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February 20, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

New report links dollar stores to economic distress for people of color

RACE/POVERTY | New research from a nonprofit advocacy group links a lack of grocery stores to the presence of dollar stores in high-poverty neighborhoods with a higher percentage of residents of color. According to the report, there is growing evidence that these dollar stores are causing economic distress for the neighborhoods in which they reside. (WAMU, 2/19)

The Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) reports that dollar stores can be found in Northeast and Southeast DC and in Prince George’s County and are chipping away at the profitability of local grocers and retail outlets and then taking advantage of the void left by the departure of those stores.

“When you look at the maps of the share of residents who are African American, it just jumps right out,” said Stacy Mitchell, co-director of ILSR and the co-author of the report. It looked at the national impact of the discount chains and revealed that as the number of dollar stores increase, shoppers who frequent them continue to struggle financially.

FOOD INSECURITY
– A program at Food & Friends is working to combat food insecurity and negative health outcomes for expectant mothers by providing healthy, hearty meals. (WTOP, 2/20)

– How often fruits and vegetables are depicted on billboards depends on who you are and where you live. (WaPo, 2/19)

ENVIRONMENT | Environmentalists are fighting a solar panel project that would help Georgetown University dramatically reduce its greenhouse gas emissions because the development needed to do it would put tributaries to the Chesapeake Bay at risk. (WaPo, 2/17)

EDUCATION
– The ACLU of Maryland is pushing for passage of a bill that would allow private schools to be sued over alleged discrimination, an option that now exists only for public schools under Maryland law. (WaPo, 2/18)

Study Explores Link Between Health, School Absenteeism (Prince George’s Sentinel, 2/13)

PHILANTHROPY
– Five pioneering black women philanthropists who paved the way for women today.  (PushBlack Now, 2/20)

 – Opinion: Trump’s Emergency Declaration Threatens Philanthropy’s Core Values (Chronicle, 2/18)


Yikes, are we really that bad? Stay off the roads and enjoy the snow today! 

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

February 19, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

DC’s top education leaders trained to merge business concepts with equity in public education

EDUCATION/EQUITY | DC’s top three educational leaders – state superintendent Hanseul Kang, deputy mayor of education Paul Kihn, and acting schools chancellor Lewis Ferebee – have all studied at the Broad Center for the Management of School Systems, an educational leadership program that promotes a business perspective in the management of urban public school districts that has a focus on equity. Those who support the training program say it offers a unique corporate-like training experience, while critics say the teachings encourage school leaders to undermine democratic control of public education. (WAMU, 2/19)

Ferebee says it’s possible to merge these business concepts with equity in public education. “When you are studying leadership and change theory, there is a lot that you can learn from the business sector, and we obviously take advantage of that. [But] it’s not limited to business principles. Maximizing resources is obviously a part of the business community. Often times it is how you impact your bottom line. Maximizing your resources is also one way to address equity, ensuring that you get the most out of the public dollars you have access to.”

CENSUS | Communities of color and immigrants are at particular risk of being undercounted in the 2020 Census and the Virginia Legislature has recently stripped funds for Census outreach. (Commonwealth Institute, 2/14)

RACE | According to a just-released Goucher College poll, a majority of Maryland residents think race relations in the state have worsened in recent years. (WaPo, 2/18)

HEALTH | In honor of Presidents Day, the de Beaumont Foundation has released a quiz with interesting facts about US presidents and how their policy, advocacy, and private lives have influenced Americans’ health.

HOMELESSNESS | A challenge to Virginia’s ‘habitual drunkard’ law argues that it targets homeless people. (WaPo, 2/18)

WORKFORCE | A proposed bill currently being considered in Annapolis would phase out lower wages paid to tipped workers. (WAMU, 2/8)

ENVIRONMENT | If we don’t address climate change, DC weather will feel more like Mississippi in the next 60 years. (WAMU, 2/15)

NONPROFITS | Sometimes the best thing we donors can do to advance social justice is to just write the check and get out of the way (Nonprofit AF, 2/18)


Marylanders love our Old Bay – do you know what’s in it?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

February 15, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

How bikeshare can address, rather than perpetuate, DC’s disparities

EQUITY | In 2010, the DC Department of Transportation introduced the first city-operated bikesharing system in North America, and Capital Bikeshare users have since generated millions of rides, although use and station placement varies around the city. Equity is a focus in the bikeshare development plan, and the Urban Institute is looking at Capital Bikeshare’s potential to address the DC’s racial and economic disparities. (Urban Institute, 2/11)

We placed the 2017 data in the context of DC’s socioeconomic characteristics to identify challenges and opportunities for developing bikeshare equitably. Our analysis revealed two primary challenges. 1. Station placement isn’t equitable and follows patterns of existing infrastructure, and 2. Station use differs by neighborhood.

How can the city use bikeshare service to support its equity goals? … Drawing from best practices and studies on potential barriers for accessing bikeshares, here are some ideas policymakers should consider: 1. Promote transparent decisionmaking and access to data, 2. Develop infrastructure equitably, and 3. Ease barriers to access for disadvantaged communities.

WORKFORCE | The Walker’s Legacy Foundation, a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG, has launched a new business program for low-income single mothers to help develop financial and entrepreneurship skills. (WBJ, 2/14)

FOOD SECURITY | Farmers in the Greater DC region are dwindling because of local development. According to a recent report by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments the decline is threatening food security and reducing the region’s ability to rely on itself for food production. (WAMU, 2/14)

EQUALITY | Inside the Virginia Capitol, a legislative duel over the ERA (WaPo, 2/14)

GUN VIOLENCE | Students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in partnership with The Trace – a nonprofit news site specifically focused on gun violence – have published Since Parkland, which involved 200 high school aged reporters who wrote 100-word pieces on each of the 1,200 children who died as a result of gun violence in the US last year. (NPQ, 2/13)

TRANSIT | With Major Funding Source At Stake, Metro Committee Votes To Keep Current Hours (WAMU, 2/14)

ENVIRONMENT | Many Americans are committed to recycling, but how much of what is put in recycling bins is actually being recycled? (WAMU, 2/12)

RACE
– A local Black Lives Matter activist is suing the DC police believing she is being surveilled, which echoes others around the country who have made similar claims. (WAMU, 2/11)

– Area Colleges Address Racist Imagery In Their Own Yearbooks (DCist, 2/12)

PHILANTHROPY
Opinion: Philanthropy’s focus on peace isn’t enough without attention to climate change as well. (Chronicle, 2/14 – Subscription)

Opinion: How Grant Makers Can Tune In to What Nonprofits Need Most (Chronicle, 2/12 – Subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Management Specialist | DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities – New!
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Grant Writer | Framingham State University
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Controller | Meyer Foundation
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
CSR Internship | Gannett Inc., USAToday /Gannett Foundation
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
President | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A book checked out in 1946, that was almost 27,000 days past its due date, has just been returned to the Silver Spring Library – and luckily, there is no fine!

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

– Buffy

February 13, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

New housing unit for adults with disabilities underway in Rockville

DISABILITY RIGHTS| As the number of children with developmental disabilities increases and housing becomes limited after age 21, projects focused on adults with disabilities are growing across the country. (WaPo, 2/12)

Waiting lists for group homes are long, and the homes are not a good fit for everyone. Living alone with a caregiver can be isolating and potentially dangerous. Meanwhile, the need for housing solutions is growing. The CDC said in 2018 that approximately 1 in 59 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, and in the next 10 years an estimated 500,000 people with autism will enter adulthood, with almost 424,000 on waiting lists for residential services, according to Kim Musheno, vice president of public policy for the Autism Society of America.

EDUCATION
– Debate Over Charter School Transparency Rooted In DC’s Struggle For Local Governance (WAMU, 2/12)

– Acting schools chancellor Lewis Ferebee testified this week before the DC Council and got a glimpse into the politics that may await him if he is confirmed as chancellor of the DC public school system. (WaPo, 2/12)

RACE
– Blackface is just a symptom of American medicine’s racist past (WaPo, 2/12)

– Wilson High School in DC is considering changing the name, based on the former President’s policies and prejudices. (WAMU, 2/13)

HEALTH | Virginia moves closer to raising the legal smoking age from 18 to 21. (WaPo, 2/12)

TRANSIT/EQUITY
– Under a new plan being proposed by Metro, the agency would subsidize an Uber, Lyft or other on-demand trip to fill the late-night service gap for workers. (WaPo, 2/13)

– Transit Equity Day was celebrated across the country this year on February 4 in honor of Rosa Parks, and is focusing on transit as a civil rights issue and a component of a climate-safe future. (NPQ, 2/4)

LGBTQIA+  | Having experienced harassment in the past, a homophobic pamphlet was recently found in The Washington Blade newspaper, the city’s free LGBTQIA+ newspaper. (DCist, 2/12)

NONPROFITS | Nonprofit Workforce Study Finds Strengths in Growth, Pay, and Resilience (NPQ, 2/7)

PHILANTHROPY | How Foundations Can Help Opportunity Zone Communities Succeed (SSIR, 2/7)


Wait, we just had snow in Hawaii??

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

February 12, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

Legislators move to honor the memories of Montgomery County’s lynching victims

RACE/EQUITY
– Legislators in Montgomery County have moved to acknowledge Maryland’s history of lynchings by introducing a Remembrance and Reconciliation Commission bill to honor the memories of the county’s three known lynching victims. (WAMU, 2/11)

The text of the Montgomery County resolution asks for the commission to work with the Equal Justice Initiative, which last year opened a memorial honoring the 4,000 African-American victims of lynchings. The commission would place historical markers at the locations of the county’s three known lynchings, collect soil at each of the locations and create a monument dedicated to the victims. The group would also “design programs to advance the dialogue that the monument, historical markers and soil should foster.”

Related: Understanding our country’s racial history is a critical step toward advancing racial equity. For this reason, WRAG and Leadership Greater Washington partnered to take funders and other civic leaders on a Civil Rights Learning Journey throughout the South last year. The trip is happening again this Spring. Interested WRAG and LGW members can learn more here, and register to attend an info session on Thursday here.

– Bike equity is a powerful tool for increasing access to transportation and reducing inequality in US cities. However, cycling infrastructure is often times designed for and tailored to wealthy white cyclists. (CityLab, 2/8)

ENTREPRENEURSHIP | JPMorgan Chase, the A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation, and Capital Impact Partners have launched a $6.65 million loan fund to assist minority entrepreneurs. (WBJ, 2/11)

NONPROFITS | Since climate change will affect nonprofits across the board, should they consider putting climate in every mission statement? (NPQ, 2/11)

PHILANTHROPY
– The current surge in the growth of giving circles is being driven by millennials and women. (WSJ, 2/10)

Opinion: All Donors Need More Education — Not Just the Wealthy (Chronicle, 2/12 – Subscription)

RFP |  The 2019 Community Investment Funds Grant Cycle is accepting applications, due by this Thursday, February 14 by 5:00 pm. This is the largest discretionary grant cycle managed by the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia.


Did you watch the Grammy’s on Sunday? Like music? Check out some of the great concerts taking place in DC this week.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow and Friday!

– Buffy

February 8, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

Would making DC public transit free have multiple benefits?

TRANSIT | Opinion: Evidence of discrimination in enforcement catalyzed the DC Council recently to decriminalize transit fare evasion. But, should DC take it a step further and consider making public transportation free? Advocates say such a measure would boost usage, alleviate fare enforcement discrimination, and be another step toward Universal Basic Mobility. (CityLab, 2/6)

Civil rights tensions over fare collection alone probably aren’t enough to spur a costless public transportation movement, but they could be a catalyst. Removing fares could [also] trigger ridership gains … creating a virtuous cycle where better service attracts more riders. Ending transit fare collection could bring other benefits as well … [including] removing a major impediment to universal basic mobility (UBM), which grants every citizen a right to travel to a job, school, or wherever else they need to go. Given the concentration of low-income residents on public transportation, providing costless rides would be a major step toward UBM.

RACIAL EQUITY
– The Consumer Health Foundation has reintroduced the WeARE initiative, designed to change the popular narrative that undergirds racial inequities in the Greater DC region. (Video)

Opinion: Take down the Confederate statues now (WaPo, 2/7)

EDUCATION
– The Montgomery County Council president Nancy Navarro has asked school officials to rename a Silver Spring Middle School comprised primarily of students of color. The school is currently named after Colonel E. Brooke Lee, a man known to have a disturbing racist history. (WaPo, 2/7)

DC residents call for a new chancellor to build trust and stability in schools (WaPo, 2/6)

ENVIRONMENT | Despite Few Details And Much Doubt, The Green New Deal Generates Enthusiasm (NPR, 2/8)

SHUTDOWN | Rocky restart after government shutdown: Many workers still haven’t received back pay (WaPo, 2/7)

ART/RACE | An exhibit at the Maria & Alberto de la Cruz Art Gallery at Georgetown University, “To be a Negro in this country is really never to be looked at,” which takes its title from a James Baldwin essay, explores the timely question of who the National Mall is for. (CP, 2/7)

PHILANTHROPYShutdown, Philanthropy, and the Frail Economics of Working Families (NPQ, 2/5)


Social Sector Job Openings 

USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace – New!
Grant Writer | Framingham State University – New!
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund – New!
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward – New!
Controller | Meyer Foundation
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
CSR Internship | Gannett Inc., USAToday /Gannett Foundation
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


“We lost two great Americans today – Frank Robinson and John Dingell – citizens who inspired me and so many others by leading on the civil rights issues of our time, opening doors to others, and leaving it all on the field.” – President Obama

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

– Buffy

February 7, 2019 / Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, Editor

Those experiencing homelessness more vulnerable to violent crime

HOMELESSNESS | In a new report, the National Coalition for the Homeless documents that those experiencing homelessness are more likely to be victims of violent crime than the general population, arguing that the dehumanization they experience leads to their marginalization and leaves them unprotected. (GG Washington, 2/5)

In their latest report, “Vulnerable to Hate: A Survey of Bias-Motivated Violence against People Experiencing Homelessness in 2016-2017,” the NCH documented at least 112 anti-homeless attacks that occurred in the United States in 2016 and 2017 and analyzed 1,769 reported acts of violence committed against people experiencing homeless from 1999-2017. Of the 1,769 violent acts, 476 victims lost their lives as a result.

RACIAL EQUITY
– In her latest blog post, WRAG’s managing director of corporate strategy, Katy Moore, reflects on the significance of the racist photo from Governor Northam’s yearbook page, and the relationship between racist imagery and the deep racial inequities that underlie our social systems. (Daily, 2/7)

– During Black History Month, DC educators embrace Black Lives Matter week, and tackle a challenging and sensitive topic: how to talk about race with young students. (DC Line, 2/4)

PHILANTHROPY |  “Why we give – The need to connect and belong,”  – TedX Talk by Community Foundation for Northern Virginia‘s President and CEO, Eileen Ellsworth.

IMMIGRATION | DC Mayor Bowser has awarded the National Immigration Forum a $100,000 grant to support city employees and residents who are trying to become U.S. citizens. (WaPo, 2/4)

LGBTQIA/EQUITY | Gender-neutral bathrooms benefit a lot of people. Our region needs more of them. (GG Washington, 2/6)

HOUSING | A bill was introduced this week to revoke the DC Housing Authority’s status as an independent agency and fold it into the purview of the Office of the Mayor. (City Paper, 2/5)

HEALTH | A smoking ban currently in place in Rockville and Gaithersburg could soon cover all of Montgomery County. (WTOP, 2/6)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
– The U.S. Attorney for DC has announced a strategy to prosecute some gun-related crimes in federal court, rather than DC Superior Court. According to the ACLU, this would contribute to mass incarceration. (WaPo, 2/6)

– DC officials are putting an additional $6 million toward violence prevention and jobs training programs in light of the recent increase in violence across the city. (DC Line, 2/2)

COMMUNITY | BB&T and SunTrust are set to combine in a $66B deal that will result in the third largest bank in the DC area by market share (WBJ, 2/7)

SHUTDOWN | DC Is Preparing For The Possibility Of Another Shutdown (WAMU, 2/5)

VIRGINIA | Northern Virginia lawmakers are welcoming Amazon to the region. (DCist, 2/5)


The Oscars won’t have a host this year – the first time since 1989 when Rob Lowe danced with Snow White in an opening number that is now considered the most cringe-worthy moment in awards-show history.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow!

– Buffy