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May 3, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

New video is live – Putting Racism on the Table: Implicit Bias

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG
The third video in the Putting Racism on the Table series is now live! The video features Julie Nelson, director of the Government Alliance on Race & Equity at the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, speaking on implicit bias. After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series or on the specific topic via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland had this to say of the new release:

We are halfway through the video releases from WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series! We appreciate you continuing to share your thoughts from the Professor john a. powell installment on structural racism, and the Dr. Robin DiAngelo installment on white privilege. We hope you’ll keep the conversation going with this latest release, as Julie Nelson highlights the ways in which bias and racism play out at the individual, institutional, and structural levels.

COMMUNITY
– The Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier CountiesGive Choose day, a 24-hour fundraising campaign for 60 area social profit organizations, is in full swing!

– The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities is seeking advisory review panelists for its upcoming grant season. D.C residents can nominate themselves or their peers to serve. Find out more about the opportunity here.

– The Healthcare Initiative Foundation has awarded a $100,000 grant to Mobile Medical Care, Inc. (MobileMed) and Aspire Counseling to support a collaborative program providing integrated behavioral health services for underserved Montgomery County residents.

EDUCATION/POVERTY
A recent study by Stanford researchers finds that students in school districts with the highest concentrations of poverty score an average of four grade levels below their more affluent peers in the richest school districts. The study also finds large achievement gaps between white students and their African American and Hispanic classmates, especially in places where there are large economic disparities. (NYT, 4/29)

WORKFORCE/EQUITY
– AudioLocal D.C. STEM Careers Are Soaring – But For Whom? (WAMU, 5/3)

– A new report looks at the links between higher hourly wages and lower rates of crime. According to projections in the report, “raising the minimum wage to $12 by 2020 would result in a 3 to 5 percent crime decrease (250,000 to 510,000 crimes) and a societal benefit of $8 to $17 billion dollars.” (Atlantic, 5/3)


Want to learn how to prepare cuter, faster (and I do mean very cute and very fast)  meals? This is the cooking show for you.

– Ciara

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