Skip to content
April 4, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Protecting the future of arts spaces

ARTS 
Washington City Paper examines the controversial conversion of 411 New York Ave NE, the home of Union Arts and a long-time DIY arts venue in D.C. that provides affordable space for organizations, visual artists, and underground musicians, into a luxury hotel that, as currently planned, will have a limited supply of studio space available to artists. The organized pushback against the development highlights the severe shortage of affordable space for artists and musicians to live, practice, perform, and work in D.C. (and elsewhere in the region) – and the irony that robust arts and culture scenes contribute to the rising real estate values that push artists out (WCP, 4/1):

[The] hotel project might fit into Mayor Muriel Bowser’s stated goal of “support[ing] and expand[ing] the District’s creative economy,” but for many of the artist tenants of 411 New York Ave. NE and members of the broader arts community, it dissolves a cherished, vibrant, and important arts space. To them, it’s cultural displacement.

To them, this isn’t a struggle to save a building, but a fight to save the future of D.C.’s underground arts communities.

When few question the value of the creative economy to the overall vibrancy of our region, this situation raises important questions about how government, businesses and developers, artists, and funders can preserve and create spaces for artists.

COMMUNICATIONS | On the heels of Twitter’s recent 10th birthday, I ask the question, “What’s the fuss about Twitter?” and explain why you (or the leader of your organization) should start tweeting now. (Daily 4/4)

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND explores the realities of mixed-income housing in the region and the benefits these strategies have actually had for the area’s low-income residents. (Helping Hands Blog, 4/1)

REGION/WORKFORCE | As National Harbor in Prince George’s County continues to grow into an employment core and regional destination, a transit line linking the hub to Alexandria remains absent. The adjacent communities have yet to compromise on a specific route or funding for a transit project, further underscoring the need for regional cooperation in order to avoid hindering the economic potential of the area and service workers’ ability to commute. (WaPo, 4/1)

COMMUNITY 
– The CareFirst open grant application deadline for 2016 is June 13 at 11:59 PM. 501(c)(3) organizations can submit their online applications in support of health-related services or innovative programs. Find out more here.

– The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments is one of 10 organizations from across the U.S. selected administer a three-year USDA initiative called FoodLINC (Leveraging Investment for Network Coordination) to strengthen the region’s local food business sector, while expanding consumer access to healthy, local food. Agua Fund and Prince Charitable Trusts are philanthropic partners. Read more here.

EQUITY | Lately, due to a number of incidents in the news, many voices are calling for more police officers to be required to wear body cameras. But even with camera footage, there is often debate as to what the videos actually portray. The New York Times presents an exercise in a phenomenon known as “camera perspective bias.” (NYT, 4/1)

PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: Now or Forever: Rethinking Foundation Life Spans (Chronicle, 3/30)

JOBS | Arabella Advisors seeks a qualified candidate for the position of Associate Director, Consulting Services for their Good Food team.


Are you ready for some baseball? Test your knowledge of the sport with this quiz.

– Ciara

%d bloggers like this: