Homelessness survey in the District points to need for regional cooperation

HOMELESSNESS | A new survey released this week shows that one-third of people currently experiencing homelessness in DC used to have homes in Maryland, Virginia or another state. (WAMU, 6/12)

The question of where DC’s homeless come from isn’t new — and it is often politically fraught. The survey won’t be used to try and limit homeless services to DC residents, according to Kristy Greenwalt, the director of the Interagency Council on Homelessness … she hopes it will spur better regional coordination on tackling homelessness which has been a topic of conversation among local leaders for some time … “We just wanted to learn a little more about people’s experience and what’s driving their decision-making. Were they originally from the District and lost housing and left and are returning to a support network? Are they from somewhere else and are coming here because they couldn’t get help in their jurisdiction?” Greenwalt says.

HOUSING
–  Why’s everyone talking about upzoning? It’s the foundation of green, equitable cities. (GGWash, 6/11)

– DC’s affordable housing is extremely inequitably distributed across the city, according to this image from the DC Office of Planning. (GGWash, 6/5)

FOOD | In Farm-to-Table 2.0, Local Farmers Are Partners Not Purveyors (CP, 6/12)

ENVIRONMENT | The Anacostia River suffered after the region’s wettest year on record, which has brought trash, waste and dirt that is harming the river. (WAMU, 6/11)

HEALTH | Absence Of ‘Harris Rider’ Could Put D.C. One Step Closer To Recreational Marijuana Dispensaries (WAMU, 6/12)

EDUCATION | DC Charter School Leaders Campaign For More Space (WAMU, 6/12)

ART/CULTURE | The Smithsonian Institution has picked a 10-story building by the L’Enfant Plaza Metro in Southwest DC for its new headquarters, which sets the stage for the institution’s larger planned South Mall campus renovation. (WBJ, 6/11)

PHILANTHROPY
The Rise, Fall, and Possible Rebirth of 100 Resilient Cities (CityLab, 6/12)

– Assets at Small Foundations Declined 3.5% Last Year, Study Shows (Chronicle, 6/12)

ANNOUNCEMENT | WRAG is excited to introduce our newest team member, Carmen Rodriguez, Director of Communication, Technology, and Administration! With Carmen on board, I am closing out my time as WRAG’s communications consultant responsible for producing the (Almost) Daily WRAG. It has been a true pleasure bringing you the (Almost) Daily over the past six months as WRAG builds its new team.

This summer, the Daily will go on “vacation” as WRAG assesses its communications strategy and needs going forward. We will continue to bring you occasional updates using this platform, but we will not produce a regular news roundup. In the meantime, we would love to hear from readers: What have you valued about the Daily WRAG? What would you like to see more of from WRAG? Less of? We welcome your thoughts via this quick survey.

We look forward to sharing with you our new communications strategy later this year!


Social Sector Job Openings 

Institutional Development Manager | Martha’s Table – New!
Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


An app to find the best happy hour in DC? Yes, please – cheers to a great summer!

– Buffy

Lack of foster parents in DC puts vulnerable children at risk

CHILDREN/FAMILIES | There is a shortage of foster parents in DC, which child welfare advocates say is putting children at risk of harm. Some children have even had to sleep at the office of DC’s Child and Family Services Agency while they waited to be placed in a home. (WAMU, 4/8)

“We’ve seen cases where kids have been exposed to a lot of violence, have been physically hurt, but have remained in their homes … because there are not enough foster homes right now” … the shortage has been caused in part by increased housing costs, experienced foster parents retiring, and changing demographics in the city. A spokesperson for DC’s Child and Family Service Agency says they are looking to add 40 new beds in the foster care system over this fiscal year … and specifically have a shortage of parents for children with special needs and for older children.

Related: Last year, WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland, urged philanthropy to focus on the child welfare system, a topic that is often invisible to many in our region. (Daily, 9/2018)

ARTS & CULTURE
– DC’s first-ever cultural plan lays out a strategy for growth through investments, infrastructure and programming. The plan was developed by the DC Office of Planning, in consultation with the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment – and includes input from over 1,500 artists, art consumers, and experts from the cultural sector. (WAMU, 4/4)

– The owner of Bethesda’s Union Hardware is promoting a plan to open a collective art studio in downtown Bethesda for up to 30 artists by this summer. (Bethesda Magazine, 4/3)

ECONOMIC INEQUALITY | America’s growing geographic divide derives from economic inequality, especially the tremendous gains of the one percent. (CityLab, 4/3)

EDUCATION
– DC’s Low-Income Neighborhood Schools Are Losing Money. Is The Budget Or Enrollment To Blame? (WAMU, 4/5)

– In Montgomery County, a $5.7 billion budget proposal is being questioned by those who want to see more money focused on education. (WaPo, 4/7)

MARYLAND | Mike Busch, the longest-serving state House speaker in Maryland history who helped shepherd laws that improved access to health care and legalized same-sex marriage, died on April 7 at age 72. (WaPo, 4/7)

VIRGINIA | As Amazon builds and staffs up HQ2, other tech companies who orbit them could follow. (WBJ, 4/4)

FOOD | Hungry, a new Arlington-based healthy food delivery service, has received star-powered support. (WAMU, 4/5)

PHILANTHROPY | The Road Ahead: Will Philanthropic Critique Change Philanthropic Practice? (NPQ, 4/4)


How would you improve the Metro map when it’s reprinted?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

Government shutdown coincides with slowest time for charitable donations

NONPROFITS | Nonprofit organizations in the Greater Washington region are receiving an influx of calls for assistance during what is typically known as the worst months for charitable donations – and nonprofit leaders are worried about keeping up with the demand. Rosie Allen-Herring, president and chief executive of the United Way of the National Capital Area, said nonprofit groups have emphasized to her that the need they’re seeing around the Washington area is outstripping the support they were prepared to provide. (WaPo, 1/9)

“It’s not just the 800,000 workers we’re hearing about almost daily,” Allen-Herring said. “There’s another rung of smaller, more disadvantaged businesses who contract with the federal government. Those employees aren’t going to be made whole” with potential back pay when the shutdown ends.

RACIAL EQUITY
– In order to combat structural and institutional racism affecting DC, Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie has introduced the Racial Equity Achieves Results Act, which lays out specific actions to advance racial equity, including designing and implementing a racial equity tool, racial equity-related performance measures and evaluations, and racial equity training for all District employees.

-Diversity and race are top issue priorities for PwC Chairman Tim Ryan. (Chief Executive, 1/9)

Related: Bold Leadership: How Companies are Stepping Up and Speaking Out on Hot Button Issues (Daily, 9/17)

IMPACT INVESTING | A decade-long push has urged foundations to devote more of their endowments to impact investing. But many still aren’t invested in line with their mission. (Chronicle, 1/8)

EDUCATION | Prince George’s schools start fund to buy lunches for children of furloughed workers (WaPo, 1/10)

HOUSING | See How Landlords Pack Section 8 Renters Into Poorer Neighborhoods (CityLab, 1/9)

FOOD | A new mobile pantry vehicle, funded in part by the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, is set to feed thousands in Loudoun County. (Loudoun Times, 1/2)

GRANTS
– The Community Foundation of Northern Virginia announced their 2019 Community Investment Funds Grant Cycle – proposals due: 2/14/19.

– CareFirst will award up to $2 million to support programs seeking to improve birth outcomes and lower infant mortality rates in Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia – proposals due: 1/14/19.


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants & Communications Officer | The Crimsonbridge Foundation – New!
Executive Director | VHC Medical Brigade – New!
Director of Development | DC Bar Foundation – New!
Program Manager | Weissberg Foundation – New!
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Grant Reviewer​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Administrative Associate | United Philanthropy Forum
Programs Manager | DC127
Development Manager | DC127
Director of Development (East Coast) | Rocketship Public Schools
Director of Development | ECHO
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
President | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Looks like it’s going to feel a bit more like winter this weekend – here’s some DC hot spots where you can find “ridiculously delicious hot chocolate.”

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

– Buffy

DC Mayor Bowser sets a goal of building 36,000 new housing units by 2025

HOUSING
– At the start of her second term in office, DC’s Mayor Muriel Bowser wants to increase the production of new housing in order to meet the pressing need for housing affordability in the District. (WAMU, 1/8)

“Bowser has even set a goal for D.C.: 36,000 new housing units by 2025, the city’s portion of the estimated 235,000 housing units the Washington region will have to produce in that period to keep up with job growth. Currently, the region is expected to produce 170,000 housing units over the next six years. Housing analysts say the mayor’s goal is enthusiastic, though achievable.”

WRAG’s Vice President, Gretchen Greiner-Lott, had this to say regarding the Mayor’s announcement:

“Housing affordability is an ever-growing issue throughout our region so it is exciting to see Mayor Bowser acknowledge the issue and pledge to make it her number one priority. As she says, we all have to “think big and differently” about how to produce more housing. The Housing Leaders Group of Greater Washington’s Guidebook for Increasing Housing Affordability in the Greater Washington Region would be a great place to start.”

Alexandria lost 90% of its affordable homes in the past few decades. Is it really ‘radical’ to build more? (GGWash, 1/8)

ENVIRONMENT | In a new report, scientists say the health of the Chesapeake Bay deteriorated in 2018 after years of improvement. (WaPo, 1/8)

EQUITY/DISABILITY RIGHTS | Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi, head of RespectAbility and the Mizrahi Family Charitable Trust, is powerfully pushing for philanthropy to focus on equality for people with disabilities. (Chronicle, 1/8)

EDUCATION | Schools tackle anxiety over food and fees as shutdown shows no sign of ending (WaPo, 1/8)

TRANSPORTATION | Lyft is offering low-cost rides to grocery stores in Wards 7 and 8. What’s a sustainable solution? (GGW, 1/7)

COMMUNITY | We were saddened to learn last month of the passing of Vicki Sant, a longtime philanthropic leader in the Greater Washington region, and the founder, along with her husband Roger Sant, of the Summit Foundation, as well as the Summit Fund. A memorial service will be held on January 16 at the Kennedy Center. Details can be found here.

NONPROFITS | The application for the 2019-2020 Catalogue for Philanthropy is now open. Click here for details.


We are on day 19 of the government shutdown – from museum visits to tours, here’s some things you can still do.

– Buffy

Bread for the City plans to open a new, larger facility in Anacostia

POVERTY/NONPROFITS | Citing an increased need for food, medical care and social services, Bread for the City is preparing to expand its operation in DC. Set to open in 2020, the new Anacostia location will serve at least 2,000 additional people monthly. (WaPo, 1/6)

George Jones, the organization’s chief executive, said the need is, in part, fueled by gentrification that has intensified the gap between wealthy and poor residents. A recent report by the D.C. Chamber of Commerce highlighted the chasm. Since 2009, it says, the city has lost more than 4,000 families with yearly incomes below $35,000, while gaining more than 10,000 families with incomes above $200,000 over the same span.

PHILANTHROPY | In her first column of 2019, WRAG’s president Tamara Lucas Copeland shares her thoughts on three important trends in philanthropy that she believes will impact the region this year. (Daily, 1/7)

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS | Check out the Miriam’s Kitchen “Change Agent of the Month” interview with Katy Moore, Managing Director, Corporate Strategy at WRAG and Founder and Director of the Institute of Corporate Social Responsibility. She is also a member of the Leadership Council at Miriam’s Kitchen. (What’s the Dish Corporate Social Impact eNewsletter, 12/18)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM | The city of Alexandria joins the national trend of limiting the use of cash bail in misdemeanor, low-risk, nonviolent cases. (WaPo, 1/6)

EDUCATION | D.C. Council prepares for rigorous confirmation hearing on pick for schools chancellor (WaPo, 1/6)

FOOD | New Ward 8 Grocery Store Breaks Ground — And Barriers — To Fresh Food. (WAMU, 1/13)

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY | Interesting piece by Tim McClimon, head faculty member of the Institute for CSR, highlighting Five CSR Trends to Watch in 2019. (Forbes, 1/19)

GRANTS | The Jack & Jill of America Foundation is recruiting grant reviewers experienced in the areas of education, health/wellness, and strengthening black families. Details here.


It’s great to be back as Editor of the (Almost) Daily WRAG on a modified schedule for the next few months! This week we will publish on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

I’m looking forward to sharing important news, helpful resources, and interesting pieces, including this list of New Years resolutions for movie lovers.

– Buffy

Virginia’s economy has recovered from the recession, according to a new report

ECONOMY | A recent report from Old Dominion University has found that Virginia has finally recovered from the 2008 recession. The report cites the state’s dependence on federal government spending, like other jurisdictions in the region, as a major reason why it took so long. (WaPo, 12/15)

Virginia’s gross domestic product, a measure of all goods and services, has grown for five consecutive quarters since March 2017, the ODU report found. That’s a surge of strength for an economy that had been stubbornly anemic. Once a powerhouse state, Virginia lagged the nation as a whole in economic growth for six years in a row, with some quarters tumbling into contraction.

A big reason the state took so long to recover from the recession is that government spending was slow to ramp back up. Sequestration — the trick Congress used in 2013 to impose automatic government spending cuts — has hamstrung Virginia’s economy ever since.

WRAG ANNOUNCEMENT | Yanique Redwood, president and CEO of the Consumer Health Foundation and chair of WRAG’s board of directors, has announced her decision to resign from WRAG’s board. Nicky Goren, president and CEO of the Meyer Foundation and current vice chair of WRAG’s board will move immediately into the position of Chair. Read more here (WRAG, 12/17)

CSR | Katy Moore, WRAG’s managing director of corporate strategy, presents the business case for corporate community involvement in a new blog. (Daily, 12/17)

PUBLIC SAFETY | I’m a Trauma Surgeon and a Shooting Victim. I Have Every Right to Speak Out on Gun Violence. (Atlantic, 12/15)

REGION | For the first time, the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments has nominated board leaders who are all Black. It has also approved all women for its 2019 Corporate Officers. (WTOP, 12/15)

CHARITABLE GIVING | Why You Shouldn’t Donate Angry: Pitfalls of Rage Giving (YES! Magazine, 12/12)

FOOD | The new farm bill includes funding for grants that specifically help farmers of color and indigenous communities. (Atlantic, 12/16)


Hey all! I’ve really enjoyed my time here at WRAG and creating the Daily WRAG for two years, but I’m writing to say Wednesday will be my last day. Thanks to everyone who’s engaged with the Daily or have left a comment or an email. Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz, who served as Daily WRAG editor before, will take over writing the Daily – on a modified schedule- in the new year.

– Kendra


REMINDER | Daily WRAG readers, we want your opinion! In order to improve your reading experience, we ask that you complete this short survey by Wednesday, December 19 to let us know what you like and what could be better on the blog.


Here’s something to make you smile on this Monday:

work joke
– Reader’s Digest

Providence Hospital is set to shut down some of its services on Friday

HEALTHCARE | On Friday, DC’s Providence Hospital will shutdown its acute-care services. Although the hospital recently announced it will keep its emergency room open until April 2019, many residents, advocates and nurses still worry about the impact on the neighborhood and communities east of the river. (WAMU, 12/11)

At a rally Tuesday outside of the hospital, nurses said that residents east of the Anacostia River still need a “fully-functional hospital.”

Healthcare advocates say residents living in the eastern part of the District already have limited options for care; several hospitals are clustered on the western side of D.C.

“We are not satisfied with what Ascension is doing here. They are offering a small and I think dangerous hospital, potentially,” said Stephen Frum, a labor representative with National Nurses United, the union which represents nurses at Providence.

BUSINESS | ACT for Alexandria, the Arlington Community Foundation, the Community Foundation for Loudoun & Northern Fauquier Counties, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, and the Greater Washington Community Foundation sent a letter to welcome Amazon to Northern Virginia. Read it here (CFNova, 12/15)

PHILANTHROPY
How the Neighborhood Funder Group is Disrupting Funder-Grantee Dynamics (Surdna Foundation, 12/5)

– Vu Le, Nonprofit AF blogger, warns progressive funders that they can learn from conservative funders and lists a few of their strengths. (NAF, 12/10)

INCOME | A new idea to address income inequality in the US is becoming popular – having the government provide a job with good wages for everyone who isn’t employed. (Citylab, 12/10)

FOOD | New Program Offers Southeast D.C. Families Discounted Rides To Grocery Stores (WAMU, 12/11)

EDUCATION | Arlington County, Alexandria and DC are all creating a more inclusive school environment for students who identify as nonbinary or transgender. (DCist, 12/10)

ENVIRONMENT | D.C. backs away from special water rate relief for churches (WaPo, 12/11)


REMINDER | Daily WRAG readers, we want your opinion! In order to improve your reading experience, we ask that you complete this short survey by Wednesday, December 19 to let us know what you like and what could be better on the blog.


Ready for an afternoon snack? Get a dozen Krispy Kreme doughnuts today for $1.

– Kendra