DC Mayor Bowser sets a goal of building 36,000 new housing units by 2025

HOUSING
– At the start of her second term in office, DC’s Mayor Muriel Bowser wants to increase the production of new housing in order to meet the pressing need for housing affordability in the District. (WAMU, 1/8)

“Bowser has even set a goal for D.C.: 36,000 new housing units by 2025, the city’s portion of the estimated 235,000 housing units the Washington region will have to produce in that period to keep up with job growth. Currently, the region is expected to produce 170,000 housing units over the next six years. Housing analysts say the mayor’s goal is enthusiastic, though achievable.”

WRAG’s Vice President, Gretchen Greiner-Lott, had this to say regarding the Mayor’s announcement:

“Housing affordability is an ever-growing issue throughout our region so it is exciting to see Mayor Bowser acknowledge the issue and pledge to make it her number one priority. As she says, we all have to “think big and differently” about how to produce more housing. The Housing Leaders Group of Greater Washington’s Guidebook for Increasing Housing Affordability in the Greater Washington Region would be a great place to start.”

Alexandria lost 90% of its affordable homes in the past few decades. Is it really ‘radical’ to build more? (GGWash, 1/8)

ENVIRONMENT | In a new report, scientists say the health of the Chesapeake Bay deteriorated in 2018 after years of improvement. (WaPo, 1/8)

EQUITY/DISABILITY RIGHTS | Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi, head of RespectAbility and the Mizrahi Family Charitable Trust, is powerfully pushing for philanthropy to focus on equality for people with disabilities. (Chronicle, 1/8)

EDUCATION | Schools tackle anxiety over food and fees as shutdown shows no sign of ending (WaPo, 1/8)

TRANSPORTATION | Lyft is offering low-cost rides to grocery stores in Wards 7 and 8. What’s a sustainable solution? (GGW, 1/7)

COMMUNITY | We were saddened to learn last month of the passing of Vicki Sant, a longtime philanthropic leader in the Greater Washington region, and the founder, along with her husband Roger Sant, of the Summit Foundation, as well as the Summit Fund. A memorial service will be held on January 16 at the Kennedy Center. Details can be found here.

NONPROFITS | The application for the 2019-2020 Catalogue for Philanthropy is now open. Click here for details.


We are on day 19 of the government shutdown – from museum visits to tours, here’s some things you can still do.

– Buffy

How will DC pay for its Birth-to-Three For All DC bill?

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | The DC Council unanimously approved the Birth-to-Three For All DC Act, which will increase investments in health services provided to infants and toddlers, and increase subsidies for early childhood learning to expand access and to increase the wages of low-paid workers. Now the city has to figure out how to fund it. (DCist, 11/19)

This all comes at a steep price: an estimated $500 million over the next decade. So far, just $1.3 million has been earmarked for the Birth-to-Three Act in the 2019 budget, financed by a tobacco tax increase last spring.

This month 18 local organizations—banding together under the umbrella of the “Birth to Three Policy Alliance”—sent a letter to the mayor, requesting she invest $30 million in her next budget for the legislation ($22 million to raise the wages of educators, $6 million to expand home visiting, and $2 million to expand healthcare supports).

HOUSING
– Here’s what DC offered Amazon to locate its second headquarters here. The incentives include DC committing to double its spending on affordable housing through the Housing Production Trust Fund to $200 million a year. (WAMU, 11/19)

– This is how the residents of a historically Black section of Exmore, Virginia created a nonprofit and installed their own indoor plumbing in 1999 after city officials ignored them for years. (YES! Magazine, 11/19)

TRANSGENDER RIGHTS | Today is Transgender Day of Remembrance. The Human Rights Campaign Foundation has released A National Epidemic: Fatal Anti-Transgender Violence in America in 2018, a report honoring the known transgender people killed in 2018. (HRC, 11/19)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | Anacostia-based Theater Alliance has named Raymond O. Caldwell as its new artistic director. (WaPo, 11/19)

WORKFORCE | How the economy is impacting the lives of women, especially those who are pregnant or women of color. (Truthout, 11/11)

IMMIGRATION | A federal judge has temporarily blocked the administration from denying asylum to migrants who cross the southern border into the United States. (WaPo, 11/20)


The Daily will be back next Monday!

Here’s a guide to talking with relatives and others you don’t exactly agree with during the holidays.

– Kendra

DC paid family leave bill may become law

WORKFORCE | Although Mayor Muriel Bowser’s deadline to veto the paid family leave bill that DC Council passed in December is today, she has not signed the bill. Instead, she has sent a letter to the Council expressing her concerns about the burden on businesses. Without her veto, the bill will become a law and DC will have paid leave starting in 2020. (WAMU, 2/15)

Bowser faced three choices when she received the bill earlier this month: Sign it, return it to the Council unsigned, or veto it, which would have required nine votes on the Council to override her. By not signing the bill, she played a balancing act, expressing her concerns with the measure while not forcing legislators to revisit the issue. In December, the Council approved the bill on a 9-4 vote.

But in her letter she did offer the Council an olive branch of sorts, saying her administration would “look to our partners on the Council to provide ways to overcome the very significant deficiencies” with the bill. She also warned that the Council would have to “fund and refine the legislation before any significant outlays of resources can be made.”

IMMIGRATION
– Nicky Goren, Meyer Foundation‘s President and CEO, shares her family history of immigration and reflects on the silver linings she’s seen as more people get involved in the fight for social justice. (Meyer Foundation Blog, 2/14)

– Yanique Redwood, Consumer Health Foundation‘s President and CEO, explains why CHF is closing its doors to stand in solidarity with immigrants on ‘A Day Without Immigrants’. (CHF Blog, 2/16)

EDUCATION
– DC has added pathway coordinators to its high schools to help students at risk of dropping out succeed in school. (Atlantic, 2/14)

– A new legislative analysis found that universal pre-kindergarten would cost Montgomery County up to $128 million annually. (Bethesda Beat, 2/15)

ENVIRONMENT
– Alexandria is considering methods to stop its sewage from flowing into local waterways, including the Potomac River (GGW, 2/9)

– Environmentalists Oppose Dominion Power’s Plan To Bury Coal Ash Near Potomac River (WAMU, 2/14)

INFRASTRUCTURE | Report tallies up in 1,200 deficient bridges across Md., Va., DC (WTOP, 2/15)


Bao Bao is leaving us!

– Kendra

Six policy recommendations to preserve affordable housing in the District

HOUSING
D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s “Housing Preservation Strike Force” has released six new recommendations for preserving affordable housing units in the city to keep them accessible for lower-income residents (WCP, 6/13):

According to the mayor’s office, the strike force’s six recommendations are:

  • Establishing a preservation unit within a D.C. agency to identify specific affordable-housing opportunities, and to create a database of affordable-housing units
  • Funding a “public-private preservation fund” to “facilitate early investments in preservation deals”
  • Launching a program to renovate affordable housing in “small properties” of between five and 50 units
  • Drafting additional regulations for the District Opportunity to Purchase Act, which allows D.C. to purchase properties that risk losing their affordable-housing subsidies
  • Incentivizing residents and developers to take advantage of the Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act through “predevelopment activities, legal services, third-party reports, acquisition bridge financing,” and data-collection
  • Creating programs designed to benefit seniors, such as “tenant-based vouchers or other rental assistance”

– The D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development has launched a new pilot program to preserve affordable housing in ward 8, as neighborhoods east-of-the river expect economic development over the next several years. (WCP, 6/10)

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE | While the Putting Racism on the Table learning series has drawn to a close, the lessons learned will linger on in the minds of the attendees. In this blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland asks Julie Wagner of CareFirst and Terri Copeland of PNC to share their deepest insights and major takeaways from the full series. (Daily, 6/13)

EQUITY
– DC Fiscal Policy Institute discusses the importance of approving the Improving Access to Identity Documents Act that would allow District residents with incomes below 200 percent of poverty to obtain birth certificates, driver’s licenses, or ID cards at no charge. (DCFPI, 6/10)

– The Hell of Applying for Government Benefits (Atlantic, 6/12)

LGBT/DISCRIMINATION | In light of Sunday morning’s mass shooting in Orlando, The Atlantic takes a look at how, despite the advances in LGBT rights throughout the years, many still find themselves subject to violence at alarming rates. (Atlantic, 6/13)

PHILANTHROPY 
– Nonprofit Quarterly presents a two-part series authored by president of the F.B. Heron Foundation, Clara Miller, in which she discusses how they’ve worked to build a foundation that continues to evolve and engage with the larger economy. Check out part 1 and part 2. (NPQ, 6/8 and 6/9)

– Funding Infrastructure: A Smart Investment for All (SSIR, 6/10)

ECONOMYWhich U.S. Cities Suffer the Most During a Recession? (City Lab, 6/9)


Tonight is Game 5 of the NBA Finals. Which team are you rooting for? Can it be the Cavs? Please!?

– Ciara

Report explores growth in women’s giving

The Daily will return on Tuesday, May 31. Enjoy the long weekend.

WOMEN/EQUITY
A new report by the Women’s Philanthropy Institute (WPI) explores the growth in women’s giving, along with trends in the demographics and motivations of those who give. (Inside Philanthropy, 5/24)

WPI has released a study showing for the first time that women are motivated by personal experience to give to causes that benefit women and girls specifically.

Sounds like a no-brainer, right? Well, it’s actually significant, useful information. Women’s tendency to donate money to specific causes based on experiences like having a child or discrimination suggests that philanthropy might take off in new directions as women become primary asset-holders in society and further increase their giving.

Inside Philanthropy recently highlighted the tremendous work and evolution of the Washington Area Women’s Foundation as they strive to improve the lives of women and girls in the Washington region. (Inside Philanthropy, 4/28)

– Report: The Tipped-Minimum Wage Leaves D.C. Women Behind (WCP, 5/24)

RACIAL EQUITY/YOUTH | In a follow up to their cover story investigating the views of American teenagers fifty years ago, Newsweek is back with another extensive look at the major social concerns of U.S. teens in 2016. According to their survey, “the most compelling findings show that race and discrimination are crucial issues for teens today.” (Newsweek, 5/2016)

HEALTHWhere Is All the Autism Funding? (Atlantic, 5/26)

TRANSIT | A major lack of investment in infrastructure is apparent in many ways lately – particularly in relation to aging public transit systems. Areas of the northeast continue to struggle with finding the resources to keep this vital component of many people’s lives efficient and safe. (NYT, 5/2016)

ARTS/EDUCATION | A growing number of educators in the District are looking toward integrating more of an arts focus in lessons in an effort to close the ongoing achievement gap among public schools. (USA Today, 5/25)

POVERTYHidden Camera Reveals How Little People Really Know About Poverty (HuffPo, 5/24)


Let’s say you really want to go to a museum, but you really don’t have the time to do that. Just look at these things and walk past everything else.

– Ciara

Nationally, rates of disconnected youth vary widely

ECONOMY/WORKFORCE
A new Brookings Institution analysis examines data on unemployment among teens and young adults across the U.S. Many of America’s youth remain “disconnected” – not working and not in school. (Brookings, 5/24)

Nationally, an estimated 3 million young people aged 16–24 (7.6 percent) are disconnected. The majority of these young people are between 20 and 24 years old, suggesting that the problem becomes more acute after young people are of an age to have graduated high school. They are disproportionately people of color. Rates of disconnection vary widely by metropolitan area, and in some places, young blacks and Latinos are up to 3-to-6 times more likely to be disconnected than young whites.

[…]

Some of the metro areas with the highest employment rates among prime-age adults did not have particularly high rates among teens and young adults, including Washington, D.C.; Hartford, Conn.; Raleigh, N.C.; Albany, N.Y.; and Austin, Tex. These places all have relatively highly educated populations, and the disproportionately high employment rate among adults aged 25–54 relative to younger workers probably reflects that these metros import workers from other places.

– With an estimated two-thirds of all venture capital money finding its way into just six major U.S. metro areas, according to a new study, are America’s rural towns and smaller areas being completely left behind in the economy – further contributing to the problems of income and geographic inequality? (City Lab, 5/24 and WaPo, 5/23)

– America’s Road to Economic Opportunity Is Paved With Infrastructure Jobs (City Lab, 5/18)

WRAG/SOCIAL PROFITS | Booz Allen Hamilton‘s Laura Dempsey and WRAG’s Katy Moore share how the upcoming Nonprofit Summer Learning Series came to be, and why those looking to build solid relationships with the local funding community should sign up to attend. (Daily, 5/24)

PUBLIC HEALTH | Brian Castrucci, Chief Program and Strategy Officer of the de Beaumont Foundation, discusses the importance of holistic approaches and multisectoral collaboration in effectively facing complicated health challenges. (HuffPo, 5/18)

HOMELESSNESS/DISTRICT | DC Fiscal Policy Institute looks into the progress the District has made in lowering the numbers of homeless families, while examining the work that still lies ahead. (DCFPI, 5/24)

PHILANTHROPYAfrican American museum’s fundraising touches deep history among donors (WaPo, 5/24)

POVERTY | A small new study takes the research behind the ways in which one’s neighborhood can shape their level of future economic mobility a step even further and finds links between one’s city block and successful outcomes. (Atlantic, 5/23)

CSR | The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation is accepting nominations for their 17th annual Corporate Citizenship Awards, recognizing the most accomplished social and community initiatives within the business community.

HOUSINGWashington’s Supply of Entry-Level Homes Is Shrinking (Washingtonian, 5/24)


Here’s one way to deal with train delays.

– Ciara

New report on investing in the good food system

FOOD
Arabella Advisors has released a new report, “Investing to Strengthen the Good Food Supply Chain,” and accompanying graphic, “On the Road to Good Food,” identifying areas where they believe capital investments can yield powerful investment returns and significant impact in expanding access to good food.

Developing the infrastructure to supply good food will require more than philanthropy alone can deliver. Most of the solutions we need must come from private-sector commitments—specifically, from investments in companies across the food supply chain that can bring more sustainable, healthy, and affordable food to market

CSR | The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.

HEALTHGrantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, recently released a supplement on health equity innovations, published in the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016

EDUCATION/INFRASTRUCTURE | A new report looks at the conditions of school buildings across the country, and finds that many are in dire need of maintenance to the tune of an estimated $112 billion to ensure they are safe spaces in good condition. (WaPo, 3/22)

DISTRICT/WORKFORCE | D.C. mayor calls for raising minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020 (WaPo, 3/22)

ARTS
– A new interactive exhibit, “In it Together: Service Members, Community and Dialogue Through Art” at the Lorton Workhouse Arts Center, showcases artwork from service members and veterans. (Inside NOVA, 3/22)

–  D.C. Artists Protest Washington Post No-TYA-Review Policy (AT, 3/22)

– Have you been wondering what happened to those plastic white balls from last year’s “The Beach” exhibit at the National Building Museum? Look no further than the forthcoming Dupont Underground. (WaPo, 3/22)


Sometimes, this is what happens when you ask the Internet to name things.

– Ciara