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March 17, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

How segregation leads to shorter lifespans

EQUITY
Yesterday, new County Health Rankings were released with an added measure on racial segregation in America’s counties, in recognition of the fact that segregation has profound effects on an individual’s health outcomes. Evidence shows that racial segregation is making and keeping people sick. (Atlantic, 3/16)

Bridget Catlin, the co-director of the County Health Rankings, said segregation wreaks havoc on the body primarily by stressing it out. In addition to experiencing more violent crime, people in racially segregated pockets might be stranded further from good jobs or the transportation necessary to reach them.

The data might help explain why African Americans fare worse across various health metrics. The average life expectancy for African Americans is still four years shorter than for whites, for example.

– Racism and sexism can present themselves in various aspects of daily life, but the one thing that is probably most expected to be bias-free is surprisingly not – computer programs. Algorithms for computer programs are revealing some unpleasant truths about the ways in which biases persist. (NPR, 3/15)

ARTS | The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Age-Friendly D.C., and the District Department of Transportation have announced a $40,000 grant dedicated to public art with an anti-street harassment message. (DCist, 3/15)

PHILANTHROPY
– President & CEO of the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers David Biemesderfer, was named one of the Top 25 Most Influential Philanthropy & Social Innovation Experts in the Business of Giving Newsletter, published by Philanthropy Media. Congratulations!

Related: In January, new to his role as president and CEO at the Forum, David shared with our readers why he was excited to take the helm of the organization and to support the work of WRAG and our regional association colleagues. (Daily, 1/27)

What Young Donors Respond to Today (Gelman, Rosenberg, and Freedman, 3/9)

INFRASTRUCTURE
– Opinion: We caused the Metro shutdown when we decided to let our cities decay (WaPo, 3/16)

– Though millennials have flocked to cities in droves for years, history and data show that is likely to change at some point. Here’s a look at how cities can prepare for the inevitable population loss. (City Lab, 3/16)


A missed opportunity has bewildered the region.

– Ciara

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