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April 3, 2014 / Rebekah Seder, Editor

There are 5 jobs available for every unemployed veteran

VETERANS | The Post continues its excellent series on veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan today with an in-depth look at veteran unemployment. Unemployment among 25-34 year old veterans remains a couple percentage points higher than the general population, despite a remarkable number of major commitments from corporations to hire veterans:

Add up all the pledges, and they total more than 1 million jobs for a population of unemployed post-Sept. 11-era veterans that is estimated most months by the Bureau of Labor Statistics at 210,000.

The math is overwhelming: There are now about five pledged jobs for every unemployed service member who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan.

It also raises some questions:

If there really are more than 1 million jobs out there, why isn’t every Iraq and Afghanistan war veteran employed? Is there a problem with what the companies are doing? Might it have something to do with the veterans themselves?

Related: Veterans often encounter unique challenges when they start their first civilian job. Last year WRAG members interested in more effectively supporting veterans in our region met with an HR expert in military transitions to learn about the issue, and ways philanthropy can promote better hiring and on-boarding policies to ease these transitions. (Daily, Sept. 2013)

BUDGET
– Mayor Gray released his 2015 budget proposal this morning, and there are lots of spending proposals of note, including a cost-of-living bump for TANF recipients, $2 million toward programs focused on helping families avoid homelessness, and another $4.7 million toward homeless veterans. (WaPo, 4/3)

Gray Excludes Funds For College Scholarship Program From 2015 Budget (WAMU, 4/3)

COMMUNITY | The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum has announced a $30 million gift from Boeing that will support educational activities and exhibitions, including a major renovation of its main hall. (DCist, 4/3)

EDUCATION
– Loudoun County chooses Eric Williams as new schools superintendent (WaPo, 4/2)

Maybe paying for good grades is not so bad, says the Post‘s Jay Mathews after the number of students taking AP exams in area schools significantly increased when students and teachers were paid for high scores. (WaPo, 3/30)

WORKFORCE | Md. minimum-wage bill clears key Senate hurdle; implementation would take until 2018 (WaPo, 4/3)


Via Ghosts of DC, here’s a kind of odd promo video for Washington from the 1930s. It’s 6 minutes of back-to-back terrible jokes, but the footage is pretty cool.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back to being almost daily on Tuesday. 

– Rebekah

 

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