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January 12, 2018 / Kendra Allen, Editor

High school students in the Greater Washington region are learning advocacy strategies

ADVOCACY/ YOUTH | Last year saw many residents in the Greater Washington region becoming more involved in politics and considering their roles as citizens in this nation. Youth, especially high school students, were particularly involved in demonstrations, such as the walkout after the administration’s DACA decision. Now young people across the region have come together for a three-day summit to better understand their civil rights.

Students also heard from Claudia Quiñonez, who helped organize a group of undocumented students, parents and supporters into United We Dream, a reference to those who had gained legal status under the now eliminated Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. They watched a documentary on Joe Arpaio, the longtime Phoenix-area sheriff whose approach to jail and immigration issues attracted controversy, and a movie about Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who disclosed documents on government surveillance programs.

“Things that go on in our world . . . affect us, too, and I think it’s really cool that we get to have those types of conversations,” said Chloe Pine, a 15-year-old member of the ACLU club at the School Without Walls.

NONPROFITSPotomac Health Foundation has partnered with Prince William Public Library System and the Foundation Center to help Prince William County grantseekers by opening a Funding Information Network. (PWL, 1/11)

MARYLAND | Maryland’s House of Delegates have voted to enact paid sick leave in the state and ban the box on private and public college’s student applications. (WaPo, 1/11)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– The Manassas mobile home park that was in danger of being sold, and leaving 58 families homeless was officially bought by a nonprofit, Catholics for Housing. (InsideNOVA, 1/11)

 DC Mayor Bowser announces $2.5M loan that will preserve 49 affordable units in Fort Totten (Curbed DC, 1/11)

EDUCATION | America’s Schools Are ‘Profoundly Unequal,’ Says U.S. Civil Rights Commission (NPR, 1/11)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | ​DC was​ ​named​ ​the​ ​25th Any​ ​Given​ ​Child​ ​city​ ​by​ ​the​ ​John​ ​F.​ ​Kennedy​ ​Center​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Performing​ ​Arts. Any Given Child is a collective impact program that assists communities in expanding arts education in schools. Help the DC Arts and Humanities Education Collaborative collect information about the city’s existing arts education programs for youth by completing this survey.


Social Sector Job Openings 

Executive Director, Rock Creek Conservancy | Rock Creek Conservancy
Finance and Operations Associate | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Development Manager | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Development Associate | New Endeavors by Women
Executive Director | My Sister’s Place
Philanthropy Officer | Community Foundation for Northern Virginia
TIAA Nonprofit Leadership Fellows | University of Maryland & Do Good Institute
Director of Membership and Programs | Funders Together to End Homelessness
Director of Policy and Communication | Consumer Health Foundation
Development and Marketing Associate | Laurel Advocacy and Referral Services, Inc.
Director of Grants Management | Democracy Fund
Officer, Communications | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Events Assistant | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Member Engagement Manager | United Philanthropy Forum
Finance Manager (Part-Time) | United Philanthropy Forum
Vice President, Program and Community | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Senior Director, Strategy and Racial Equity | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Program Director, Washington, DC Community | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Program Director, Virginia Community | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Communications Manager | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. 


The Daily will be back on Tuesday.

Here’s some Michael Jackson to start off your Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend.

– Kendra

January 11, 2018 / Kendra Allen, Editor

New work requirements could impact some Medicaid participants

HEALTHCARE | The administration has announced that the federal government will allow states to test work requirements for Medicaid. There are more than 74 million people participating in the program but this would only affect some, since adults with disabilities and children make up a large portion of its enrollees. (KHN, 1/11)

Adding a work requirement to Medicaid would mark one of the biggest changes to the program since its inception in 1966. It is likely to prompt a lawsuit from patient advocacy groups, which claim the requirement is inconsistent with Medicaid’s objectives and would require an act of Congress.

The document says who should be excluded from the new work requirements — including children and people being treated for opioid abuse — and offers suggestions as to what counts as “work.” Besides employment, it can include job training, volunteering or caring for a close relative.

PHILANTHROPY | Congratulations to Jennifer Lockwood-Shabat, President & CEO of the Washington Area Women’s Foundation, for being awarded the Philanthropy Women 2018 Wonder Woman Award for Leadership in Women’s Funds! (Philanthropy Women, 1/8)

VETERANS | Boeing will commit $10 million to veterans’ recovery and rehabilitation programs and military transition services to support the Military Service Initiative at the George W. Bush Institute. (PND Blog, 1/11)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | Actors in Sovereignty, a new play premiering at Arena Stage, discuss the US’s treatment of Native Americans and their history. (DC Theatre Scene, 1/10)

PUBLIC SAFETY | They were friends as kids, then on opposite sides of the law. Now they’re mentoring D.C. teens together. (WaPo, 1/11)

HIV/AIDS | The DC Health Department has launched a new ad encouraging people to talk to their doctors about the HIV prevention drug, PrEP. (WUSA9, 1/10)

IMMIGRATION |On Wednesday, ICE agents conducted a nationwide operation targeting 7-Elevens in hopes of finding undocumented workers. They made 21 arrests. (WaPo, 1/10)

TRANSIT | Here are the details of the recent Metro proposal to refund riders if a bus or train delay of at least 15 minutes makes riders late to their destination. (NextCity, 1/8)


Do you think you could finish a marathon running backwards? These people did.

– Kendra

January 10, 2018 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Why health inequity is behind the US’s drop in life expectancy

HEALTH
– The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that the average life expectancy in the US has dropped for the second year in a row, a trend that largely impacts the poor and middle class. This author argues that we should be addressing growing health inequity. (Vox, 1/9)

So when we talk about life expectancy slipping, what we should also talk about is the growing problem of health inequality in America. And it’s an increasingly urgent discussion, health researchers are warning, because of policy changes on the horizon that are poised to make the mortality gap even wider.

Some of these policies will hamper access to medical care (such as failing to fund CHIP, the health insurance program for low-income children) but others that aren’t even directly related to health care — like tax cuts — may have even more insidious effects on the American mortality gap.

– Maryland Lawmakers Propose Reinstating Health Insurance Mandate — With A Twist (WAMU, 1/9)

PUBLIC SAFETY/LGBTQ | A Virginia delegate has proposed legislation that would prohibit the state’s healthcare providers from using conversion therapy on children under 18. This will be the third time similar legislation has been introduced in this state. (Arlnow, 1/9)

IMMIGRATION | A federal judge has temporarily blocked the administration’s decision to end DACA. (NPR, 1/10)

ECONOMY20 years ago, Discovery helped save Silver Spring. What happens now that it’s leaving? (GGW, 1/9)

TRANSPORTATION | Over the last few months, DC residents have complained about the numerous dockless bikes that have been released around the city, but are these bikes helping to diversify DC’s cyclists? (CityLab, 1/9)

CRIMINAL JUSTICEVirginia’s female prison population climbing faster than males’ population (Richmond Times, 1/9)


Did you see that video of the woman preparing a meal by using her mouth instead of utensils? Well, here’s the explanation we needed. 

– Kendra

January 9, 2018 / Kendra Allen, Editor

How the end of TPS will impact the Greater Washington region’s Salvadoran community and the region

IMMIGRATION
– Yesterday the federal government announced that Temporary Protective Status for people from El Salvador will end in September 2019. Many in the Greater Washington region reacted to the news that many Salvadorans, who make up the largest immigrant group in our region, will have to leave the homes they’ve made here. (WaPo, 1/8)

Labor leaders said Salvadorans with protected status mop floors in Washington museums and empty wastebaskets at the World Bank. They are also construction workers, business owners, managers and investors. A mass exodus would impact the D.C. workforce and economy, as well as the economy in El Salvador, where TPS holders send millions of dollars to family members each year.

“It is going to be devastating for us,” said Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III (D). “Whether it’s construction or the service industry, the impact it will have is just devastating.”

– Decision to End Protected Status for Salvadorans Expected to Affect Montgomery County Immigrants (Bethesda Beat, 1/8)

RACIAL EQUITYMeyer Foundation‘s Karen Fitzgerald, senior director for program and community, and Julian Haynes, Maryland program director, have announced that the foundation has a new grantmaking focus to align with its commitment to racial equity. (Meyer Blog, 1/8)

PHILANTHROPY | Aaron Dorfman, CEO of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, lists the three things foundations can do to support nonprofits this year. (Chronicle, 1/8 – Subscription needed)

HOUSING | The Administration Just Derailed a Key Obama Rule on Housing Segregation (CityLab, 1/4)

CLIMATE CHANGE | A new tool on Google shows how rising sea levels will impact various cities. The District’s Southwest and Southeast areas would be the most devastated. (UrbanTurf, 1/8)

EDUCATION
– Northern Virginia is taking steps to diversify its teaching force by recruiting and hiring more teachers of color. (WaPo, 1/7)

– Expansion of AP computer science courses draws more girls and students of color (WaPo, 1/8)


To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign and Resurrection City, the DC Public Library has digitized the Poor People’s Campaign Collection, which contains memorabilia, newspapers, and other items that document the campaign. 

– Kendra

January 8, 2018 / WRAG

Eradicating poverty must involve expanding housing stability

Almost two years ago, Matthew Desmond’s published his Pulitzer-prize winning book, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, detailing the rise of evictions. WRAG’s Vice President, Gretchen Greiner-Lott, tweeted about the book last August and provides her thoughts on this growing problem in the blog below.


By Gretchen Greiner-Lott
Vice President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

Over the summer, I took a trans-continental flight to attend a conference. I usually enjoy losing myself in a book of fiction during my travels. This time, I took a book of fact – and it wasn’t pretty. In the pages of Matthew Desmond’s Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, there were tales of families, landlords, governments, courts, and businesses, who were all part of a growing issue in our country – evictions.

According to Desmond, back in the day, whole communities would come out to witness and support their neighbors who were in the process of being evicted. Back then, evictions were rare. Now, millions of Americans are evicted each year, and a whole cottage industry has developed around it – eviction movers, eviction storage, businesses that provide landlords with new tenants as soon as old tenants are evicted, and data mining companies that provide reports to landlords about prospective renters’ eviction history.

Why has the number of evictions risen to this crisis point? Because we have an underlying problem – a lack of affordable and safe homes. Although the book focuses specifically on how this issue plays out in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (from 2008-2009), it is an American tale. And the story has been getting worse over these past nine years.

According to Rental Insecurity: The Threat of Evictions to America’s Renters, a recent report by Apartment List, one in five renters has recently struggled or been unable to pay rent. Other findings include that:

  • black households experience the highest rate of evictions, even when controlling for education and income
  • households with children are twice as likely to experience an eviction threat, regardless of marital status
  • evictions have been tied to poor health outcomes in both adults and children
  • evictions are a leading cause of homelessness

Once you have an eviction on your rental record, it is harder to find and rent the next apartment. So people who have experienced eviction discover that the only places they can rent are in worse neighborhoods and in worse condition than their previous apartment. And the rent does not go down; in some cases, it may actually go up. This creates a downward spiral in both living conditions and economic stability.

Desmond states in his prologue that “We have failed to fully appreciate how deeply housing is implicated in the creation of poverty.” So, for those of you who are trying to combat poverty but are not looking at housing as a cure, it’s time.

If you are interested in learning more about housing affordability issues in and solutions for the Greater Washington region, WRAG invites all members to join future Affordable Housing Action Team (AHAT) meetings. The first AHAT meeting of 2018 will be on February 20 from 10am to noon at WRAG. Look for more information in WRAG’s weekly event e-blast.


In April, the National Building Museum will host an exhibit based on the book, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. They hope to create an experience that will allow visitors to understand the challenges families face when they are forced to undergo the traumatic experience of being evicted. Learn more here

January 5, 2018 / Kendra Allen, Editor

How the District can improve public transportation in wards 7 and 8

TRANSIT | Metro bus and rail riders east of the Anacostia River have the longest commute times in the District. DC Policy Center believes the city can improve public transportation for these communities by integrating buses and the rail, including making transfers between the two free. (DC Policy Center, 1/4)

Public transit east of the Anacostia River has unique challenges: difficult physical geography, Metrorail stations that are not placed for optimal bus connections, and very low incomes among riders. But it is possible to overcome these challenges; the area is not doomed to circuitous bus routes.

The central piece to improving the area’s public transportation is fare integration between buses and trains, through very small increases in bus fares and free transfers. With fare integration, passengers are likely to switch from buses to Metrorail, which has lower cost of service provision, which would allow pruning some bus branches. This has the potential to stimulate sufficient additional ridership that despite the decrease in fare collection, the overall public subsidy required may yet go down.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY | Graham McLaughlin, WRAG board member and managing director of community impact program at Advisory Board Company, and Marc DeCourcey, senior vice president of the US Chamber of Commerce Foundation and our partner in the Institute for CSR, joined other leaders in discussing the lessons they learned from their company’s CSR work in 2017. (Huffington Post, 12/26)

WORKFORCE | The Greater Washington region weigh the potential consequences after Attorney General Jeff Sessions released a directive encouraging the enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states where it has been legalized. (WaPo, 1/4)

POVERTY/ TECHNOLOGY | Opinion: Elisabeth A. Mason, founding director of the Stanford Poverty and Technology Lab, considers the role of artificial intelligence and data in lifting people out of poverty. (NYT, 1/1)

SEXUAL ASSAULT | Me Too Creator Tarana Burke Reminds Us This Is About Black and Brown Survivors (YES! Magazine, 1/4)

PUBLIC SAFETY 
– In 2017, the number of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty dropped to its second lowest in fifty years. Forty-four of the 128 officers that have died were shot and killed. (USA Today, 12/28)

– According to a Washington Post ongoing investigation, the police shot and killed almost 1,000 people in 2017. (WaPo, 1/5)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Executive Director, Rock Creek Conservancy | Rock Creek Conservancy – New!
Finance and Operations Associate | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation – New!
Development Manager | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations – New!
Development Associate | New Endeavors by Women – New!
Executive Director | My Sister’s Place – New!
Philanthropy Officer | Community Foundation for Northern Virginia – New!
TIAA Nonprofit Leadership Fellows | University of Maryland & Do Good Institute – New!
Director of Membership and Programs | Funders Together to End Homelessness
Program Assistant | Climate and Land Use Alliance (CLUA)
Director of Policy and Communication | Consumer Health Foundation
Administrative Assistant to the President (Part-Time) | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Development and Marketing Associate | Laurel Advocacy and Referral Services, Inc.
Director of Grants Management | Democracy Fund
Officer, Communications | The Pew Charitable Trusts
Events Assistant | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Member Engagement Manager | United Philanthropy Forum
Finance Manager (Part-Time) | United Philanthropy Forum
Vice President, Program and Community | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Senior Director, Strategy and Racial Equity | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Program Director, Washington, DC Community | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Program Director, Virginia Community | Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Communications Manager | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. 


This weather is literally freezing animals.

– Kendra