Gentrification in the District is leading to widespread displacement of low-income residents

GENTRIFICATION | According to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School, low-income residents are being pushed out of DC neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country. The newly-released study tracked demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods across the country from 2000 to 2016. (WaPo, 4/26)

“For all the talk of gentrification happening in cities all over the country, what we found is that it really isn’t,” said Myron Orfield, director of the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity … “Washington is one of the few places in the country where real displacement is actually occurring. It’s quite rare.” More than 38 percent of District residents, including about 35 percent of low-income residents, live in census tracts that are growing economically … but low-income people who live in those areas are at the greatest risk of displacement … the study comes as gentrification and its consequences are being discussed with renewed urgency in the nation’s capital.

Related: This study complements the recent National Community Reinvestment Coalition report that found that DC had the “highest intensity” gentrification in the country, with 20,000 African-American residents displaced from their neighborhoods between 2000 and 2013. (WaPo, 3/19)

DISABILITY RIGHTS/PHILANTHROPY | According to a just-released report by the disability-rights group RespectAbility, nonprofits and foundations must do a better job of hiring, accommodating, and including people with disabilities. The report finds that only 24 percent of nonprofits and foundations have at least one board member with a disability. (Chronicle, 4/25 – Subscription)

EDUCATION
Opinion: Public schools in Montgomery County are growing in the amount of students, and they are also growing more segregated by race and class. (GGWash, 4/24)

–  The District leads the region, and nation, in universal preschool enrollment. (WAMU, 4/17)

RACIAL EQUITY | The Arlington County Board has voted to formally request Jefferson Davis Highway be changed to Richmond Highway, which if approved, will be changed in October. (WAMU, 4/26)

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
With new regulations in hand, DC businesses and developers ready to embrace ‘opportunity zones’ (WBJ, 4/24)

How Philanthropy Can Ensure Opportunity Zones Ensure Widespread Economic Renewal (Chronicle, 4/25 – Subscription)

HEALTH
– Some DC Residents Can Exchange Prescriptions for Produce (CP, 4/22)

– The Washington-Baltimore region has just been ranked as the 16th most ozone-polluted city in the US according to the annual State of the Air report, by the American Lung Association. (WTOP, 4/24)

INEQUALITY | A thought-provoking article on inequality and the failures of unrestrained capitalism. (WaPo, 4/20)

COMMUNITY | Bainum Family Foundation Appoints Jacquelyn Davis as New CEO and President

ENVIRONMENT/ART | It’s Not Just Trash, It’s Art: Maryland Park Installation Highlights Pollution Crisis (WAMU, 4/25)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health – New!
Development Operations Manager | World Central Kitchen – New!
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Institutional Writing and Strategy​ | ​League of Conservation Voters Education Fund
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Development Director​ | ​Greater DC Diaper Bank
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Racial Justice Program Officer​ | ​Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Officer​ | ​The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
President and CEO | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Takoma Park’s 100-year history has led to it being called the “Berkeley of the East”

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday!

– Buffy

The number of children in the region in foster care is down

CHILD WELFARE | There are half as many kids in foster care in the Greater Washington region than there were 10 years ago, and child welfare experts believe this is a sign of success for programs working to keep families together. But despite the achievements, there are still challenges. (WAMU, 4/17)

While the numbers of children in foster care in the region has declined since 2008…there’s now a larger percentage of older children in foster care who need placement with families, which this presents a different challenge… Additionally, agencies say they need more parents who are available to foster. The system’s racial makeup is also off balance. In 2017, more than two-thirds of children in foster care in the Washington region were African American, according to the report by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.

RACIAL EQUITY | Two new updates from the Meyer Foundation team: Maryland Program Director Julian Haynes writes about Meyer’s work to address school pushout, and Aisha Alexander-Young, Senior Director for Strategy & Equity, discusses her role at the foundation and how it is driven by a commitment to anti-racism. (Medium, 4/16)

HOUSING
Conflict brewing over HQ2-tied affordable housing money (WBJ, 4/17)

– Notwithstanding the housing crunch, there is a construction freeze in Montgomery County near four schools in an attempt to control class size. (WAMU, 4/16)

Did Silver Spring build enough housing to stay affordable? Sort of. (GGWash, 4/17)

HEALTH/INEQUALITY | What Would a Post-ACA America Look Like? (Truthout, 4/11)

SOCIAL IMPACT | Reimagining the Economy: The Social Justice Enterprise (NPQ, 4/15)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum – New!
Director of Institutional Writing and Strategy​ | ​League of Conservation Voters Education Fund
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Development Director​ | ​Greater DC Diaper Bank
Grants Manager, Data and Reporting​ | ​The Colorado Health Organization
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Racial Justice Program Officer​ | ​Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Officer​ | ​The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
President and CEO | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Did you see the large meteor that exploded in the sky earlier this week?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday next week!

– Buffy

Lack of foster parents in DC puts vulnerable children at risk

CHILDREN/FAMILIES | There is a shortage of foster parents in DC, which child welfare advocates say is putting children at risk of harm. Some children have even had to sleep at the office of DC’s Child and Family Services Agency while they waited to be placed in a home. (WAMU, 4/8)

“We’ve seen cases where kids have been exposed to a lot of violence, have been physically hurt, but have remained in their homes … because there are not enough foster homes right now” … the shortage has been caused in part by increased housing costs, experienced foster parents retiring, and changing demographics in the city. A spokesperson for DC’s Child and Family Service Agency says they are looking to add 40 new beds in the foster care system over this fiscal year … and specifically have a shortage of parents for children with special needs and for older children.

Related: Last year, WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland, urged philanthropy to focus on the child welfare system, a topic that is often invisible to many in our region. (Daily, 9/2018)

ARTS & CULTURE
– DC’s first-ever cultural plan lays out a strategy for growth through investments, infrastructure and programming. The plan was developed by the DC Office of Planning, in consultation with the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment – and includes input from over 1,500 artists, art consumers, and experts from the cultural sector. (WAMU, 4/4)

– The owner of Bethesda’s Union Hardware is promoting a plan to open a collective art studio in downtown Bethesda for up to 30 artists by this summer. (Bethesda Magazine, 4/3)

ECONOMIC INEQUALITY | America’s growing geographic divide derives from economic inequality, especially the tremendous gains of the one percent. (CityLab, 4/3)

EDUCATION
– DC’s Low-Income Neighborhood Schools Are Losing Money. Is The Budget Or Enrollment To Blame? (WAMU, 4/5)

– In Montgomery County, a $5.7 billion budget proposal is being questioned by those who want to see more money focused on education. (WaPo, 4/7)

MARYLAND | Mike Busch, the longest-serving state House speaker in Maryland history who helped shepherd laws that improved access to health care and legalized same-sex marriage, died on April 7 at age 72. (WaPo, 4/7)

VIRGINIA | As Amazon builds and staffs up HQ2, other tech companies who orbit them could follow. (WBJ, 4/4)

FOOD | Hungry, a new Arlington-based healthy food delivery service, has received star-powered support. (WAMU, 4/5)

PHILANTHROPY | The Road Ahead: Will Philanthropic Critique Change Philanthropic Practice? (NPQ, 4/4)


How would you improve the Metro map when it’s reprinted?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

New data show increasing economic disparities, displacement in DC

INEQUALITY | The median income in DC overall has increased since the recession, but the poverty rate has increased in wards 7 and 8, according to a DC Fiscal Policy Institute analysis of recently released census data. In addition, the number of African-American residents living west of the Anacostia River has declined since 2007. (City Paper, 9/29)

According to the advocacy organization, 21,000 fewer black residents live west of the Anacostia River than before the recession, resulting in a decline from 42 percent of west-of-the-river population in 2007 to 33 percent last year. Meanwhile, more than 90 percent of residents living east of the Anacostia are black, composing almost half of the District’s total black population (47 percent).

Additionally, the poverty rate east of the river increased from 27 percent before the recession to 33 percent in 2015. It ticked down a percentage point west of the river, to 12 percent, over the same period. The proportion of the city’s residents who live below the federal poverty line jumped from 40 percent in 2007 to 47 percent last year.

Here’s more on DCFPI’s analysis and recommendations.

– A new report from American University finds that, across the region, people living in the most racially and ethnically diverse neighborhoods think that their neighborhoods are better than other areas. However, even in diverse neighborhoods, black and Latino residents reported different perceptions of police and safety. (WaPo 10/3)

Related: WRAG Members: Derek Hyra, director of the Metropolitan Policy Center at AU, which conducted this study, is the business meeting speaker at WRAG’s 2016 Annual Meeting. His talk will focus on how we can better ensure that the benefits of economic development and growth happening across the region accrue to all residents. Learn more here.

– PolicyLink has a nice write-up (featuring the Northern Virginia Health Foundation president and CEO and WRAG Board member Patricia Mathews) about how Fairfax County came to pass the One Fairfax resolution, which commits the county to advancing racial and social equity. (PolicyLink, 9/29)

HOUSING
– In their latest in a series of issue briefs, HAND looks at the housing choices of millennials and their impact on the Greater Washington region. (HAND, 9/27)

Affordable Housing Advocacy and the National Elections (NPQ, 10/3)

Developer-In-Chief: Obama Wants D.C. (And Other Cities) To Build More Housing (WAMU, 9/29)

JUSTICE | D.C.’s Broken Parole System (City Paper, 9/30)

FOOD/HEALTH | FDA Is Redefining The Term ‘Healthy’ On Food Labels (NPR, 10/3)


How did I go for so long without knowing about pangolins?!

– Rebekah

Recovery and revitalization misses some areas of the region

REGION/HOUSING
In their series on housing in America last week, The Washington Post shared how residents in the Greater Washington region were affected by the area’s housing bubble, subsequent dive into the Great Recession, and population shift toward inner-Washington neighborhoods after the recession. (WaPo, 5/6)

Few places in the region burned hotter during the real estate boom than Loudoun County. As closer-in suburbs grew more built-out and expensive, Loudoun became the next frontier for home builders, a place to parcel farms into subdivisions featuring enormous single-family homes.

[…]

When the downturn came, the new homes were derided as McMansions — temples to American excess. Homeowners found that not only could they not pay the mortgage but they also couldn’t afford to heat or cool their manses.

OpinionA financing model for affordable and supportive housing in D.C. (WaPo, 5/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | WRAG has unveiled a new Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, in partnership with Booz Allen Hamilton, designed to “pull the curtain back on philanthropy,” and shed light on how grantmakers think, approach their work, and what they look for in nonprofit partners. Participants can join in-person or via live webcast. Click here to learn more and to register!

EDUCATION/DISTRICT
– The NewSchools Venture Fund has announced the launch of a new independent nonprofit spin-off organization beginning on July 1 called Education Forward DC.

– The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has released a report examining the fairness of the District’s Empowering Boys and Men of Color initiative. According to the ACLU and some D.C. officials, the city should work to “provide equivalent opportunities for our girls.” (WCP, 5/9)

WORKFORCE/INEQUALITYThe Racial Divide in the Creative Economy (City Lab, 5/9)


At this point, whether you’re a Broadway fan or not, you’ve at least heard of ‘Hamilton.’ Now, you don’t have to trek to New York City to see it.

– Ciara

Foundations should improve transparency, survey says

PHILANTHROPY
A new study by the Center for Effective Philanthropy analyzing survey data from 145 foundation CEOs and more than 15,000 grantees on the transparency of foundations reveals that most believe that grantmakers could become more effective and credible if they were more open to the public about their failures and shortcomings. A shortage of staff and resources to focus on such efforts were cited as deterrents to full transparency. (Chronicle, 2/23) Subscription required

Ninety-four percent of the foundation leaders surveyed said transparency is important. However, three-fourths say their organizations are not open enough. Even though 61 percent of the leaders say being more candid about how they assess their own performance would help them become more effective, only 35 percent say they share their self-assessments.

The level of openness online was even skimpier. Just 5 percent of foundation websites contained information on unsuccessful projects. However, the researchers found no correlation between information provided on a foundation website and a grantee’s perception of a grant maker’s openness.

The full report from CEP is available here.

– Independent Sector, a coalition of charities and foundations, has named a new chief executive. Dan Cardinali, head of Communities in Schools, will take over in July for Diana Aviv, who left the organization to head Feeding America. (Chronicle, 2/23) Subscription required

COMMUNITY | The 15th annual Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation Awards, honoring the best in public service, are coming up! Five winners will be honored with a cash prize and, this year, a group will be honored with a new Team Innovation award. Click here to view the eligibility requirements and awards criteria. The application deadline is March 31.

DISTRICT/WORKFORCE | Abstract abilities and skills are the best predictors of high wages in the District (District, Measured, 2/23)

HOMELESSNESS
– The Quiet Revolution in Homeless Policy (HuffPo, 2/22)

– In light of Black History Month, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty elevates the issue of the deep connections between race and homelessness.

EDUCATION/POVERTY | More and more college campuses across the U.S. have been seeing students protest in the name of gender and racial inequality. Now, a greater number of schools are seeing students ban together and organize in protest of socioeconomic inequality at their institutions. (Atlantic, 2/24)


The streets of Staten Island just got a little bit…greedier.

– Ciara

Reported HIV cases decrease for seventh year in a row

HIV/AIDS
According to a new report released by the D.C. Department of Health, the number of reported annual new HIV cases is down for the seventh consecutive year. (DCist, 2/2)

The report shows preliminary data for 2014, which includes 396 new HIV cases – a 29 percent decrease from the 553 cases reported in 2013. The highest number of HIV cases was reported in 2007 with 1,333 cases. Since then, numbers are down by 70 percent.

Executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, Channing Wickham, had this to say of the news:

I’m very pleased to see the hard work of the nonprofit community, the D.C. Department of Health, and the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA) reflected in the latest data for new HIV cases.  At the same time, it’s imperative to remember the thousands of District residents who are living with HIV and the need to continue and expand HIV prevention efforts.

REGION/ECONOMY | A new study by the Brookings Institution ranks the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area against 99 other metro regions in the U.S. in terms of recovery from the Great Recession. The study rates the D.C. area’s performance as: 71st in “growth;” 91st in “prosperity;” 72nd in “inclusion;” and 77th in “inclusion by race.” (DCist, 2/2)

HOUSING/DISTRICT | Some 7,300 households rely on public housing in the District. With a number of public housing properties slated for overdue rehabilitation or replacement, DC Fiscal Policy Institute shares some of the risks this could cause for families who may be displaced, and offers recommendations for their protection. (DCFPI, 1/27)

WORKFORCE/SOCIAL PROFITS | Hiring Keeps Rising at Nonprofits in N.Y and D.C., Study Says (Chronicle, 2/2)  Subscription required

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– The District and the D.C. Public Library have announced a new program, Books from Birth, that will send enrolled children a book every month until the age of five. The program is a partnership between the city and the Dollywood Foundation. (WCP, 2/2)

How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality (Atlantic, 1/28)

ARTS/RACIAL EQUITY | Opinion: A writer shares his experiences witnessing slotting, tokenism, and dehumanization in the nonprofit theater sector. (NPQ, 1/29)

POVERTY | OpinionWhat Data Can Do To Fight Poverty (NYT, 1/29)


The Washingtonian presents a guide to successfully living in Washington, D.C.

– Ciara