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April 8, 2014 / Rebekah Seder, Editor

An “unintended consequence” of healthcare law impacts community health centers

HEALTHCARE | Local community health clinics, like Mary’s Center, are having a hard time competing with MedStar, the for-profit health care provider, as it expands into the the community with new primary care facilities. In the long-term, this could threaten the clinics’ financial stability and ability to continue serving the uninsured. (WaPo, 4/7):

The tension is an unintended consequence of the health-care law, which has set off an intense competition for a growing number of privately insured patients, who tend to be the best-paying customers. Under the law, thousands of people in the Washington area and millions across the country are getting coverage for the first time. That has prompted a variety of health providers to move into neighborhoods that were once the exclusive turf of community health centers, which are designed primarily for low-income patients.

For many consumers, having additional places to get medical care will provide more choice and convenience, health experts say. But community health centers worry that the bigger providers will siphon off the insured, leaving them with more uninsured patients. That, they say, would imperil them financially and hurt the people who have no other place to get care — including illegal immigrants and others who won’t benefit from the health-care law.

FOOD | A couple weeks back, the Washington Regional Convergence Partnership – now the Washington Regional Food Funders – provided testimony in support of more coordination of food policy in the District. Elevation DC reports on the hearing and what a food policy director could do to further work to improve food access in the city. (Elevation, 4/8)

Related: The Washington Regional Food Funders remain interested in advocacy for good food. Today they share this report from the first ever regional gathering of food policy councils and coalitions they hosted last fall and talked about at the hearing.

POVERTY | Silver Spring is characteristic of the growing “suburbanization” of poverty, with a number of nonprofit organizations reporting a big increase in the number of people they serve over the past few years. (WAMU, 4/4)

HOUSING
What do solar panels have to do with affordable housing? A lot. (Elevation DC, 4/8)

City Looks to Restart Park Morton Redevelopment (CP, 4/4)

The Search for Affordable Housing Is Pushing the Middle Class to the Exurbs (Atlantic, 4/8)

Related: This is an issue we looked at last year with an edition of What Funders Need to Know that looked at why philanthropy should focus on supporting housing affordability close to transit.

WORKFORCE | A new report from DC Appleseed says that the District’s job training programs are failing to meet the needs of District residents. The report calls for additional workforce training funding and better coordination among District agencies that work on adult education. (WAMU, 4/4)

EDUCATION
Obama announces federal grants to help prepare students for careers (WaPo, 4/7)

D.C. mayoral primary has Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson’s future up in the air (WaPo, 4/3)

GIVING | Tomorrow, April 9, is Spring2ACTion, Alexandria’s annual day of giving. This year’s goal is to raise $1 million for Alexandria nonprofits. More information here.

TRANSIT | Suuuuuuure. (WBJ, 4/7)


If this isn’t an argument for getting rid of D.C.’s height limit, I don’t know what is.

– Rebekah

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