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April 27, 2015 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Caring for a growing population of seniors

WORKFORCE/AGING
By the year 2030, about one-in-four U.S. adults will be seniors age 65 or older. As the population ages, the need for quality home-care workers is growing, while their salaries and training requirements are not. (Atlantic, 4/27)

[…] the resources to help seniors stay at home are shrinking. Many seniors are finding that their boomer children are staying in the workforce longer than they did, and are unable to care for them. Demand for direct-care workers is expected to grow 37 percent between 2012 and 2022. Demand for personal care aides alone—the entry-level workers in the field—will grow 49 percent. There are currently 3.5 million direct-care workers in the country, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Seven years from now, there will be 1.3 million more.

[…]

On average, home care aides work 34 hours a week, and make an average of $17,000 a year. One in four live in households below the federal poverty line, and one in three doesn’t have health care because their employer doesn’t offer it or because they can’t afford it.Perhaps unsurprisingly, the field has a high rate of turnover—some estimates put it as high as 60 percent.

Of the ten occupations that added the most new jobs in 2012, personal-care aides earned less than all except for fast-food workers, according to the Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute.

Related: In 2013, WRAG published an edition of What Funders Need to Know about the challenges facing this critical workforce. (Daily, June 2013)

CSR 
– Ashley Williams, a UMD graduate student who has been working at Capital One since September through WRAG’s Philanthropy Fellows program, reflects on what she has learned during her fellowship about building partnerships between corporate and nonprofit organizations and aligning business strategy and community need. (Daily, 4/27)

WRAG Members: WRAG’s Philanthropy Fellows program is an exclusive partnership with the University of Maryland’s Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership. Through the program, WRAG connects our member organizations with UMD students studying philanthropy and nonprofit leadership at the School of Public Policy. Applications to host a Philanthropy Fellow are due by Friday, May 8. Learn more about the program and how to participate here.

– Last week, WRAG held the first Fundamentals of CSR workshop – a two-day event for individuals wanting to better understand the field of corporate responsibility, corporate philanthropy, and corporate community involvement. Here’s a special thank you to those who helped make the event a big success!

INEQUALITY 
– Income inequality is not just a problem for those in poverty; it’s a growing problem that affects everyone. Economic experts weigh in on some possible ways to begin tackling the widening gap. (The Baltimore Sun, 4/26)

– Forcing Black Men Out of Society (NYT, 4/25)

TRANSIT | Greater Greater Washington has released some new, interactive graphs that show the accessibility of the region’s metro stations to jobs and living spaces. (GGW, 4/24)

IMMIGRATION | Opinion: Think of Undocumented Immigrants as Parents, Not Problems (NYT, 4/27)


Do you communicate through emojis on your smartphone? Find out which ones are being used the most around the world.  

– Ciara

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