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April 20, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Exploring the five types of poverty

POVERTY/RACE
For years, researchers have attempted to better understand poverty by looking at the series of circumstances that allow it to persist, rather than attributing it to one defining factor. A new report hones in on five proposed types of poverty, and examines how these categories disproportionately affect Americans based on race. (City Lab, 4/16)

The paper, builds on research from the British economist William Beveridge, who in 1942 proposed five types of poverty: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness, and disease. In modern terms, these could be defined as poverty related to housing, education, income, employment, and healthcare, respectively. Analyzing the 2014 American Community Survey, the paper’s co-authors, Richard Reeves, Edward Rodrigue, and Elizabeth Kneebone, found that half of Americans experience at least one of these types of poverty, and around 25 percent suffer from at least two.

But the likelihood of living a life that includes more than one of these types of poverty is significantly higher for minorities.

– How American oligarchs created the concept of race to divide and conquer the poor (WaPo, 4/19)

– The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans (Atlantic, 4/18)

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY | Jessica Finkel, Philanthropy Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, shares how her experience working with the organization’s Community Benefit department has helped her uncover a passion for policy and public health. (Daily, 3/20)

Related for WRAG Members: We are currently accepting applications from WRAG members interested in hosting Philanthropy Fellows this fall. For more information about this program and how to apply, click here.

COMMUNITY/RACIAL EQUITY 
– Today is 4/20, also known as ‘National Weed Day’. While enthusiasts in a growing number of states may now be able to legally celebrate or profit from this day, Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood uses this opportunity to discuss how marijuana-related incarcerations have devastated communities of color for years. She also cites points from WRAG’s recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, featuring speaker James Bell, J.D. of the W. Haywood Burns Institute. (CHF, 4/20)

PHILANTHROPY | The concept of “power” can often be a difficult one to navigate, as those who have it don’t always use it for good – or even at all. Exponent Philanthropy‘s Andy Carroll explains what bold power in action looks like in the world of philanthropy. (PhilanthroFiles, 4/19)

HEALTH
– The World Health Organization is expanding their focus on mental health, with hopes that more countries will also begin to view mental illness as a high priority global threat. (NPR, 4/13)

– Some states are passing religious freedom bills that provide protection to people of faith unwilling to provide goods or services to LGBT individuals, and these laws can also have severe consequences on how (and if) people seek care from physicians and therapists. (Atlantic, 4/19)

WORKFORCE | Lack of Training for Young Nonprofit Workers Means Too Few Potential Leaders (Chronicle, 4/19) Subscription required

EDUCATION
– See how high schools in the region stacked up on the 2016 U.S. News and World Report rankings of the country’s best high schools.

– Why America’s Schools Have A Money Problem (NPR, 4/18)


Views on dating have changed quite a bit since 1939.

– Ciara

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