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January 19, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

Inauguration will displace D.C.’s homeless

HOMELESSNESS | The District’s Department of Human Services and area nonprofits are reaching out to the homeless population downtown who will be displaced by security measures for the inauguration. The city estimates 600 people could be affected and are expanding capacity at shelters. (WCP, 1/18)

Several day-time programs that provide food and activities for the homeless will remain open Friday despite the D.C. government’s general closure that day. Meanwhile, hypothermia shelters will stay open from Friday at 7 a.m. through Saturday at 7 a.m., even while forecasts show moderate temperatures over that period. Certain recreation centers will likewise keep their doors open beginning Thursday at 7 p.m. D.C.’s low-barrier shelters opened this morning at 7 a.m.

A DHS spokeswoman says the agency has been distributing materials to those experiencing homelessness downtown that explain the services that will be available over the coming days. The District and the United Planning Organization are offering free transportation to shelters and day-time programs, although they note in literature that “traffic and street closures may make it difficult for vans to reach” destinations on Friday. D.C. is providing “limited temporary storage” for homeless individuals’ belongings, too. Case managers have been working around the clock to ensure safe relocations.

CHILDREN & FAMILIESCampaign Raises Nearly $4,000 To Screen Hidden Figures For Low-Income D.C. Children (Dcist, 1/18)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | A new mixed-use apartment building, where 78 units are designated for affordable housing, has opened near Rosslyn metro station (ARLnow, 1/18)

LGBTQ | LGBTQ activists and individuals hold a dance party protest near Vice President-elect Mike Pence’s D.C. home (WAMU, 1/19)

HEALTH | Prince George’s County’s future Regional Medical Center is facing funding issues again. (WBJ, 1/18)

TRANSIT | The Department of Justice is suing Metro because they rescinded an offer of employment after learning an applicant has epilepsy. (WaPo, 1/18)


When hip hop visited the White House…

-Kendra

The Daily will be back Monday!

January 18, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

ACA repeal would cost Maryland $2 billion

HEALTH | A new Department of Legislative Services report finds that repealing or revising the Affordable Care Act in Maryland would cost the state $2 billion in fiscal year 2018. This report comes a few days before the new administration, which stated their first priority would be replacing the Affordable Care Act, will be sworn in. (WBJ, 1/18)

Here are some of the potential effects of repeal-replace plans:

If enhanced federal funding is repealed, Maryland must decide whether to maintain and how to fund Medicaid expansion. The net cost to Maryland would be $1.27 billion in fiscal 2018, rising to $1.50 billion in fiscal 2022.

Loss of an enhanced matching rate for the Maryland Children’s Health Program would increase general fund spending by an estimated $68.0 million in fiscal 2018, $72.8 million in fiscal 2019, and $19.5 million in fiscal 2020.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– WRAG and the Enterprise Community Loan Fund are proud to announce we have raised $11 million through the Our Region, Your Investment initiative to prevent the displacement of more than 280 families and individuals. (Enterprise Blog, 1/12)

Related: Learn more about Our Region, Your Investment and how you or your organization can get involved.

– A new analysis found that Loudon County is facing a major housing shortage. (Loudoun Tribune, 1/3)

HUMAN RIGHTS
Column: An Alexandria neighborhood is planning ways to deal with a white nationalist neighbor. (WaPo, 1/18)

– A D.C. Councilmember would like to create a Muslim liaison unit within the Metropolitan Police Department. (Dcist, 1/17)

RACIAL EQUITY
– Michael Smith, Senior Director of Cabinet Affairs for President Obama’s initiative My Brother’s Keeper, discusses the program and its sustainability though the new administration. (Chronicle, 1/13 – subscription required)

– How Mass Incarceration Pushes Black Children Further Behind in School (Atlantic, 1/16)

PHILANTHROPY | Sheila Herrling, Senior Vice President of Social Innovation for Case Foundation, lists the reasons why women are a driving force in social good. (Case Foundation, 1/12)

NONPROFIT | D.C. Policy Center, a new business-minded policy center, to launch in D.C. at the end of February (WCP, 1/18)


Social Sector Job Openings

Nonprofit Project Accountant | Arabella Advisors – New!
Human Resources Manager | Arabella Advisors – New!
Program Officer, Early Care and Education | Washington Area Women’s Foundation – New!
Program Management Specialist | Do Good Institute, University of Maryland – New!
Manager, Gannett Foundation | Gannett Foundation – New!
Executive Assistant to the President (P/T) | ABFE – A Philanthropic Partnership for Black Communities – New!
Vice President of Membership and Development | ABFE – A Philanthropic Partnership for Black Communities – New!
Program Associate | ABFE – A Philanthropic Partnership for Black Communities – New!
Administrative Associate | Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers
Associate Director, Policy & Communications | Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers 
Administrative Associate
| Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers 
Manager, Operations & Programming
| Walker’s Legacy Foundation
Senior Associate, Engagement – Mid-Atlantic and Retail and Direct Bank markets
| Capital One
Executive Director
| Philanthropy Network Greater Philadelphia
Grants Coordinator
| La Clinica del Pueblo

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click the image below to access the calendar.


Have you seen this mini art around the area?

-Kendra

January 17, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

January 17th is the National Day of Racial Healing

RACIAL EQUITY | WRAG and a delegation of philanthropic leaders participated in W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Summit on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation last December. Out of that summit came a realization that racial healing is urgently needed for the whole nation, leading the Kellogg Foundation to launch the National Day of Racial Healing. WRAG President Tamara Copeland discusses the origin of this event and why it was important for our organization to participate. (Daily, 1/17)

It happened almost spontaneously. Last month, at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Summit on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation, the Foundation’s leadership and the almost 600 attendees recognized that, while the Kellogg initiative is a decade-long project, the current spirit in the country demanded an immediate focus on healing. In a move that underscores the power of philanthropy to be an agent for change, the Foundation called for a National Day of Racial Healing. They recognized both the personal pain felt by thousands across the country and the collective angst of a country caught in the throes of a widening and deepening racial divide. There must be a public recognition of the need to heal and the Kellogg Foundation had the national platform to call for that healing.

Today is that day – January 17th – the first National Day of Racial Healing.

In honor of the National Day of Racial Healing, staff of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers and the Washington AIDS Partnership share why we are each personally committed to racial healing. Watch our video here.

Related: What does a trip to California have to do with racial equity? (Daily, 1/10)

Also related: Gail Christopher, Senior Advisor and Vice President for Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, closed out WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table learning series last year. Watch her talk on the role of philanthropy in addressing racism and racial equity here.

IMMIGRATIONHere to Stay rally held this weekend to support local immigrants (WAMU, 1/16)

HIV/AIDS | Ron Daniels, a DC advocate who spearheaded a needle exchange program in the District, passed away last week. (WaPo, 1/12)

HOMELESSNESS | There’s a new housing facility in the District for homeless veterans and low-income residents. It’s the first of its kind in the country due to having full-time Veterans Affairs case managers. (WCP, 1/12)

GENTRIFICATION | An in-depth look at D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood where longtime residents, businesses and buildings confront the ongoing process of gentrification. (NPR, 1/16)

YOUTH | How Deloitte increases employee engagement with youth mentoring (Forbes, 1/12)

Related: To learn more about how corporations of all sizes and industries are leveraging youth mentoring to drive employee engagement, join over 1000 mentoring practitioners and philanthropic partners at the 2017 National Mentoring Summit in Washington, D.C. from February 1-3, 2017.

FOOD | SNAP participants in Maryland can now buy groceries online from Amazon (WTOP, 1/17)

HEALTH
– Live Healthy program allows Montgomery County residents to receive discounts on dental and health services. (Bethesda Beat, 1/13)

– District hospitals are preparing for the inauguration weekend (WBJ, 1/13)


Art enthusiasts! There’s a new installation coming to the Hirshhorn Museum.

-Kendra

January 17, 2017 / WRAG

January 17th is for racial healing

By Tamara Lucas Copeland
President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

It happened almost spontaneously. Last month, at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Summit on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation, the Foundation’s leadership and the almost 600 attendees recognized that, while the Kellogg initiative is a decade-long project, the current spirit in the country demanded an immediate focus on healing. In a move that underscores the power of philanthropy to be an agent for change, the Foundation called for a National Day of Racial Healing. They recognized both the personal pain felt by thousands across the country and the collective angst of a country caught in the throes of a widening and deepening racial divide. There must be a public recognition of the need to heal and the Kellogg Foundation had the national platform to call for that healing.

Today is that day – January 17th – the first National Day of Racial Healing.

Here at WRAG, not only do we recognize the power of philanthropy to lead, we share the Kellogg Foundation’s belief in the need for truth, racial healing and transformation. It is incumbent on our country to acknowledge the wounds created by racial, ethnic and religious bias, and then to heal as we build an equitable and just society.

The WRAG staff has given thought to what racial healing means to each of us. Click here to hear our thoughts.

January 11, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

D.C. Council wants to create more public restrooms for the homeless

HOMELESSNESS | There have been many solutions proposed to aid the District’s growing homeless population, including the development of shelters, and now the DC Council has started the year with a new one. Councilmember Brianne Nadeau introduced a bill to create more public restrooms for the homeless. (WCP, 1/10)

Ward 1 D.C. councilmember and newly minted Human Services Committee Chair Brianne Nadeau introduced a bill during the council’s first legislative session of the year that would establish a task force to study creating public restrooms to relieve needy residents. Although the measure is in large part intended to benefit the homeless—roughly 8,350 were counted last year—Nadeau says more public bathrooms could also help pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities. She says major cities in Europe and Asia are models.

As drafted, such a task force would consist of D.C. health, safety, and other officials as well as representatives from homeless services, urban planning, and civic organizations. Membership would be uncompensated, and the group would look at ways to “provide restroom facilities for free or for a nominal cost at all hours,” while also “incentiviz[ing] businesses to keep their restrooms open to the public.” It would recommend specific locations.

HOUSING
– D.C. to pay $1 million to settle families’ claims for homes taken by tax-lien program (WaPo, 1/10)

Many condo buildings east of the Anacostia are in trouble. Here’s why, and what can be done. (GGW, 1/10)

EVENTS | WRAG is excited to announce our 2017 Brightest Minds Series on a variety of critical topics that intersect with racial equity. The series is open to everyone.

Clotilde Perez-Bode Dedecker, President & CEO of the Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo – February 3, 2017

Roberta Uno, Director of Arts in a Changing America – March 29, 2017

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, Professor of Urban Policy and Health at The New School – June 7, 2017

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY | In his most recent blog post, Tim McClimon, President of the American Express Foundation and lead faculty member of the Institute for CSR, predicts this year’s top CSR trends.

Related: Registration for the 2017 Institute for CSR is now open. Check out who’s already registered, download an application, and peruse the curriculum here.

EDUCATION
– Loudoun School Board votes against adding sexual orientation or gender identity protections to its employment policy. (Loudoun Times, 1/11)

– Maryland school officials are investigating a ‘Kool Kids Klan’ petition that was passed around a high school last week. (WaPo, 1/10)

Supreme Court to decide: What level of education do public schools legally owe to students with disabilities? (WaPo, 1/10)


Here’s one way to promote pedestrian safety

-Kendra

 

January 10, 2017 / Kendra Allen, Editor

D.C. Mayor Bowser announces new fund for undocumented immigrants

IMMIGRATION | D.C. is going a step further in protecting its residents. After affirming the District as a sanctuary city a few weeks ago, Mayor Bowser has now announced a new fund to aid undocumented immigrants. The $500,000 fund, Immigrant Justice Legal Services Grant Program, will grant awards to nonprofits and defense lawyers who represent those facing deportation. (WaPo, 1/9)

The $500,000 fund will also help illegal immigrants in the District apply for asylum and will provide representation for those residing in the city legally with green cards to obtain permanent U.S. citizenship.

In a statement, Bowser said the District is “doubling down” on its status as a sanctuary city, where D.C. police have already been instructed to not cooperate with federal authorities working to deport residents.

“We must ensure that all District residents can take advantage of their federal and constitutional rights,” Bowser said. “If immigration enforcement changes and problems arise, DC’s immigrant population will have our support and the support of DC’s legal community.”

RACIAL EQUITY | Tamara Copeland, WRAG’s president, and fourteen Greater Washington philanthropic leaders attended W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation summit in December. Tamara shares why this group committed a full week to travel across the country to participate in this convening. (Daily, 1/10)

Related: Gail Christopher, Senior Advisor at W.K. Kellogg Foundation, discusses why their new initiative, the National Day of Racial Healing on January 17th, is necessary. (PND Blog, 1/6)

POVERTY | Study: One-quarter of Maryland families above federal poverty line, but can’t afford basic essentials (Baltimore Sun, 1/9)

NONPROFIT | With so many activities planned for next week’s inauguration, some area nonprofits are considering their plans, including the Latin American Youth Center. (WBJ, 1/10)

Related: Lori Kaplan, President and CEO of Latin American Youth Center, shares how the organization is tackling racism with its Community Organizing for Racial Equity (CORE) committee and how WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table materials have helped inform their work. (Daily, 1/4)

HOUSING | A new solution to an old, but pressing problem: an argument for turning abandoned office buildings into new housing. (GGW, 1/5)

GENTRIFICATION | New research finds that falling crime in a neighborhood could be a precursor to gentrification (NYT, 1/5)

EDUCATION | Results from a Montgomery County summer learning program geared towards low-income children shows improvement in reading and math skills. (Bethesda Beat, 1/9)


The playground in the fourth picture is made of dreams…

-Kendra

January 10, 2017 / WRAG

What does a trip to California have to do with racial equity?

By Tamara Lucas Copeland
President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

On Monday, December 2, 2016, I flew to Carlsbad, California with fourteen philanthropic leaders to attend a week-long summit hosted by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. We, along with almost six hundred others, had been invited to attend this intensive session on “Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation” (TRHT). The Greater Washington group was primed for this conversation, having been a part of WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table learning and training series. But even after being immersed in this work throughout 2016, this group still agreed to travel across the country to devote one full week to further expanding their understanding of racism and racial healing.

What does this say about the Greater Washington delegation?

These foundation and corporate giving executives fully recognized the importance of this topic, not only in and of itself, but as a precursor for addressing their various philanthropic priorities. They knew that the issue of racial inequity is much larger than the Greater Washington region and they saw value in being part of a national learning and action community, and an opportunity to help advance a burgeoning movement within philanthropy. And, most importantly, they recognized that their learning had only started with Putting Racism on the Table. The door to knowledge and action had definitely been opened in 2016, but this experience – a week of learning, from 8am – 9pm each day -, was the total immersion that moves one up a rung of knowledge, deepening understanding and commitment.

Today, the Greater Washington region is primed to be one of ten local communities working with the Kellogg Foundation and its national partners to explore the truth of racial injustice, to promote activities that lead to racial healing, and ultimately to transform society into one in which there is no hierarchy of human value. The details of how that partnership might actualize have not been determined as of yet, but the commitment of the leadership of the local philanthropic community to continuing this journey to racial equity cannot be questioned.

Thank you to the Greater Washington delegation (L to R)

Hanh Lee – Weissberg Foundation
Kelly Lynch – Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation
Mardell Moffett – The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Patricia Mathews* – Northern Virginia Health Foundation
David Bowers* – Enterprise Community Partners
Jennifer Lockwood-Shabat – Washington Area Women’s Foundation
Nat Williams – Hill-Snowdon Foundation
Yanique Redwood* – Consumer Health Foundation
Tonia Wellons – Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Rosie Allen-Herring – United Way of the National Capital Area
Tamara Copeland* – Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Ashley Williams – Wells Fargo
Terri Copeland – PNC Bank
Lynn Tadlock* – Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Nicky Goren*– Eugene and Agnes Meyer Foundation

  • WRAG Board members, as of December 2016.