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November 7, 2018 / WRAG

“Our Region, Our Giving 2018” looks at WRAG member philanthropy in the region last year

Overview
In the latest edition of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers’ Our Region, Our Giving report, we take a look at WRAG member giving in the Greater Washington region in 2017. Over the course of this past summer, we collected data from our members on their grantmaking in the region, their “beyond dollars” giving, and other practices. This snapshot of our membership’s philanthropy represents over $217.6 million in giving to nonprofit organizations that serve the region and nearly $3.6 billion in assets.

giving

Impact Investing
In this year’s report, we take a closer look at a particular tool in the philanthropic toolbox: impact investing. Foundations hold incredible wealth, but are only required to pay out five percent of their assets each year. We wanted to find out how our members are putting their endowment dollars – the other 95 percent of their assets – to work in the community. Fifty-nine percent of our survey respondents are currently engaged in impact investing or are actively seeking to become engaged. It’s a relatively new practice among local funders: of those that are currently impact investing, 60 percent of them made their first investment within the last five years.

Racial Equity: A growing priority
In addition, we took a look at what kinds of activities WRAG members are engaged in to advance racial equity in their grantmaking and within their own institutions. In a sign that this is a growing priority within the local philanthropic community, 73 percent of survey respondents reported seeking learning opportunities for their staff and leadership around racial equity – a 143 percent increase over what we found last year. Roughly a third of respondents are taking more substantive steps around changing their grantmaking priorities, collecting demographic data from grantees, and publicly committing to addressing to racial equity.

Other findings of particular note in this year’s report include:

  • 80 percent of respondents provided general operating support in 2017.
  • Education, children, youth and families, and health were the issue areas that most WRAG members supported in 2017.
  • 70 percent of respondents plan to increase the amount of capital to impact investing strategies over the next two years.

Click here to read the full report.

November 5, 2018 / WRAG

Position Announcement: President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

By Yanique Redwood, PhD, MPH
Chair, Board of Directors, WRAG
President and CEO, Consumer Health Foundation

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I am pleased to share the position announcement for the next president of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers. We have partnered with Nonprofit Professionals Advisory Group to launch a national search that will end with a final selection by spring 2019. The next president will succeed current president Tamara Copeland, who announced in July that she will retire after 12 years of brilliant leadership. Ms. Copeland will continue serving in her role until the new president has been named.

Ms. Copeland leaves WRAG in a strong position both financially and programatically. We are seeking a new leader who will build on WRAG’s momentum as a leading voice in the Washington, DC region on issues such as racial equity and continue to galvanize our membership base of independent, family, corporate, and community foundations, CSR offices, donor advised funds, philanthropic advisors, and philanthropic support organizations.

The search committee is being led by Meyer Foundation President Nicky Goren and also includes WRAG board members Amy Owen (Community Foundation for Loudon and Northern Fauquier Counties) and Craig Pascal (BB&T) as well as Doug Duncan (Leadership Greater Washington) and Hanh Le (Weissberg Foundation). Please share the position with strong potential candidates or send nominations to WRAG-pres@nonprofitprofessionals.com.

If you have any questions about the search, please contact: Callie Carroll, ccarroll@nonprofitprofessionals.com or 202-265-0578.

October 31, 2018 / Kendra Allen, Editor

DC has finally closed the DC General shelter

HOMELESSNESS
– The District officially closed the DC General shelter yesterday. Many of the new shelters that were supposed to house the families are not ready, but the city was able to place them in alternative housing. (WAMU, 10/30)

The final closure of the long-troubled shelter, years in the making, was brief and without fanfare. A chain hung loosely across one set of doors and rooms inside the building had been emptied of possessions and cleaned. There was little evidence that the building — which served as a public hospital until it was shuttered in 2001, and as a shelter for a decade — had once housed 270 families at a time, amounting to more than a thousand men, women and children.

“We embarked four years ago on closing D.C. General,” said [DC Mayor] Bowser. “We all believed it was too big, too rundown, too isolated to serve families who need emergency shelter. We have worked over the course of the last four years to create short term family housing in all eight wards of the city.”

– A recent study found unsheltered homeless people face higher mortality rates than sheltered individuals (Street Sense Media, 10/17)

PUBLIC SAFETY | A new report by the DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence found that of the 22 DC agencies that frequently interact with domestic violence survivors, only two have policies on how to respond to reports of domestic violence. (WaPo, 10/31)

NONPROFITS | Susan Nall Bales, founder and board chair of the FrameWorks Institute, advises nonprofits on how to frame their issues better. (NPQ, 10/30)

HEALTHNew Study Suggests People in Arlington’s Poorest Neighborhoods Are Less Able to Lead Healthy Lives (ARLnow, 10/30)

WORKFORCE | A federal labor board has found that a Maryland hospital discouraged nurses from forming a union. (Baltimore Sun, 10/31)

TRANSGENDER RIGHTS | As the federal administration moves to strip transgender people of their rights, the DC Office of Human Rights assures that the city’s local laws our strong. (DCist, 10/30)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Global Children’s Rights Program Officer | Wellspring Philanthropic Fund– New!
Receptionist/Administrative Assistant | Exponent Philanthropy
OST Community Impact Program Manager | United Way of the National Capital Area
Development Coordinator | National Building Museum
Grants Program Manager | Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County
Director of Program Fund Development | National Society of Black Engineers
Special Grants Coordinator/Program Analyst I | Legal Services Corporation
Marketing/Membership Demand Generation Specialist/Digital Marketer | BoardSource
Office Assistant & Member Relations | BoardSource
Grants Manager | DC SCORES
Executive Assistant | Virginia Hospital Medical Brigade
SR. CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP SPECIALIST | PHI, An Exelon Company
Vice President of Programs | Gill Foundation
Program Director for Criminal Justice | Public Welfare Foundation
Senior Program Associate | Exponent Philanthropy
Program Coordinator | Exponent Philanthropy
Director, Corporate Partnerships | Exponent Philanthropy
Program Officer | The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Community Investment Fellow | Greater Washington Community Foundation
Digital Marketing Manager | Greater Washington Community Foundation
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation
Communications Associate, Design and Web | Flamboyan Foundation
Communications Manager, Content and Digital | Flamboyan Foundation
Grants Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter (LAWS)
Chief Development Officer | EveryMind
Director of Development | DC Bar Foundation
Institutional Fundraising Coordinator | Shakespeare Theatre Company

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


The Daily will be back on Monday!

Happy Halloween! Here’s some haunting tales of DC.

– Kendra