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November 9, 2015 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Childcare costs are high. Wages for childcare workers are not.

CHILDCARE/WORKFORCE
There have been a number of studies on just how expensive childcare is for families in the District compared with the rest of the country. While many low-income and middle-class families struggle to afford to keep their children enrolled in care, most of those providing childcare services cannot afford it themselves. (Atlantic, 11/5)

On average, these women (it’s almost entirely women) are paid significantly less than the average American worker and are twice as likely to live in poverty, a new study released by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) found. The median hourly wage for childcare workers in the U.S. is $10.39, nearly 40 percent below the median hourly wage of workers in other occupations. Even when accounting for the demographic makeup of the childcare industry—workers are more likely to be minorities, much more likely to be women, and less likely to have a bachelor’s or advanced degree—their earnings were still 23 percent lower than in other occupations. Childcare workers also had less access to benefits, such as health insurance and retirement funds, than people employed in other fields.

ECONOMY/REGION | Five reasons to be concerned about Washington’s economy (WaPo, 11/9)

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS | A new housing development in Southeast D.C. aims to be a model in sustainability and a refuge for low-income and homeless families in need of permanent housing. (WaPo, 11/6)

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– Following data from a 2012 study showing that American teens score low on financial literacy, districts in Northern Virginia strive to keep students ahead of the curve with new requirements for economics and personal-finance courses for high schoolers. (WaPo, 11/1)

– A recent study on child development finds that children develop a sense of self esteem earlier than previously thought – even before they have begun to attend school. (WaPo, 11/6)

FOOD/POVERTY | For years, researchers have linked the inability for many low-income individuals to maintain healthy nutritional habits to food deserts, but recent studies say poor eating habits have less to do with proximity and more to do with income. (Atlantic, 11/9)

ARTS & HUMANITIES
– The Nonprofit Finance Fund has released two reports – one for grantmakers and another for arts organizations – summarizing lessons learned about capitalization in the arts sector. (NFF, 10/2015)

Nonprofit theaters are attracting more donors, but audiences keep shrinking, report says (LA Times, 11/5)


French artists from 100 years ago, we have failed you.

– Ciara

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