Skip to content
March 12, 2015 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Affordable housing does a disappearing act in the District

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute has released their new report titled, Going, Going, Gone: DC’s Vanishing Affordable Housing. The report examines the urgency of the affordable housing crisis and offers a glimpse into the lives of those who are struggling to keep up with rapidly rising rents. (DCFPI, 3/12)

Rents have risen rapidly for virtually all residents. The impact has been greatest on low-income households who have not benefited from DC’s recent economic growth. Increasingly, moderate-income households also struggle to afford rent and utilities.

– Two-thirds of low-income households – with incomes under $32,000 for a family of four – spend more than half their income on housing.

– Even renters with incomes up to $54,000 are struggling, as one in three of these households pays the majority of its income towards rent.

Use It or Lose it: A Legislative Tool to Save Affordable Housing Hasn’t Been Funded (WCP, 3/11)

COMMUNITY/CSR | In this post, a member of The Boeing Company‘s Global Corporate Citizenship Team shares how a collaboration with the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, business leaders, and stakeholders, has resulted in significant investments and programming that will bring lasting change to the region. (CFNOVA, 3/11)

FOOD | A new survey takes a look at which schools across the country are purchasing healthy foods locally to feed their students. One surprising find from the survey was that the biggest agricultural states were not among the ones serving the most local food. States including Delaware, Maine, Maryland and Vermont lead the pack. (NPR, 3/11)

ECONOMY | In light of budget season, D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute also recently explored some of the challenges Mayor Bowser will face as she crafts her first budget. More revenue will be necessary to avoid deep cuts for residents in the District. (DCFPI, 3/10)

Related: On Wednesday, April 1 at 1:00 PM, WRAG members are invited to attend a two-part briefing on the 2016 budget and how changes at the federal and local level may affect their work. The event will begin with an overview of the 2016 federal budget by Robert Greenstein, president of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and will continue with breakout discussions for each jurisdiction, featuring:

District of Columbia:  Ed Lazere, Executive Director, DC Fiscal Policy Institute
Maryland:  Benjamin Orr, Executive Director, Maryland Center on Economic Policy
Virginia:  Michael Cassidy, President and CEO, The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis

ENVIRONMENT/ANACOSTIA RIVER
– Want to know more about the forthcoming 11th Street Bridge Project that seeks to connect a long-divided community? You can learn more about the District’s first elevated park here. (WaPo, 3/8)

– The Environmental Film Festival kicking off next week will feature a film on the challenges and efforts to make the Anacostia River more suitable for future generations. The film, produced by Stone Soup Films with support from the Summit Fund of Washington, will have several screenings at programs sponsored by the Bernstein Family Foundation and Booz Allen Hamilton.

Related: On Thursday, March 19 at 10:30 AM, WRAG members and invited guests will gather to take a look at the challenges and opportunities of a cleaner Anacostia River. Eligible attendees interested in the environmental health of the watershed or the economic health of the communities along the riverbank can share their thoughts on how philanthropy can continue to catalyze the transformation of the Anacostia.

PHILANTHROPY/EVENTS | Next week begins the second annual Philanthropy Week in Washington – a week-long series of events and activities that highlight the role of philanthropy in our society – hosted by the Council on Foundations. This year, the center piece event will be Foundations on the Hill, hosted in partnership with the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers. Click here to check out the week’s schedule of events.


College basketball enthusiasts aren’t the only ones who may lose out on money during March Madness.

– Ciara

%d bloggers like this: