October. The District has eliminated the time limit and introduced new legislation to help families become self-sufficient. (WaPo, 7/24)

The city’s Department of Human Services, which runs the TANF program, has contracts with private service-providers that offer job training, education and other forms of help aimed at getting clients off the welfare rolls. With “the cliff” no longer looming, and thousands of 60-monthers due to continue getting benefits, the agency said it intends to beef up those services, hoping to boost the rate of welfare “exits.”

“One of the things we looked at carefully was, ‘What is the cost of not doing this?’ ” said council member Brianne K. Nadeau (D-Ward 1), a member of the study group and a leading opponent of the TANF cutoff. “We found that if just one out of 10 of these families falls into homelessness, then the cost of getting them out would be far greater” than the cost of continuing TANF benefits. “So we’ll be saving money by helping them.”

INSTITUTE FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY | Registration is now open for the 2018 Institute for Corporate Social Responsibility! Read why this program is beneficial for CSR professionals here. (CSR Wire, 7/18)

HEALTH | Maryland health officials are working to bring needle exchange programs to several of its counties. (WaPo, 7/19)

POVERTY | Once again, Loudoun is the nation’s most affluent county. So why isn’t everyone celebrating? (Loudoun Times, 7/20)

HOUSING | Developers and displaced community residents are often the topic of discussion when District residents talk about gentrification, but what about the powerful people who use their privilege to prevent their neighborhoods from changing?  (GGWash, 7/21)

TRANSIT | Maryland now has approval from a federal appeals court to build its light-rail project, the Purple Line. (WaPo, 7/19)

PHILANTHROPY | The Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers is now the United Philanthropy Forum. More information about the change here.

EDUCATION | Civil rights advocates and education groups in the District are calling for DC public schools to audit its suspension rates after a recent investigation found that some schools were not classifying suspended students correctly. (WAMU, 7/19)

IMMIGRATION20 Democratic attorneys general urge Trump to keep DACA, say it has boosted economy (WaPo, 7/21)


Remembering Jim Vance

– Kendra

July 17, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

This District nonprofit wants to make homeownership a reality for residents east of the river

HOUSING
– As the cost of living has risen in the District and gentrification has become the norm, homeownership has become a distant dream for many of the city’s residents. Lydia’s House, a nonprofit that offers guidance to first-time, low- and moderate-income home buyers, is trying to change that. (WaPo, 7/16)

With home prices across the city continuing to rise, east-of-the-river neighborhoods such as Anacostia and Congress Heights, which the District housing boom had largely passed over, are becoming increasingly desirable — and expensive.

As more investors and homeowners look east in the hopes of riding the wave of development, there are also worries that residents will be priced out of what has historically been a low- and moderate-income part of the city, forced to move further out, beyond the boundaries of the District. Homeownership can provide a needed hedge against skyrocketing rents.

What Are DC Residents Spending More Money On? Housing, Health Care and Restaurants (DCFPI, 7/14)

EDUCATION | District officials have announced that the city will offer scholarships to day care providers to help them get a post-secondary degree. (WAMU, 7/14)

HEALTH
– A group of studies have found that the stress of poverty and racism increases the risk of dementia for African-Americans. (WaPo, 7/16)

– What The ‘Crack Baby’ Panic Reveals About The Opioid Epidemic (Atlantic, 7/16)

POVERTY | A Virginia lawmaker has proposed legislation that would exempt workers and companies in the state’s poorest localities from income taxes for 10 years. (Richmond Times, 7/13)

ARLINGTON COUNTYNo Longer A County Boy: Arlington Official Says County Should Become A City (WAMU, 7/14)

ENVIRONMENT | A new study on the impact of rising sea levels on coastal regions in the US lays out a timeline for Maryland and Virginia. (WaPo, 7/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Executive Director | Agua Fund
Database Assistant | Greater Washington Community Foundation
Senior Administrative Assistant/Foundation Coordinator | The Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation, the Nancy Peery Marriott Foundation and the Marriott Daughters Foundation
Program Officer | The Diane & Bruce Halle Foundation
Program Officer | Howard and Geraldine Polinger Family Foundation
Development Coordinator | Girls on the Run – DC
Senior Program Officer | George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation
Corporate Gifts Officer | FIRST Chesapeake
Officer, Philanthropic Networks, Philanthropic Partnerships | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Program Manager: Thriving Germantown Community HUB-Germantown, MD | Family Services, Inc.

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


The Daily will be on break until July 25th!

Here are ten ways to celebrate National Peach Ice Cream Day!

– Kendra

July 14, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

How do we make cultural philanthropy more equitable?

ARTS & HUMANITIES | The Helicon Collaborative has released a study, Not Just Money: Equity Issues in Cultural Philanthropy, that explores inequities in arts funding in the US. Among the chief findings, the study found that, although foundations have made efforts to be diverse and inclusive, funding overall has gotten less equitable. (Medium, 7/10)

In spite of this increased attention and activity, the distribution of arts funding nationally is actually getting more concentrated in the hands of the institutions that already have the most resources.

The 2 percent cohort is made up of 925 cultural groups that have annual budgets of more than $5 million. (NCCS) These organizations are symphonies, opera companies, regional theaters, art museums, ballet companies and other large institutions — the majority of which focus primarily on Western European fine arts traditions. While most of these institutions have made sincere efforts to broaden participation in the past decade, their audiences remain predominantly white and upper income. (NEA Research Report #57)

HEALTH
– These nurse practitioners have set up health clinics to care for low-income populations in three counties in Northern Virginia. (InsideNOVA, 7/14)

– ‘We’re losing more people to the sweets than to the streets’: Why two black pastors are suing Coca-Cola (WaPo, 7/13)

HUMAN RIGHTS | Tonight, activists will march in the District to push the city to do more to end violence against transgender woman, especially those of color. (DCist, 7/13)

ECONOMY | Loudoun County has been named the richest county in the United States again. (Loudoun Times, 7/13)

Related: The Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties recently launched the Faces of Loudoun, a campaign that features the stories of real Loudoun residents who’ve struggled with the lack of basic resources.

REPRESENTATION | The DC Council is working to give DC Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton a vote in the House of Representatives on District matters only. (Current, 7/12)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Executive Director | Agua Fund – New!
Database Assistant | Greater Washington Community Foundation – New!
Senior Administrative Assistant/Foundation Coordinator | The Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation, the Nancy Peery Marriott Foundation and the Marriott Daughters Foundation – New!
Program Officer | The Diane & Bruce Halle Foundation
Program Officer | Howard and Geraldine Polinger Family Foundation
Development Coordinator | Girls on the Run – DC
Senior Program Officer | George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation
Corporate Gifts Officer | FIRST Chesapeake
Officer, Philanthropic Networks, Philanthropic Partnerships | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Program Manager: Thriving Germantown Community HUB-Germantown, MD | Family Services, Inc.

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Krispy Kreme is celebrating its 80th birthday with $0.80 donuts.

– Kendra

July 13, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

How can philanthropy really help vulnerable populations?

PHILANTHROPY
– Amazon founder Jeff Bezos recently announced he would practice more charitable giving. His approach, giving money to charities that directly help people now instead of investing in long term impact, has caused a renewed conversation on the work and practice of philanthropy. (Chronicle, 6/15)

Gretchen Greiner-Lott, vice president of WRAG, says:

At the end of June, Jeff Bezos sent a tweet to the universe asking for advice on how he should design his philanthropy. This story was covered by the Washington Post and the Chronicle of Philanthropy responded, as well. The story even prompted a response from Wilt Corkern of the Corina Higginson Trust and WRAG Board member. What do you think? (WaPo, 7/7)

EDUCATION
– After analyzing the low college graduation rates of DC high school graduates, the DC State Board of Education plans to review graduation requirements to determine whether changes are needed. (WaPo, 7/12)

– DC’s new education chancellor, Antwan Wilson, reflects on the progress and failures he’s seen during his first year. (GGWash, 7/12)

FOOD INSECURITYSchool Cafeterias Ramp Up Efforts to Feed Loudoun Kids Through the Summer (Loudoun Now, 7/12)

CHILDREN | To reduce the District’s infant mortality rate, the DC Council has introduced a new bill that would provide new parents with a “baby box” and educational resources to encourage safe sleeping practices. (DCist, 7/12)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | How the Anacostia Arts Center became a project by and for the community. (DC Music Download, 7/12)


How easily we blend into the environment.

– Kendra

July 12, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Homelessness could become a protected class in the District

HOMELESSNESS
–  Almost 7,500 people were classified as homeless in the District as of January 2017. Due to the significant barriers the homeless population face in employment, housing, and other areas, a DC Council member has introduced a bill that would make being homeless a protected class under the D.C. Human Rights Act.  (WCP, 7/11)

The legislation would simply add homelessness to the law’s list of almost 20 protected traits and allow the homeless to bring legal complaints with the District, possibly resulting in civil penalties, compensatory damages, or reinstatement of jobs. Typically, homelessness is defined in D.C. as not having a “fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence,” including those sleeping on the streets, in cars, and in shelters. The council is also considering sweeping changes to its primary homeless services law, which officials say would bring D.C.’s definition of homelessness in line with federal guidelines.

Without Leadership at HUD, DC’s Anti-Homelessness Officials Have No Idea What’s Coming (Washingtonian, 6/29)

CHILDREN | A Maryland candidate for governor has proposed lending money to working families to assist in their childcare costs. (Baltimore Sun, 7/12)

DISCRIMINATION | Last year, Montgomery County, MD saw a surge in hate-based incidents in its school system. (WaPo, 7/11)

ECONOMY
– A new George Mason University study ranks the fiscal health of Virginia and Maryland. (WBJ, 7/11)

– The District’s latest minimum wage increase to $12.50 went into effect on July 1. (DCFPI, 7/11)

HOUSINGBlack Homeowners Struggle as Housing Market Recovers (NBC News, 7/10)

GOVERNMENT | The District government is hosting a workshop on July 22 to hear resident feedback on various government forms including drivers license forms. More information here


Giant bowls you can relax in will come to Arlington soon.

– Kendra