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August 10, 2015 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Wide disparities in economic recovery persist

WORKFORCE
As the country continues to move toward economic recovery, unemployment rates continue to vary widely among racial and ethnic groups. (Atlantic, 8/7)

Currently the national unemployment rate for white Americans is about 4.6, for Hispanics, it’s 6.5, and for blacks, 9.1. Those numbers are strikingly worse.

For white Americans unemployment is back to pre-recession levels, or lower, in 14 states—and within 1 percentage point of pre-recession norms in another 28. African Americans, by contrast, remain the furthest away from their pre-recession levels. In Arkansas, Illinois, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina, the unemployment gap is more than two and a half times as large as the rate for white Americans. In Washington D.C., it’s five times as high. This year is the first since then that the national unemployment rate for black Americans  has dipped below the double-digit mark—and that feat has only been accomplished in 11 states. The lowest state unemployment rate for black Americans—6.9 percent, in Tennessee—is equivalent to the rate of white unemployment in West Virginia, the state with the highest share of jobless white Americans in the country.

– The surprising number of parents scaling back at work to care for kids (WaPo, 8/6)

POVERTY | Opinion: What Do the Poor Need? Try Asking Them (NYT, 8/8)

HOMELESSNESS 
– DC Fiscal Policy Institute takes a look at the opportunities the District has to utilize Medicaid to help homeless individuals secure stable housing. (DCFPI, 8/7)

– Fairfax County has undertaken a new, attention-getting effort to bring awareness to homelessness in an affluent area. Officials hope placing lifelike mannequins in various locations with signs that tell their stories will help to break down commonly-held stigmas. (WaPo, 8/8)

DISTRICT | D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser shares month-by-month highlights from her first six months in office with a newly-released progress report.


Let’s pretend for a moment that each day of the week is a person. Here’s how a meeting might go.

-Ciara

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