Skip to content
May 21, 2015 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Erratic work schedules often impact women most

WORKFORCE
A new study from the Center for Popular Democracy finds that women tend to be hit the hardest by the unstable hours and wages that are often a part of hourly work (City Lab, 5/20):

They are more likely to work jobs that pay on an hourly basis, according to the report, at 61 percent compared to 56 percent of men. In particular, women of color dominate the hourly workforce: They are twice as likely to work in an hourly job as in a salaried one, while white women are 1.4 times more likely.

Working part-time (less than 34 hours per week) further exacerbates the domino effects of irregular scheduling. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, in 2010, 26.6 percent of women worked part time, compared to just 13.4 percent of men. About half of all women who work hourly part-time jobs do so because of childcare issues, family obligations, or their own educational commitments.

[…]

Such work/life volatility amounts to tremendous stress, which in turn can impact a worker’s ability to sleep, and her overall health—plus, that of her children.

Opinion: The ‘low-wage recovery’ is a myth (WaPo, 5/20)

EVENTS | The England Family Foundation is hosting a donor briefing on the 11th Street Bridge Park on May 28th at the Anacostia Arts Center from 9:30 AM – 11:15 AM, followed by a walking tour of the site. This briefing is for donors only, but is not exclusively for WRAG members. Please contact Julia Baer-Cooper for details and to RSVP.

YOUTH/SOCIAL JUSTICE | The Public Welfare Foundation shares some takeaways from a recent sit-down with two experts who are working to tackle disparities in youth and adult incarceration in innovative ways. (Public Welfare Foundation, 5/19)

DISTRICT | Poll: D.C. residents favor mayor’s sales tax increase (WaPo, 5/21)

TRANSIT | Cities Need Great Transit All Day, Not Just For Rush-Hour (City Lab, 5/20)


In this battle of man vs. machine, a reporter faces off against an automated program to craft a news story. Who do you think won?

– Ciara

%d bloggers like this: