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February 4, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

How growing up in a poor neighborhood can impact boys and girls differently

GENDER/SOCIAL MOBILITY
A new analysis examines how childhood environment can impact social mobility for boys and girls. The study looks at how boys and girls from the same poor neighborhood are often affected very differently by their surroundings, with boys often experiencing tougher circumstances (City Lab, 2/3):

The researchers analyzed tax records of 10,000 U.S. citizens born between 1980 and 1982 once they turned 30, as well as economic and social data on their parents while they were growing up. Their findings “demonstrate that gender gaps in adulthood have roots in childhood, perhaps because childhood disadvantage is especially harmful for boys.” The findings are significant not just in understanding how place matters for social mobility of men and women, but for explaining trends about the U.S. labor force as a whole.

Related: WRAG is kicking off our 2016 Brightest Minds series, supported by JP Morgan Chase, in which thought leaders share ideas that may make you think about your communities and work in whole new ways. Check out this year’s exciting line-up which includes speaker Eldar Shafir, who will be discussing poverty’s influence on cognition and decision-making. WRAG’s Brightest Minds programs are open to the public.

EDUCATION | This fall, 10 new D.C. Public Schools will begin an extended school year in an effort to combat summer learning loss – a big problem for many children from low-income families. Those schools will join the more than 40 schools in the DCPS system that already have extended days. (WAMU, 2/3)

Related: WRAG is also excited to roll out our 2016 Public Education Speaker Series, supported by the Omega Foundation and and the Tiger Woods Foundation, on a variety of critical topics facing students today. Education Funders: Click here to learn more about the series and to register. Please, note that these programs are open to grantmakers only.

PHILANTHROPY
– A new, first-of-its-kind resource, The Almanac of American Philanthropy, serves as a definitive guide of the “power and cultural importance of American giving.” The book is produced by The Philanthropy Roundtable and features information on great achievements in American philanthropy, the most influential donors, significant ideas, and more. (Philanthropy Roundtable, 2/4)

– The Atlas of Giving estimates a 2.6 percent rise in charitable giving in 2016. (Chronicle, 2/3)

Could Giving Circles Rebuild Philanthropy from the Bottom Up? (NPQ, 2/4)

ARTS | In Ward 8, the Anacostia Arts Center, often considered one of the area’s “best-kept secrets,” shows much promise for the surrounding neighborhood’s growth. (WaPo, 1/28)


Were any of these books featured on your college syllabus?

– Ciara 

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