Child care costs are on the rise, while many providers are struggling to make ends meet

CHILD CARE | As child care costs continue to rise, many providers are still among the lowest-paid workers in the country, while area parents are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation. (WAMU, 5/29)

In DC, the median hourly wage for childcare workers was $14.33 in 2017. In Maryland, it was $11.29. And in Virginia, it was $9.82 … This may come as a surprise to area parents, who are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation — sometimes thousands of dollars a month. [According to] Lea Austin, co-director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, those costs may not be high enough to provide what’s needed. Austin says that after paying for the essentials of running a child care center — things like rent, utilities and supplies — there’s little money left for the actual people who are doing the work, many of whom are women, often women of color.

CENSUS | In today’s Daily WRAG, the co-chairs of WRAG’s Census 2020 Working Group, Levina Kim (United Way of the National Capital Area), Ria Pugeda (Consumer Health Foundation), and Terri Wright (Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation), explain the urgency around the 2020 Census and call on their philanthropic colleagues to invest to support outreach, education, and assistance for those communities most at risk of being undercounted in the census. (Daily, 5/30)

HOUSING | How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For blue-collar and service workers in major cities – like Washington, DC – the affordable housing crisis hits harder. (CityLab, 5/21)

EDUCATION
– Arlington Public Schools has reached a settlement with the US Department of Justice to improve services for English-learning students over the next three years, after the Justice Department found multiple compliance issues with the English Learner programs and practices.  (WAMU, 5/21)

– Governor Hogan has vetoed a bill that would have allowed more undocumented immigrants to pay in-state college tuition. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/24)

IMMIGRATION | As part of the county’s newly approved $5.8 billion operating budget, the Montgomery County Council has allocated $14.5 million for 335 individual grants to community nonprofits, the largest share of which is going toward immigration assistance programs. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/29)

CULTURE | DC’s independent, black-owned bookstores are thriving. But will high taxes do them in? (GGWash, 5/29)

ENVIRONMENT | The Tidal Basin Is One Of America’s ‘Most Endangered Places’ (WAMU, 5/30)

TRANSITDo more roads mean less traffic? That’s the question Maryland and Virginia are being asked as the Capital Beltway widening proposal is discussed. (WAMU, 5/29)

ECONOMY | National parks tourism brought over $1.5B in benefits to DC area (WTOP, 5/28)

PHILANTHROPY | The Butterfly Effect: Tracking the Growth of Women’s Funds (Philanthropy Women, 5/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation – New!
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC – New!
Foundation Director | Venable LLP – New!
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Sparkling wine from a DC food truck? Yes, please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday!

– Buffy

Study finds over 20,000 Black DC residents displaced between 2000 and 2013

HOUSING/RACIAL EQUITY
– According to a just-released study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, approximately 40 percent of the District’s lower-income neighborhoods experienced gentrification between 2000 and 2013. The city also saw the most African American residents displaced from their neighborhoods during that time, giving DC the greatest “intensity of gentrification” of any city in the country. (WaPo, 3/19)

More than 20,000 residents were displaced from their neighborhoods by mostly affluent, white newcomers, which is part of the intensity ranking, where “you feel it and you see it,” said Jesse Van Tol, chief executive of the NCRC, a research and advocacy coalition of 600 community organizations that promote economic and racial justice. “It’s the visibility and the pace of it.”

– DC families living in public housing face ongoing health issues. (CP, 3/20)

HOMELESSNESS | Victims of domestic violence are particularly vulnerable to homelessness. (WaPo, 3/30)

VIRGINIA | Opinion: Don’t underestimate Amazon HQ2’s importance (WBJ, 3/21)

CHILD CARE | Mayor Bowser has proposed building three new early education centers for kids aged four, which could create more than 500 new openings. (WAMU, 3/21)

GENDER/EQUITY | The National Museum of Women in the Arts will host its annual Art+Feminism edit-a-thon to improve Wikipedia entries about notable women artists to help improve the site’s gender imbalance. (WAMU, 3/22)

EDUCATION | This school in the District had a high pregnancy rate, so it opened a day care for students, which helped to decrease pregnancies and increase its graduation rate. (EdSurge, 3/15)

COMMUNITY | The Greater Washington Good Business Awards ​ is accepting applications through Friday, April 5.

PHILANTHROPY/RACE | The recently released study, Women Give 2019: Gender and Giving Across Communities of Color, found that race has little impact on giving. (Chronicle, 3/19 – Subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Program Specialist | Jack and Jill Foundation – New!
Program Manager | Weissberg Foundation – New!
Director of Development Partnerships – New England | League of Conservation Voters – New!
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Grants Management Associate | Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


How is your March Madness bracket looking this morning? Catch all the fun today online!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday next week!

– Buffy

Virginia racial gerrymandering case headed to the Supreme Court

RACIAL JUSTICE | Today the US Supreme Court will hear arguments in Virginia’s racial gerrymandering redistricting case, which could determine the balance of power in the state’s legislature for years. (WaPo, 3/17)

A panel of lower-court judges ruled last year that 11 Virginia House of Delegates districts were racially gerrymandered and ordered a new map to correct them. House Republicans appealed that finding and will argue against the new map before the high court. All 140 seats in the legislature are on the ballot this fall. The party that controls the General Assembly in 2021 will oversee the next statewide re­districting effort, following next year’s census — potentially cementing an advantage in future elections.

– Virginia is confronting its dark past and seeking to document as many lynching cases as possible, including three in Loudoun County that are expected to be memorialized by a historical marker in the future. (Loudoun County Times, 3/16)

HOMELESSNESS
DC Central Kitchen, which serves 10,000 meals per day to homeless shelters, is facing financial turbulence after losing a major portion of a long-standing contract. (CP, 3/14)

– The District’s new Downtown Services Center in the basement of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church is a new space that provides many services for people experiencing homelessness, from access to healthcare to a barber shop. (WTOP, 3/14)

EDUCATION | DC’s Free Preschool Program Turns 10. How It’s Changed Family Life In The District (WAMU, 3/15)

CHILD CARE | Arlington votes to adopt changes to improve child care access. (arlingtonva.us, 3/16)

MENTAL HEALTH | Mental health problems rise significantly among young Americans (WaPo, 3/16)

DISABILITY RIGHTS | Why The College Admissions Scandal Hurts Students With Disabilities (NPR, 3/14)

ENVIRONMENT | How a 7th-grader’s strike against climate change exploded into a movement (WaPo, 23/16)


Did you know this about St. Patrick’s Day? Sláinte!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

New report encourages local leaders to make housing in the Greater Washington region more affordable

HOUSING | The Greater Washington region is home to some of the areas most expensive real estate, and with Amazon headed to Northern Virginia and housing prices rising, advocates are encouraging local leaders to commit to creating and preserving affordable housing. (WAMU, 1/30)

“The announcement by Amazon that Crystal City was selected for HQ2 will provide significant benefits for the region,” says a recent report from the Northern Virginia Affordable Housing Alliance. “However, this announcement should create a regional sense of urgency and commitment to address our housing supply and affordability gap.” The affordability gap exists throughout the Washington area — not just in Northern Virginia — but Arlington’s housing market is already the priciest in the region, according to multiple analyses. To solve the problem, advocates say increasing public subsidies is important, but not the only solution.

RELATED: Many of the solutions mentioned in NVAHA’s new report were highlighted in the Housing Leaders Group’s A Guidebook for Increasing Housing Affordability in the Greater Washington Region. WRAG, as one of the co-conveners of the HLG, is working with NVAHA and other active HLG members to address the housing affordability crisis that is threatening the region’s economic growth and quality of life.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE | Opinion: How the justice system criminalizes the poor — and funds itself in the process (WaPo, 1/29)

EDUCATION
– DC charter schools are closing and putting children in education limbo. (WaPo, 1/31)

Koch network poised to scale up efforts to remake K-12 education with a pilot project in five states (WaPo, 1/29)

CHILD CARE | Arlington’s Child Care Initiative has the potential to make a dent in the rising costs of child care in the community. (GGW, 1/29)

ENVIRONMENT | Coal ash piles in the Chesapeake Bay watershed will be cleaned up thanks to a new agreement between Governor Ralph Northam of Virginia, lawmakers, and Dominion Energy. (WAMU, 1/25)

NONPROFITS | Nonprofit boards generally know that diversity is important, but very few of them do anything to actively encourage it. (Fast Company, 1/29)

TRANSPORTATION | Purple Line contractor says it will cost nearly $60 million to offset delays of the 21 station light-rail project between Prince George’s and Montgomery counties. (WaPo, 1/30)

DIGITAL DIVIDE | DC is one of a small handful of cities addressing the digital divide by offering publicly funded tech support programs. (CityLab, 1/25)

PHILANTHROPY
– The Wayfinder Foundation has announced its second fellowship cohort of women activist leaders in Oakland, CA and Washington DC.

– Nonprofits and Donors Worry About Long-Term Impact of Shutdown (Chronicle, 1/25 – subscription)

RFP: The Gannett Foundation has created “A Community Thrives,” part of the USA TODAY NETWORK, as a way to share community building ideas on the national stage, gain support through donations and local connections, and have a chance at receiving a portion of $2,000,000 in grants to give your project and organization the best possible chance to succeed. Submissions for the 2019 A Community Thrives program are open from January 29, 2019 through February 28, 2019 at 11:59 pm ET. Learn more and submit your idea here.


Social Sector Job Openings 

Controller | Meyer Foundation – New!
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health – New!
CSR Internship | Gannett Inc., USAToday /Gannett Foundation – New!
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County – New!
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Program Manager​ | ​Weissberg Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Grant Reviewer​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Administrative Associate | United Philanthropy Forum
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
President | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Today is the start of Black History Month, which is celebrated throughout the DC region.

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

– Buffy

The most expensive metro in the U.S. to raise a family

DISTRICT
D.C. was recently ranked as the most expensive metro area in the U.S. to raise a family. Data show that a family of four would need to make $106,493 a year in order to cover the costs of their necessities in the city. (DCist, 1/11)

The study looked at 618 metro areas, [in] 500 of which [parents] cited childcare as the single most expensive cost annually. D.C. ranked first as the most expensive metro area to raise a family.

In our fair city, parents with two kids must shell out $31,158 a year for childcare, while the national average for childcare costs for a family of four is about $12,500 a year. A single-parent mother who earns the median income for her demographic could spend nearly her entire yearly salary on childcare here.

– Later this month, the D.C. Zoning Commission will take a closer look at inclusionary zoning in an effort to potentially bring more affordable housing to residents in need. (GGW, 1/11)

– D.C.’s Population and Wealth are Growing (BisNow, 1/11)

HOMELESSNESS
– Montgomery County announced that they had succeeded at effectively ending veteran homelessness there at the end of 2015. A panel discusses how the goal was achieved and how other counties can implement similar efforts. (The Kojo Nnamdi Show, 1/7) – Audio

– Opinion: Despite recent strides in the gay rights movement, one writer urges the public to place more attention on youth LGBT homelessness. Forty percent of homeless youth served by agencies identify as LGBT, according to data. (HuffPo, 1/11)

PHILANTHROPY | The National Center for Family Philanthropy presents six family philanthropy trends to look out for in 2016. (NCFP, 1/7)


How many different ways can you slice a pizza

– Ciara

WRAG Board elects 2016 board officers

WRAG
WRAG is excited to announce that this week the WRAG Board elected the following members to serve as new and returning board officers beginning in 2016:

ChairLynn Tadlock, Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Vice ChairYanique Redwood, Consumer Health Foundation
TreasurerAnna Bard, Wells Fargo
Secretary – Mary McClymont, Public Welfare Foundation

CHILDREN/REGION
– DC Action for Children has released a new analysis based on 20 indicators of well-being to determine the state of children in the District’s eight wards. In some wards, children and their families are being left behind in an ever-growing city (WCP, 12/8):

Wards 5, 7, and 8 contain some of the largest numbers of children yet have the lowest median family incomes, even as the median income in D.C. increased by roughly 18 percent between 2010 and 2013. At least one in five children in Wards 1, 5, 6, 7, and 8 live in poverty, the analysis reports; the total child poverty rate in D.C. dropped by less than one percent during the same period.

– Another study sheds light on the high costs of child care for parents in the U.S. – and especially D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. As child care costs rival that of sending a young adult to college, the report by Child Care Aware urges Congress to take action. (WTOP, 12/8)

HOUSING | Why it’s so hard to afford a rental even if you make a decent salary (WaPo, 12/9)

ECONOMY/REGION | A recent gathering of three elected leaders from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia show that top leaders are starting to think more regionally. (WaPo, 12/8)

PHILANTHROPY 
Opinion: Author, chief executive of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and previous WRAG Annual Meeting speaker Emmett Carson, shares in this open letter why he believes the Council on Foundations and Independent Sector should merge to build a stronger, more integrated network for the social profit sector. (Chronicle, 12/4)

Opinion: 3 Key Ideas on the Power of the Zuckerberg-Chan Pledge (Chronicle, 12/8)

HEALTH/HOMELESSNESS | The Atlantic explores the dynamic of a family in shelter with four young children as the parents participate in a program that aims to strengthen the bonds among homeless families that are often strained due to overwhelming stress. (Atlantic, 12/8)


Here are a few of the books Bill Gates says you should be reading right now.

– Ciara

 

Affording child care on a minimum wage

WORKFORCE/DISTRICT
A new report from the Economic Policy Institute examines child-care costs for minimum-wage earners in each state. For many, the costs associated with full-time infant care are beyond burdensome. (WaPo, 10/6)

Such workers in New York and Massachusetts would have to fork over more than 80 percent of their annual earnings, according to the findings, published Tuesday. In Washington, D.C., they’d need to throw in everything — plus extra: 102 percent of a minimum-wage salary is required to cover the average annual cost of infant care.

This reality leaves few options for families with sparse financial resources and inflexible work schedules, said Elise Gould, senior economist at EPI, who co-wrote the study. Even if a parent qualifies for child-care subsidies, waiting lists in some states can stretch long enough for her to lose a job or leave a child in a risky arrangement.

– Under a new measure introduced today, and supported by a majority of the D.C. Council, the District would have “the most generous” family leave plan in the U.S. (WaPo, 10/6)

PHILANTHROPY | As mass shootings continue to rattle the nation, WRAG president Tamara Copeland asks whether philanthropy will take the lead on tackling what has become an urgent public health problem in America, as it has done successfully in the past. (Daily, 10/6)

POVERTY/VIRGINIAIn this series, WAMU takes a look at the ways Virginia’s car-title loan industry has lured and trapped many low-income individuals in the region into a continuous cycle of debt. (WAMU, 10/5)

YOUTH | Following an op-ed in which a columnist challenged D.C. officials to place more emphasis on preventing juvenile crime in the city, Washington City Paper takes a look at a recent analysis that actually finds youth arrests at their lowest level in a decade last year. (WCP, 10/5)


Prepare for your next museum visit by learning to correctly pronounce the names of these artists.

– Ciara