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June 9, 2016 / Ciara Myers, Editor

Where expenses for those in poverty continue to add up

POVERTY
We already know that living in poverty can lead to exorbitant costs for families, and now, researchers are looking into what has come to be known as “energy poverty” – paying more than six percent of a household’s income on energy-related expenses (Atlantic, 6/8):

The threshold beyond which experts believe energy ceases to be “affordable” is 6 percent of a household’s income. But for many lower-income households, even with declining energy prices, paying less than that benchmark is a fantasy. DeAndrea Newman Salvador, an economist and the founder of The Renewable Energy Transition Initiative, a nonprofit, studied the cost of home utilities in her native North Carolina and found that energy expenditures among low-earning households were staggeringly high.

[…]

Citing data from the Department of Health and Human Services, Salvador added that the disparity was particularly prevalent among “people who were below 50 percent of the poverty level.” She found that many in this group “were spending roughly 35 percent of their income toward home-energy bills.”

– With new research showing that, without any other social service interventions, children in poverty do better as adults when they move to low-poverty neighborhoods, DC Fiscal Policy Institute breaks down why creating more mixed-income neighborhoods in the city is so important. (DCFPI, 6/8)

– The big problem with one of the most popular assumptions about the poor (WaPo, 6/8)

COMMUNITY | Former program officer at Exponent Philanthropy Hanh Le joins the Weissberg Foundation as their new executive director. Learn more about Hanh and the foundation’s participation in the Putting Racism on the Table series! (Weissberg, 6/7)

HOMELESSNESS/YOUTH | Funders Together to End Homelessness CEO Amanda Andere shares some key action items she went home with after attending the recent White House Policy Briefing on Youth Homelessness. (Funders Together, 6/9)

WORKFORCE/RACIAL JUSTICE | On Consumer Health Foundation‘s blog, former board member Liz Ben-Ishai interviews Ron Harris of the the Twin Cities-based group Neighborhoods Organizing for Change, where they discuss the intersections of race and the fair job scheduling movement. (CHF, 6/9)

PHILANTHROPY/IMPACT INVESTING
– Jean Case, CEO of the Case Foundation, takes on four big myths about impact investing. (Case, 6/8)

– OpinionImpact Investing: 5 Lessons for Putting Your Money Where Your Mission Is (Chronicle, 6/9) Subscription required


Find out what everyone else has been watching on Netflix.

– Ciara

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