Economists predict the rise of inequality and the end of retail

ECONOMY | The Bureau of Labor Statistics has released its 10-year forecast for the future of the United States’ labor market. The predictions include an increase in jobs for healthcare workers as our population grows older, the decline of retail as online shopping grows, and the rise of inequality as a result of jobs typically associated with the middle class declining. (Atlantic, 10/26)

These 10-year-forecast reports—the products of two years’ work from about 25 economists at the BLS —document the government’s best assessment of the fastest and slowest growing jobs of the future. On the decline are automatable work, like typists, and occupations threatened by changing consumer behavior, like clothing store cashiers, as more people shop online.

The fastest-growing jobs through 2026 belong to what one might call the Three Cs: care, computers, and clean energy. No occupation is projected to add more workers than personal-care aides, who perform non-medical duties for older Americans, such as bathing and cooking. Along with home-health aides, these two occupations are projected to create 1.1 million new jobs in the next decade. Remarkably, that’s 10 percent of the total 11.5 million jobs that the BLS expects the economy to add. Clean-energy workers, like solar-panel installers and wind-turbine technicians, are the only occupations that are expected to double by 2026. Mathematicians and statisticians round out the top-10 list.

HOMELESSNESS | The “war on sitting,” a trend across the United States to remove benches from public spaces, is negatively impacting homeless individuals and older citizens. (Citylab, 10/20)

POVERTY | Wells Fargo co-hosted an event for the Faces of Loudoun campaign, which WRAG worked on with the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties, to bring awareness to the challenges faced by low-income families in Loudoun County. (Loudoun Times, 10/25)

PHILANTHROPY | Timothy McCue, director of grant programs for Potomac Health Foundation, discussed his organization’s grantmaking strategy with Faith Mitchell, president of Grantmakers In Health, in GIH’s podcast series, “Fresh Perspectives: Voices from the Field“. (GIH, 7/31)

EDUCATION | As DACA winds down, 20,000 educators are in limbo (WaPo, 10/25)

PUBLIC SAFETY | The District’s new Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement will work with community members that live in under-invested wards to prevent violence. (WaPo, 10/25)

NONPROFITS | Asking What’s Next and Encouraging Offbeat Ideas: Essential Ingredients for Innovation (Chronicle, 10/3 – Subscription needed)


The Blair Witch Project celebrates 20 years with a special screening at the Library of Congress this weekend.

– Kendra

Friday roundup – March 21 through March 25, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Reflections on implicit bias were shared by Board Chair Missy Young and lead staffer Dara Johnson from the Horning Family Fund. (Daily 3/24)

– The Consumer Health Foundation‘s Kendra Allen interviewed Sequnely Gray, Community Engagement Coordinator for So Others Might Eat and a TANF recipient, about her experience advocating for families on TANF and the impact of benefit time limits. (CHF, 3/21)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/REGION
– A new report found significant racial disparities in the acceptance rates among selective academic programs at public schools in Montgomery County. (WaPo, 3/22)

 In Loudoun County, a proposal that would concentrate mostly low-income, majority Hispanic students into two schools is evoking memories of “separate but equal” policies of the past. (WaPo, 3/20) 

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
–  Grantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, released a supplement on health equity innovations, published with the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016)

–  OpinionThe color of heroin addiction — why war then, treatment now? (WaPo, 3/23)

THIS WEEK IN CSR
 The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Are you #TeamPancakes or #TeamWaffles? Personally, I found both to be far too filling.

– Ciara

New report on investing in the good food system

FOOD
Arabella Advisors has released a new report, “Investing to Strengthen the Good Food Supply Chain,” and accompanying graphic, “On the Road to Good Food,” identifying areas where they believe capital investments can yield powerful investment returns and significant impact in expanding access to good food.

Developing the infrastructure to supply good food will require more than philanthropy alone can deliver. Most of the solutions we need must come from private-sector commitments—specifically, from investments in companies across the food supply chain that can bring more sustainable, healthy, and affordable food to market

CSR | The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.

HEALTHGrantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, recently released a supplement on health equity innovations, published in the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016

EDUCATION/INFRASTRUCTURE | A new report looks at the conditions of school buildings across the country, and finds that many are in dire need of maintenance to the tune of an estimated $112 billion to ensure they are safe spaces in good condition. (WaPo, 3/22)

DISTRICT/WORKFORCE | D.C. mayor calls for raising minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020 (WaPo, 3/22)

ARTS
– A new interactive exhibit, “In it Together: Service Members, Community and Dialogue Through Art” at the Lorton Workhouse Arts Center, showcases artwork from service members and veterans. (Inside NOVA, 3/22)

–  D.C. Artists Protest Washington Post No-TYA-Review Policy (AT, 3/22)

– Have you been wondering what happened to those plastic white balls from last year’s “The Beach” exhibit at the National Building Museum? Look no further than the forthcoming Dupont Underground. (WaPo, 3/22)


Sometimes, this is what happens when you ask the Internet to name things.

– Ciara 

 

There is no post racial America. Does philanthropy know?

PHILANTHROPY
As we celebrate the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. this week, it’s easy to think of the country as a dramatically different place than it was in the 1960s. In an op-ed in the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Tamara Lucas Copeland challenges the notion of a postracial America and explains why WRAG is working to foster a better understanding among funders about the dynamics of racism. (Chronicle, 1/21)

[P]hilanthropy’s commitment to aiding the poor continues today, through efforts to improve access to quality education, health care, and housing. Many donors and foundations consider work on such programs vital to attacking the root causes of inequity in America. They believe that if we keep focusing on financing ideas we know work, soon we will reduce the problems for both blacks and whites and eliminate all disparities.

But a growing number of grant makers in Washington have decided it’s important to challenge this notion, to recognize that the distinct, negative treatment of a group of people based solely on race is a major contributor to poverty and inequality in America. We believe that racism is rarely acknowledged or discussed by members of the public or within philanthropy. And we believe that until that silence ends, our region, and our country, won’t be able to take the steps needed to end racial inequities.

To learn more about Putting Racism on the Table, WRAG’s learning series for philanthropic CEOs and trustees, click here.

– The National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP)  is taking nominations for foundations for their 2016 NCRP Impact Awards. You can nominate up to 10 foundations that demonstrate exemplary grantmaking, leadership in funding social change strategies, and commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity.

HEALTH/FOOD | Grantmakers in Health shares policy options and recommendations that recently came out of a meeting of experts, funders, and health practitioners on the ways to support healthier eating policies – particularly around sugar-sweetened beverages that are disproportionately consumed by low-income individuals and ethnic minorities. (GIH, 1/19)

EDUCATION | According to new data, Maryland saw a record high of close to 880,000 students this school year – a 5,000 student increase from the previous school year. Most of the surge has taken place in Montgomery, Howard, Baltimore, Prince George’s and Anne Arundel counties. (WaPo, 1/ 20)

ARTS | With government-commissioned street art being a relatively new thing in the District, Washingtonian offers a glimpse at five D.C. street artists whose work has popped up throughout the area. (Washingtonian, 1/19) Some readers might recognize the work of Kelly Towles, the artist who created the centerpieces for WRAG’s 2011 annual meeting.

TRANSIT/INEQUALITY | Yet More Evidence That Bike-Share Isn’t Reaching the Poor (City Lab, 1/19)


Have you experienced a void in your life ever since the popular television series ‘Friends’ went off the air? Someone developed a computer program that can write new episodes…for better or for worse.

– Ciara

Achievement gap begins as early as infancy for D.C. children

DISTRICT/YOUTH
Despite being a national leader in providing universal preschool access to four- and five-year-olds, children in the District face an achievement gap that begins as early as infancy. According to a new study by Child Trends commissioned by the Bainum Family Foundation, there are significant disparities that persist in the lives of children in D.C. across neighborhood, racial, and class lines. (WaPo, 12/10)

The report, which draws on several years of local and federal data, describes “a tale of two cities” in the District — with children in the poorest neighborhoods, in Wards 7 and 8 east of the Anacostia River, born a world apart from those in the wealthiest neighborhoods, in Ward 3.

COMMUNITY | Grantmakers in Health has announced their newly-elected board members. Congratulations to WRAG Board Chair and president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Health Foundation Patricia N. Mathews on being among one of the new board members! (GIH, 12/9)

WORKFORCE | Mayor names Busboys and Poets owner Andy Shallal to key jobs post (WaPo, 12/14)

HEALTH
– A recent analysis by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute reveals that technical problems with D.C.’s Medicaid application system have created a backlog that may leave many low-income residents without health coverage. (WCP, 12/14)

Opinion: Why Are So Many Black Women Dying of AIDS? (NYT, 12/11)

POVERTY | When Government Tells Poor People How to Live (City Lab, 12/14)

PHILANTHROPY | What role does philanthropy play in fostering social movements? Here’s a brief history of how philanthropy found its place in joining the movement for school discipline reform. (Inside Philanthropy, 12/8)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Should social profit organizations model themselves to be more like businesses? To those that say, “absolutely,” one author presents a brief list of demands that social profit organizations will need from everyone else in order to do so. (NWB, 12/14)


A day in the life of Darth Vader.

– Ciara 

Meet the 2015-2016 Philanthropy Fellows

(Back row: Catherine Oidtman, Rebecca Kates, Sarah Gordon; Front row: Hannah Davis, Dominique Covelli, Jessica Finkel)

The Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers is excited to welcome the 2015-2016 Philanthropy Fellows! Nine students from the University of Maryland’s Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership are working at WRAG member organizations this year:

  • Alex Gabriel is undertaking research for the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy’s foundation assessment initiative, Philamplify, with Lisa Ranghelli.
  • Catherine Oidtman is working with Crystal Townsend of the Healthcare Initiative Foundation, assisting with grants administration and the implementation of the HIF Scholars professional mentoring program.
  • Dominique Covelli is strengthening Grantmakers in Health’s communications and marketing efforts with Leila Polintan.
  • Hannah Davis is supporting the development and administration of WRAG’s Institute for Corporate Social Responsibility with Katy Moore.
  • Jessica Finkel is assisting with the design of Kaiser Permanente’s philanthropic strategy, working with Tanya Edelin.
  • Mary Kolar is supporting the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region’s Safety Net Initiative and Philanthropic Services grantmaking programs with Silvana Straw.
  • Rebecca Kates is supporting grantmaking, communications, and donor services with Amina Anderson at the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region.
  • Sarah Gordon is working with Phyllis Kaye and WRAG’s Healthy Communities Working Group on developing effective communications about the social determinants of health to reach a wider funder audience.
  • Shaundra Patterson is researching potential national funding partners with Nicky Goren in support of the Meyer Foundation’s new strategic plan.

These students are gaining valuable professional experience in philanthropy, making new connections in the community, and bringing fresh ideas and energy to their host organizations. To learn more about each fellow, click here. Check out our website to learn more about WRAG’s Philanthropy Fellows program.

46 percent of area renters live in cost-burdened households

AFFORDABLE HOUSING/REGION
A new report by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies finds that 46 percent of renters in the metropolitan Washington area are cost burdened (spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing). Additionally, 22.4 percent of renters in the area are considered severely cost burdened (spend more than half of their income on housing). (WCP, 7/31)

If that sounds bad, a look at the report’s breakdown of renter-households by income shows that housing costs in the D.C. metropolitan area are, frankly, regressive: 81.2 percent of households that make less than $15,000 a year are cost burdened, while only 9.2 percent of households that make more than $75,000 a year are cost burdened. (An average 70.1 percent of households making between $15,000 and $75,000 a year are cost burdened.)

Among homeowners in the area, the numbers are less severe:  A quarter of homeowners have housing cost burdens, and 10 percent have severe housing cost burdens. The median income for this group is $112,000, or roughly double that of renters in the region. Housing costs are regressive for them, too: 93.3 percent of owner households making under $15,000 a year spend more than 30 percent of their income on homes, whereas 11 percent do so among $75,000-and-up-ers.

Bottom line: Living in the D.C. region is increasingly hard to afford. As the report states, “cost-burdened households are forced to cut back on food, healthcare, and other critical expenses.”

WRAG/SOCIAL PROFITS | WRAG president Tamara Copeland revisits the need for a different, more accurate name for what is so commonly referred to as the “nonprofit sector.” Check out why she’s committed to making sure we all update our language to reflect what should be called the “social profit sector.” (Daily, 8/3)

PHILANTHROPY
– Faith Mitchell of Grantmakers in Health discusses why it is so important for funders to support long-term, upstream strategies to address lingering inequalities.(HistPhil, 7/27)

– A new study takes a look at the world’s 10 largest private foundations. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Li Ka Shing Foundation top the list. (Chronicle, 7/31)

ARTS
– In one of the largest corporate donations ever made to the arts center, The Boeing Company has announced a gift of $20 million to support the Kennedy Center’s upcoming expansion project. (WaPo, 7/29)

Mellon Foundation Releases the First Comprehensive Survey on Diversity in American Art Museums (Mellon Foundation, 7/29)

JOBS | Exponent Philanthropy is hiring a new Director of Corporate Partnerships. Click here to learn about this exciting opportunity.


Did you somehow miss Friday night’s blue moon? Don’t fret. Here are some stunning photos from the occurrence. 

– Ciara