Amazon investing in education and affordable housing in Northern Virginia

HOUSING | Amazon will donate $3 million to the Arlington Community Foundation to support affordable housing in Arlington County and, in a separate venture, will help George Mason University and Northern Virginia Community College create a new, high-tech bachelor’s degree to help meet its future workforce needs, the company announced Tuesday. (WaPo, 6/11)

Since Amazon announced in November that it was building a second headquarters in Crystal City, critics and supporters alike have urged it to do more to support affordable housing… Amazon’s $3 million donation will create a fund that can be used to subsidize some costs of new affordable housing and pay for services for homeless people or those who cannot afford their rent.

COMMUNITY | In the final installment of WRAG’s Journalism Fellows Project, we hear from Jailen Fuller, a junior at Fairmont Heights High School in Prince George’s County, who hopes to use her voice to help those who feel like they do not have one. (Daily, 6/12)

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County Public Schools will receive an additional $53 million from the state’s Kirwan Commission for next school year. (WAMU, 6/11)

ENVIRONMENT | Maryland joins DC in passing “clean” energy legislation. But is burning trash clean? (GGWash, 6/11)

DISTRICT | Part of the old RFK Stadium parking lot is now a park with soccer fields and more. (WAMU, 6/8)

DISABILITY RIGHTS | St. Elizabeths, the only public psychiatric hospital in the District, has a long history of misusing the controversial practice of seclusion, which is known to cause lasting psychiatric harm. According to disability rights lawyers from University Legal Services, the hospital has increasingly, and potentially illegally, used such practices. (CP, 6/11)

YOUTH | The Junior Tennis Champions Center in College Park teaches how to win on the court and in the classroom. (WaPo, 6/8)

NONPROFITS | The role of a healthy capital investment in helping an organization to optimize its impact. (NPQ, 6/11)

PHILANTHROPY | Why Foundations Should Connect Policy Groups to the People They Seek to Help(Chronicle, 6/11)


How to celebrate Pride in the District all month long.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

Child care costs are on the rise, while many providers are struggling to make ends meet

CHILD CARE | As child care costs continue to rise, many providers are still among the lowest-paid workers in the country, while area parents are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation. (WAMU, 5/29)

In DC, the median hourly wage for childcare workers was $14.33 in 2017. In Maryland, it was $11.29. And in Virginia, it was $9.82 … This may come as a surprise to area parents, who are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation — sometimes thousands of dollars a month. [According to] Lea Austin, co-director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, those costs may not be high enough to provide what’s needed. Austin says that after paying for the essentials of running a child care center — things like rent, utilities and supplies — there’s little money left for the actual people who are doing the work, many of whom are women, often women of color.

CENSUS | In today’s Daily WRAG, the co-chairs of WRAG’s Census 2020 Working Group, Levina Kim (United Way of the National Capital Area), Ria Pugeda (Consumer Health Foundation), and Terri Wright (Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation), explain the urgency around the 2020 Census and call on their philanthropic colleagues to invest to support outreach, education, and assistance for those communities most at risk of being undercounted in the census. (Daily, 5/30)

HOUSING | How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For blue-collar and service workers in major cities – like Washington, DC – the affordable housing crisis hits harder. (CityLab, 5/21)

EDUCATION
– Arlington Public Schools has reached a settlement with the US Department of Justice to improve services for English-learning students over the next three years, after the Justice Department found multiple compliance issues with the English Learner programs and practices.  (WAMU, 5/21)

– Governor Hogan has vetoed a bill that would have allowed more undocumented immigrants to pay in-state college tuition. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/24)

IMMIGRATION | As part of the county’s newly approved $5.8 billion operating budget, the Montgomery County Council has allocated $14.5 million for 335 individual grants to community nonprofits, the largest share of which is going toward immigration assistance programs. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/29)

CULTURE | DC’s independent, black-owned bookstores are thriving. But will high taxes do them in? (GGWash, 5/29)

ENVIRONMENT | The Tidal Basin Is One Of America’s ‘Most Endangered Places’ (WAMU, 5/30)

TRANSITDo more roads mean less traffic? That’s the question Maryland and Virginia are being asked as the Capital Beltway widening proposal is discussed. (WAMU, 5/29)

ECONOMY | National parks tourism brought over $1.5B in benefits to DC area (WTOP, 5/28)

PHILANTHROPY | The Butterfly Effect: Tracking the Growth of Women’s Funds (Philanthropy Women, 5/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation – New!
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC – New!
Foundation Director | Venable LLP – New!
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Sparkling wine from a DC food truck? Yes, please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday!

– Buffy

Will Lonnie Bunch and the Smithsonian change the conversation and culture surrounding white supremacy?

CULTURE | The significance of Lonnie Bunch’s appointment as the 14th secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, goes far beyond the fact that he is the first African American to hold the job. He is in a unique position to grapple with the institution’s history, which is bound up in complicated ways with the history of white supremacy. (WaPo, 5/28)

Bunch can talk comfortably, in public, about white supremacy which could change not only the Smithsonian, but also the culture of the country it represents. Bunch takes over at a moment of extreme peril in human history, and will lead perhaps the only institution in American life that has both the intellectual capacity and the public credibility to confront the three greatest dangers we now face: climate change, the cultural and technological corruption of democratic processes, and white supremacy and neo-nationalism, three things that will be increasingly interconnected … the fact that Bunch can utter the words “white supremacy” is occasion for hope … if you can anatomize it and explain it to Americans, you can probably solve a host of other problems, too. Bunch has long since demonstrated he can do exactly that.

PHILANTHROPY/NONPROFITS | Yesterday, The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation announced an innovative partnership with Catchafire to bring capacity building support to more than 100 nonprofits in the D.C. metropolitan area. Through this partnership, select Cafritz grantees will have access to virtual, skills-based volunteers, to help them strengthen their infrastructure, build their capacity, and allow staff to focus on achieving their organization’s programmatic goals. Read the press release here.

WORKFORCE | The DC Central Kitchen’s latest culinary arts program for 18-24 year-olds aims to help connect them to job opportunities in DC’s booming restaurant industry. The program is run out the THEARC in Ward 8. (WaPo, 5/27)

DISTRICT
– On Tuesday the DC Council added millions to subsidize the District’s only public hospital and to repair deteriorated public housing stock, with the passage of a $15.5 billion budget for the next fiscal year, but made cuts in other areas, including a workforce housing fund and free fares on Circulator buses. (WaPo, 5/28)

After a heated fight about race and schools, DC Council decides: Banneker will move to Shaw (WaPo, 5/28)

Need For Urgent Public Housing Repairs Prompts DC Council To Tap Controversial Source Of Money (WAMU, 5/28)

HOUSING | Getting a home near Amazon’s HQ2 in Crystal City is already a lot harder than it was before the announcement that they were coming to town. (WBJ, 5/27)

PUBLIC SAFETY | ‘This Will Not Be the New Normal’: DC Police Prepare For Possible Spike In Violence (WAMU, 5/28)

TRANSIT | As Metro shutdown arrives, dread pervades the Yellow and Blue lines (WaPo, 5/27)

NONPROFITS/RACIAL EQUITY | The Building Movement Project has just released Nonprofit Executives and the Racial Leadership Gap: A Race to Lead Brief which explores the gaps between executive leaders of color and white leaders and compares nonprofit executives to respondents in staff positions.


How to get to the beach this summer without a car.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

A disproportionate number of black people are arrested in the District for minor violations

JUSTICE/RACIAL EQUITY | A study from two watchdog groups has found that a disproportionate number of black people are arrested in the District for minor violations, including driving without a license, gambling, and smoking marijuana in public. The disparities are spread across the District and not limited to wards with high crime rates. (WaPo, 5/14)

The study was done by the DC office of the American Civil Liberties Union and a consortium of groups advocating transparency called Open the Government and is based on five years of arrest statistics … and says blacks accounted for 86 percent of the total arrests over the years examined, even though they make up slightly less than half of the District’s population … The disparity held true across 90 percent of the District’s census tracts “including the whitest parts of the city.”

HEALTHCARE | Kaiser Permanente is rolling out Thrive Local, a digital care coordination platform that makes it easier for its medical providers to connect patients to community-based social services. (NPQ, 5/8)

HOUSING
– Mayor Bowser calls for equitably distributing affordable housing and for creating enough overall housing. (GGWash, 5/13)

– ‘Build More Housing’ Is No Match for Inequality (CityLab, 5/9)

GENTRIFICATION
– The District’s Ivy City neighborhood is rapidly gentrifying and trying to preserve a sense of community. (WaPo, 5/4)

– After #DontMuteDC, this year’s Funk Parade is a call to action (WaPo, 5/11)

COMMUNITY | Alice M. Rivlin, a master of budgetary and fiscal policy who, among many roles, was an advocate for healthy communities, passed away yesterday at age 88. (WaPo, 5/14)

PUBLIC SAFETY | Lead in the District’s water is still a problem. Will the DC Council fund a plan to fix it? (GGWash, 5/13)

MARYLAND/VIRGINIA | According to an annual “Best States” survey, Maryland and Virginia are among the nation’s best states based on metrics including education, health care, the economy and public safety. (US News & World Report, 5/14)

PHILANTHROPY | Dozens of giving circles in the US recently met in Seattle to share stories, hopes and plans for building a stronger giving circle movement. (Philanthropy Women, 5/2)


Meet the “Bee Lady” of Capitol Hill

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Is the solution to the District’s housing crisis to invest in the middle class?

HOUSING | A strategy to produce and preserve workforce housing is gaining support among elected officials and developers to address the affordable housing shortage in the District. (WAMU, 5/2)

In her proposed 2020 budget, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has called for the creation of an unprecedented $20 million “workforce housing” fund that would subsidize homes affordable to middle-income professionals like teachers, social workers, and first responders… Many developers applaud the mayor’s workforce fund, saying it will help incentivize builders to construct and preserve housing that isn’t market-rate or “luxury.” Businesses tend to like it, too, because they want to be where the workforce lives. But the applause is countered by critics who say the mayor should instead invest that $20 million in low-income housing — particularly public housing, an estimated third of which is currently uninhabitable due to hazardous conditions.

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County may become the first jurisdiction in the country to use a public-private partnership to build and maintain several of its public schools, to speed up construction and decrease debt. (WaPo, 5/5)

LGBTQIA+ | Transgender teens in schools with bathroom restrictions are at higher risk of sexual assault, study says (CNN, 5/6)

WORKFORCE
– This co-working space doubles as a child care center. (WAMU, 5/6)

– Participants in a District workforce development program have not received the training they expected and are still unemployed. (CP, 5/2)

PRISON REFORM
– The District is looking into how it might obtain local control over the parole system again. (DCist, 5/1)

Maryland just banned placing pregnant inmates in solitary confinement. Yes, that was apparently happening. (WaPo, 5/1)

VIRGINIA | Fairfax board adopts budget with more for affordable housing, environment (WaPo, 3/7)

DISTRICT | The DC Inspector General says the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs has failed to track and collect on fines from businesses, developers and landlords who break the rules. (WAMU, 3/7)

COMMUNITY | Congrats to Natalie Madeira Cofield, founder & CEO of Walker’s Legacy and the Walker’s Legacy Foundation, for being named the Women in Business Champion of the Year by the DC Chamber of Commerce. (Walker’s Legacy Foundation is a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG.)

PHILANTHROPY | New CEO at Council on Foundations Pledges Greater Accountability (Chronicle, 5/1)


Sleep in a ‘Glamping Globe’ on the roof of the Watergate? Yes please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

Gentrification in the District is leading to widespread displacement of low-income residents

GENTRIFICATION | According to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School, low-income residents are being pushed out of DC neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country. The newly-released study tracked demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods across the country from 2000 to 2016. (WaPo, 4/26)

“For all the talk of gentrification happening in cities all over the country, what we found is that it really isn’t,” said Myron Orfield, director of the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity … “Washington is one of the few places in the country where real displacement is actually occurring. It’s quite rare.” More than 38 percent of District residents, including about 35 percent of low-income residents, live in census tracts that are growing economically … but low-income people who live in those areas are at the greatest risk of displacement … the study comes as gentrification and its consequences are being discussed with renewed urgency in the nation’s capital.

Related: This study complements the recent National Community Reinvestment Coalition report that found that DC had the “highest intensity” gentrification in the country, with 20,000 African-American residents displaced from their neighborhoods between 2000 and 2013. (WaPo, 3/19)

DISABILITY RIGHTS/PHILANTHROPY | According to a just-released report by the disability-rights group RespectAbility, nonprofits and foundations must do a better job of hiring, accommodating, and including people with disabilities. The report finds that only 24 percent of nonprofits and foundations have at least one board member with a disability. (Chronicle, 4/25 – Subscription)

EDUCATION
Opinion: Public schools in Montgomery County are growing in the amount of students, and they are also growing more segregated by race and class. (GGWash, 4/24)

–  The District leads the region, and nation, in universal preschool enrollment. (WAMU, 4/17)

RACIAL EQUITY | The Arlington County Board has voted to formally request Jefferson Davis Highway be changed to Richmond Highway, which if approved, will be changed in October. (WAMU, 4/26)

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
With new regulations in hand, DC businesses and developers ready to embrace ‘opportunity zones’ (WBJ, 4/24)

How Philanthropy Can Ensure Opportunity Zones Ensure Widespread Economic Renewal (Chronicle, 4/25 – Subscription)

HEALTH
– Some DC Residents Can Exchange Prescriptions for Produce (CP, 4/22)

– The Washington-Baltimore region has just been ranked as the 16th most ozone-polluted city in the US according to the annual State of the Air report, by the American Lung Association. (WTOP, 4/24)

INEQUALITY | A thought-provoking article on inequality and the failures of unrestrained capitalism. (WaPo, 4/20)

COMMUNITY | Bainum Family Foundation Appoints Jacquelyn Davis as New CEO and President

ENVIRONMENT/ART | It’s Not Just Trash, It’s Art: Maryland Park Installation Highlights Pollution Crisis (WAMU, 4/25)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health – New!
Development Operations Manager | World Central Kitchen – New!
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Institutional Writing and Strategy​ | ​League of Conservation Voters Education Fund
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Development Director​ | ​Greater DC Diaper Bank
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Racial Justice Program Officer​ | ​Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Officer​ | ​The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
President and CEO | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Takoma Park’s 100-year history has led to it being called the “Berkeley of the East”

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday!

– Buffy

New committee to address disproportionate maternal mortality among African-American women in DC

HEALTH/RACE
– Joining nearly 30 other jurisdictions, including Maryland and Virginia, a new Maternal Mortality Review Committee has been created to address the disproportionate death rates of African-American women in the District. The committee is made up of various maternal health experts and was formed after several years of calls to study the deaths of pregnant women and new mothers in DC. (WAMU, 4/12)

With rates double that of the nation’s, Washington is home to a decades-long maternal mortality crisis. Nearly 75 percent of District mothers who died of complications from pregnancy, labor and childbirth between 2014 and 2016 were African American. Nationally, black women are three to four times more likely to die than white women. According to the CDC, nationally, from 2011 to 2013, black women experienced roughly 43.5 deaths per 100,000 live births on average, compared to 12.7 deaths for white mothers. One reason for the disparity, says Ebony Marcelle, Director of midwifery at Community of Hope’s Family Health and Birth Center, is that the health risks associated with childbirth are coupled with racial bias in the medical field. Black women, she says, are often dismissed or ignored by health care providers.

COMMUNITY | Crystal Carr Townsend, President of the Healthcare Initiative Foundation, WRAG Board Member, and member of WRAG’s Healthy Communities Working Group, is profiled in Bethesda Magazine. The piece highlights HIF’s work in Germantown to build a collaborative approach to ensuring that low-income families have critical health and wellness services. (Bethesda Magazine, 4/8)

EQUITY | Banks in DC are increasingly concentrated in affluent neighborhoods, while other areas that could benefit from more banking options are still underserved by financial institutions. (WAMU, 4/10)

HOUSING 
– A new bill in the DC Council would require the creation of more affordable housing when quasi-governmental agencies sell or redevelop their own properties. (WBJ, 4/10)

RACE/EDUCATION | Georgetown Students Vote On Proposal To Make Amends For University’s Slaveholding Past (WAMU, 4/11)

EDUCATION/SAFETY | Pre-K and elementary students are learning safety skills on their new kid-sized roadway at Thomas Elementary School in Northeast DC. (WAMU, 4/1)

PHILANTHROPY
– How and why funders can invest more in the pro-immigrant movement. (NCRP, 4/11)

–  This Is What A Philanthropist Looks Like (Refinery29, 4/9)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director of Institutional Writing and Strategy​ | ​League of Conservation Voters Education Fund – New!
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation – New!
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation – New!
Development Director​ | ​Greater DC Diaper Bank
Program & Marketing Coordinator​ | ​ACT for Alexandria
Grants Manager, Data and Reporting​ | ​The Colorado Health Organization
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Racial Justice Program Officer​ | ​Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Officer​ | ​The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
President and CEO | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Grants Program Specialist | Jack and Jill Foundation
Director of Development Partnerships – New England | League of Conservation Voters
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Spring has sprung, and our region has over 100 public gardens to prove it.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday next week!

– Buffy