Skip to content
February 25, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Complicated cases for Central American migrants to the U.S.

IMMIGRATION
For the many Central American migrants who have fled their homes to come to the United States, immigration court cases can often come down to a single question (WAMU, 2/25):

When is a migrant a refugee?

[…]

Since about 2009, many more Central American migrants — including many minors — are making the trip north and seeking asylum.

The reasons for the increase are fairly easy to explain. They parallel the ebb and flow of violent crime in the region. As the homicide rate spiked in Mexico, so did asylum applications; as San Pedro Sula became the murder capital of the world, asylum applications from Honduras increased. The U.N.’s refugee agency has interviewed hundreds ofwomen and children who have crossed the U.S. border over the past couple of years, and a vast majority of them said they were fleeing violence from organized crime.

– Consumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar, discusses the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids that began in January, and the opportunity the philanthropic community has to get involved. (CHF, 2/24)

– Amid reports that a number of families in the school system have grown fearful of sending their children to school for risk of deportation, Arlington Public Schools are working to reassure worried parents. (WaPo, 2/25)

RACIAL EQUITY
– Rose Ann Cleveland, executive director of The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation and a member of the WRAG board, candidly shares her experience of witnessing racial inequality growing up in North Carolina, and how she came to realize that society treated certain people differently. (Daily, 2/25)

Opinion: When it comes to the highly-publicized #OscarsSoWhite controversy – in which movie fans and members of the entertainment industry’s workforce have openly criticized the lack of diversity in Hollywood – some parallels can be drawn to the lack of diversity within the social profit sector, according to one CEO.  (Chronicle, 2/25)

PHILANTHROPY | Exponent Philanthropy, the Fund for Shared Insight, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy present the next video in their new series called Philanthropy Lessons, in which funders share their experiences and what they’ve learned in their philanthropic careers. Check out the video and stay tuned for more through June.

COMMUNITY
– The Fund for Children, Youth, and Families at The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region is accepting request for proposals. Proposals must be submitted through the online application system no later than 4:00 PM, Thursday, March 31, and final grant decisions will be announced in August. Eligibility requirements, proposal guidelines, and submission instructions are available at http://www.fund4cyf.org.

 The Community Food Rescue Mini-Grants Program, available to help social profit organizations build infrastructure and increase capacity for the food recovery system, is accepting applications until March 1.For more information, contact Astoria Aviles.

ECONOMY
– Eighteen months following the opening of the first stations along WMATA’s Silver Line, economic development surrounding the stations is said to be taking off. (Inside NoVa, 2/23)

–  Low-Income Programs Not Driving Nation’s Long-Term Fiscal Problem (CBPP, 2/24)


Did you read today’s post while sitting at your desk eating lunch? Stop doing that! We’ll be here when you get back.

– Ciara

%d bloggers like this: