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December 12, 2016 / Kendra Allen, Editor

New report on potential healthcare workforce in the region

WORKFORCE | Healthcare and information technology jobs in our region are growing, but most of these careers require postsecondary education, which means many in our region cannot take advantage of the opportunity. A new report, by the Greater Washington Workforce Development Collaborative (an initiative of The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region) and JP Morgan Chase, looks at how we can address the skill gap and help more low-income residents into these careers.

With over 70% of net new jobs requiring post-secondary education and training, the Washington regional economy continues to be highly knowledge-based. Local employers, however, face challenges in finding skilled workers. Nearly 800,000 individuals in our region have no education past high school, highlighting a skills gap that has the potential to undermine our region’s global economic competitiveness.

Further, while it is encouraging that our regional unemployment rate has improved to pre-Great Recession levels, many of our neighbors are still struggling to make ends meet. Our region can count 100,000 additional residents living below the Federal poverty level since 2009. African American or Latino workers in the region are three times more likely to earn an income below the poverty level. Addressing our region’s race, ethnicity, and gender-based income inequality is a critical challenge for our region to tackle if we want to ensure that all in our region have a fair shot for prosperity.

RACISM
– WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland writes about how she likes to collect Santa ornaments from around the world – and how, in local shops, she’s never found a black Santa ornament. (Daily, 12/12)

 The rise of racial hate graffiti in Montgomery County, especially in elementary schools, has surprised officials and residents, forcing them to look for solutions. (WaPo, 12/12)

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | D.C. Residents Discuss Quality of Life Issues in Ward 7 (AFRO, 12/7)

FOOD/POVERTY | Op-Ed: Food insecurity touches 1 in 4 children in D.C., mostly in Wards 7 and 8. Patty Stonsifer, head of Martha’s Table, discusses how they are addressing the issue and what the city must do. (WaPo, 12/9)

TRANSIT | Metro Enters First Partnership With Uber In Bid To Boost Sagging Ridership (WAMU, 12/9)

HOUSINGArlington now has rules for Airbnb rentals, just in time for Inauguration Day (WBJ, 12/12)

INCOME INEQUALITYSevere Inequality Is Incompatible With the American Dream (Atlantic, 12/12)

JUSTICE | The new director of the Mayor’s Office of Returning Citizen Affairs is uniquely qualified to head the department as a returning citizen and a D.C. native. (WaPo, 12/12)


Check out these fascinating 103 conversations with workers in the U.S. about their jobs.

-Kendra

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