Where you live in DC determines the availability of medical care

HEALTH 
– Where people live in D.C. affects their access to non-emergency medical care. In addition to emergency vehicles taking longer to get east of the Anacostia River, fewer clinics, pharmacies, and vaccination centers means access to non-emergency medical care is more difficult there as well. (GGW, 10/4)

No urgent care or retail clinics have opened in Wards 4 or 8 since 2010, and nearly 70% of all D.C.’s clinics are in Wards 2 and 3. This gap is partially filled by community health centers. Community health centers receive federal funding to provide primary care to underserved populations. One such clinic, Unity Health Care, operates a community health centers in all wards except 2, 3, and 4, with varying degrees of walk-in services.

– ‘An act of kindness’: Medical aid-in-dying legislation advances in the District (WaPo, 10/6)

TRANSPORTATIONMontgomery’s new bus rapid transit system will make the county more equitable (GGW, 10/5)

EDUCATION
– Study finds 10 percent of Virginia schoolchildren are chronically absent (WaPo, 10/5)

– Although it hasn’t been discussed much on the campaign trail, education is on the minds of the electorate. (Atlantic, 10/1)

LGBT | For D.C.’s LGBT Community, A Police Liaison Who Can Relate (WAMU, 10/6)

NONPROFITS Corporate America Emerging Source for Nonprofit CFOs (NPQ, 10/5)

ENVIRONMENT | The James River in Virginia at Jamestown, where America’s first permanent English settlement was founded in 1607, was just cited as being among America’s “most endangered” historic places by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. (WTOP, 10/5)

MARYLAND | Two months after a flood ravaged downtown Ellicott City, Maryland, killing two people and ruining businesses and houses, Main Street will reopen on October 6. (WTOP, 10/5)

ARTOne Photographer Chronicles 30 Years of Life in Our City (City Paper, 10/6)

PHILANTHROPY
– Hurricane Matthew, the decade’s most powerful Atlantic tropical storm, has devastated parts of the Caribbean and is now expected to have a significant impact on the East Coast of the United States the next few days. Here’s how funders can help. (Center for Disaster Philanthropy, 10/6)

– Philanthropy and Social Innovation in the Age of #BlackLivesMatter (Invested Impact, 10/3)

 – How Philanthropy Can Help Bridge America’s Political Divide (SSIR, 9/30)


Social Sector Job Openings
Director, Community Affairs – NCA | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
President & CEO | Delaware Grantmakers Association
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital
Senior Program Manager, Community Benefits | Kaiser Permanente
Nonprofit Financial Planning and Analysis Manager | Arabella Advisors
Education Finance and Policy Analyst | DC Fiscal Policy Institute
Communications Director | Grantmakers In Health
Program Director | Grantmakers In Health
Analyst | Arabella Advisors
Grants Coordinator | City of Takoma Park

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to seder@washingtongrantmakers.org. 


So much to learn about the tunnels under Capitol Hill.

The (Almost) Daily will be back on Tuesday!

– Buffy

Friday roundup – January 19 through 22, 2016

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
In an op-ed in the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Tamara Lucas Copeland challenged the notion of a postracial America and explained why WRAG is working to foster a better understanding among funders about the dynamics of racism. (Chronicle, 1/21)

– The Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers, the Council of New Jersey Grantmakers, and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy partnered to release the Disaster Philanthropy Playbook, a comprehensive resource to help philanthropy respond to future disasters.

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Maryland saw a record high of close to 880,000 students this school year – a 5,000 student increase from the previous school year. Most of the surge in student enrollment was in Montgomery, Howard, Baltimore, Prince George’s, and Anne Arundel counties. (WaPo, 1/ 20)

 Recommendations to close or consolidate several schools in Prince George’s County have brought members of the community together to oppose the possible changes. (WaPo, 1/17)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Do you want to celebrate the fact that you are already a part of the “IN” crowd and encourage others, too? You’re already a change agent in the region, right? Now let’s celebrate that. In keeping with the theme of WRAG’s 2015 Annual Meeting, “Philanthropy All In,” where we shared the ways we sought to INfluence, INnovate, and INspire in 2015, we’d like to see how you plan to carry on that theme in the new year and beyond. Take a selfie, group photo, or get creative showing off the buttons we gave out at the annual meeting. Be sure to share where you wore it and how others reacted. Tweet us @WRAGtweets and use the hashtag #theINcrowd to join us in celebrating each other’s work! Check out how WRAG’s staff is already getting IN on the action:

Don’t have a button, but want to get INvolved? Ask for one the next time you see a member of WRAG’s staff at a meeting or event!


 

WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Bei Bei recently made his first public appearance. See how much you know about pandas in honor of the occasion.

– Ciara

There is no post racial America. Does philanthropy know?

PHILANTHROPY
As we celebrate the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. this week, it’s easy to think of the country as a dramatically different place than it was in the 1960s. In an op-ed in the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Tamara Lucas Copeland challenges the notion of a postracial America and explains why WRAG is working to foster a better understanding among funders about the dynamics of racism. (Chronicle, 1/21)

[P]hilanthropy’s commitment to aiding the poor continues today, through efforts to improve access to quality education, health care, and housing. Many donors and foundations consider work on such programs vital to attacking the root causes of inequity in America. They believe that if we keep focusing on financing ideas we know work, soon we will reduce the problems for both blacks and whites and eliminate all disparities.

But a growing number of grant makers in Washington have decided it’s important to challenge this notion, to recognize that the distinct, negative treatment of a group of people based solely on race is a major contributor to poverty and inequality in America. We believe that racism is rarely acknowledged or discussed by members of the public or within philanthropy. And we believe that until that silence ends, our region, and our country, won’t be able to take the steps needed to end racial inequities.

To learn more about Putting Racism on the Table, WRAG’s learning series for philanthropic CEOs and trustees, click here.

– The National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP)  is taking nominations for foundations for their 2016 NCRP Impact Awards. You can nominate up to 10 foundations that demonstrate exemplary grantmaking, leadership in funding social change strategies, and commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity.

HEALTH/FOOD | Grantmakers in Health shares policy options and recommendations that recently came out of a meeting of experts, funders, and health practitioners on the ways to support healthier eating policies – particularly around sugar-sweetened beverages that are disproportionately consumed by low-income individuals and ethnic minorities. (GIH, 1/19)

EDUCATION | According to new data, Maryland saw a record high of close to 880,000 students this school year – a 5,000 student increase from the previous school year. Most of the surge has taken place in Montgomery, Howard, Baltimore, Prince George’s and Anne Arundel counties. (WaPo, 1/ 20)

ARTS | With government-commissioned street art being a relatively new thing in the District, Washingtonian offers a glimpse at five D.C. street artists whose work has popped up throughout the area. (Washingtonian, 1/19) Some readers might recognize the work of Kelly Towles, the artist who created the centerpieces for WRAG’s 2011 annual meeting.

TRANSIT/INEQUALITY | Yet More Evidence That Bike-Share Isn’t Reaching the Poor (City Lab, 1/19)


Have you experienced a void in your life ever since the popular television series ‘Friends’ went off the air? Someone developed a computer program that can write new episodes…for better or for worse.

– Ciara