How these queer youth became entrepreneurs

LGBTQIA/BUSINESS | Last month, a local nonprofit, Supporting and Mentoring Youth Advocates and Leaders, hosted a panel discussion with four LGBTQIA youth who have experienced homelessness. The youth cited challenges they experienced, but also talked about how they became entrepreneurs. (GGWash, 12/12)

Unsurprisingly, employment opportunities are frequently among the highest-ranked needs homeless LGBTQ youth report. Panelists said the work they find is often part-time and isn’t sustainable. Chris noted that workplaces can be unwelcoming to LGBTQ people, and that they have experienced prejudice on the job, both intentional and unintentional.

Panelists created small businesses to supplement their income and, in some cases, to feel comfortable being at work. Some of their enterprises include house cleaning, catering, jewelry making, and makeup design.

PHILANTHROPY | Tenneh Kemah, a  WRAG/UMD Philanthropy Fellow with The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation and a student in UMD’s Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management and Leadership program, discusses how her experience with the foundation is helping her gain valuable skills for her work at her own organization. (Daily, 12/13)

IMMIGRATION | This is what sanctuary means for a woman who is undocumented in Virginia. (WaPo, 12/12)

ENVIRONMENT | Big company, big dollars, small community: Dominion deal sparks dissent in community facing gas project (WaPo, 12/9)

WORKFORCE | A D.C. Superior Court judge has ruled that elections officials failed to follow proper procedure when they allowed supporters of the Initiative 77 referendum to collect signatures. (WAMU, 12/12)

PUBLIC SAFETY | Prince George’s County Police Officers of Color File Racial Discrimination Lawsuit (WAMU, 12/12)

TRANSIT | A few weeks ago, the DC Council voted to decriminalize fare evasion, which would stop the targeted arrests of youth of color and Black men. This week, the Northern Virginia Transportation Commission wrote a letter to DC’s mayor expressing its disappointment with the passing of the legislation. (InsideNOVA, 12/12)

HOUSING | Arlington County has released a new report analyzing the progress of its affordable housing master plan. The report found that although it was able to create or preserve 515 homes guaranteed to remain affordable to low-income renters this year, the number is short of the county’s goal. (ARLnow, 12/12)


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