Study finds community banks discriminate against communities of color

EQUITY | A new study released yesterday found that community banks are just as likely as traditional banking institutes to discriminate against communities of color, especially when looking at the fees associated with opening, maintaining, and closing checking accounts. (Citylab, 6/21)

For example, the study finds that overdraft fees are higher in banks located in predominantly Black and Latinx neighborhoods when compared with the overdraft fees assessed in white communities. Not only that, but banks in Black and Latinx neighborhoods are more likely to use credit-screening agencies for opening accounts than they are in white neighborhoods.

Other findings from the report:

Banks in predominantly African-American neighborhoods require higher opening deposit charges for starting a basic checking account.

EDUCATION | The Office of the State Superintendent of Education has discovered that about 1,000 teachers in DC Public Schools lack certification the city requires to teach. (WaPo, 6/21)

YOUTH | Eshauna Smith, CEO of Urban Alliance, has announced that Nathaniel Cole will step down as the DC executive director after eight years and Monique Rizer will step into this role. (Urban Alliance, 6/21)

LOUDOUN | Phyllis Randall, corporate vice president of Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments and Board Chair of Loudoun County Board of Supervisors, was selected to the Women in Government Leadership Program hosted by Governing Magazine. (Loudoun Tribune, 6/19)

AGINGBill before D.C. Council would block assisted living facilities from taking new dementia patients (WaPo, 6/21)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Development Manager | Young Playwrights’ Theater– New!
Senior Research Analyst | Job Opportunities Task Force
Sr. Social Innovation Specialist | Washington Gas
Director, Corporate and Foundation Relations | Wolf Trap Foundation
Foundation Coordinator | The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation
Senior Manger of Policy | United Philanthropy Forum
Grants Associate | Democracy Fund
Contract Grant Writer | Project HEAL
Program Associate| Case Foundation
Grants Manager | Public Welfare Foundation
Program Manager | The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation
Grants Program Analyst | Legal Services Corporation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Would you drive this tiny car?

– Kendra

Efforts to shed light on housing affordability in the region and beyond

HOUSING
Over the past six months, Leadership Greater Washington, in partnership with WRAG, has hosted a thought-leadership series on housing affordability. Last week’s session on regional solutions featured the Roadmap for Our Region’s Economic Future, the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group, and WRAG’s Our Region, Your Investment initiative – all efforts in which WRAG is very involved. The Washington Post published a story on the importance of housing affordability to our region and focused specifically on the work of the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group. (WaPo, 5/28)

[…] a group of local leaders representing government, business and the philanthropic sector is studying whether to propose a “regional compact” in which the Washington area as a whole would commit to addressing runaway housing costs.

If nothing is done, they warn, the problem of overpriced housing will fester until it eventually explodes into a widely recognized crisis — much as the Metro transit system’s problems were ignored for years until they recently triggered a burst of attention.

Gretchen Greiner-Lott, who leads these efforts for WRAG, had this to say of the coverage:

Solving big issues takes collaboration. The Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group is just that – a regional, cross-sector collaboration of committed folks working on the issue. I am so pleased to see our work highlighted in the media.

– A new report released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, along with an interactive website supported by JPMorgan Chase, provide a close look at the disparity between rental housing costs and renter income in every jurisdiction in the U.S. In order to be able to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment in D.C., one would need to earn $31.21 an hour; $26.53 an hour in Maryland; and $22.44 an hour in Virginia. (NLIHC, 5/25)

– A new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities examines a decline in federal support for housing aid for families with children. Despite the damaging effects of the Great Recession to many families with children, the share of federal housing assistance that went to those families declined over the last several years. (City Lab, 5/26)

COMMUNITY 
– The Council on Foundations recently named Floyd Mills as its Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. This role is a new position “intended to advance the Council’s work to promote inclusiveness as a fundamental operating principal in philanthropic organizations.” (COF, 5/23)

– Trustee, member of the board of directors, and Veterans Liaison for the PwC Charitable Foundation, Frank Guadio, recently sat with The Huffington Post to discuss best practices for collaboration on issues related to veterans. (HuffPo, 5/25)

REGION
– An annual ranking by the Trust for the Public Land places D.C. at number three and Arlington at number four on its list of the best U.S. cities for parks. Factors to determine the ranking included: accessibility; amenities; size; and the amount of money spent per resident on parks. (WaPo, 5/26)

– Loudoun County Reportedly the “Happiest” County in America (Washingtonian, 5/31)


A new art exhibit appeals to the procrastinator and/or perfectionist in all of us. 

– Ciara

Homelessness rises unevenly across the region

HOMELESSNESS/REGION
The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments recently shared the results of the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness. Overall in the region, the homeless population rose by five percent from 2015 to 2016, though not spread evenly across the area. The report urges more aggressive action to bring affordable housing to families in Greater Washington. (WAMU, 5/11)

According to the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness […] there were 12,215 people who were homeless across the nine local jurisdictions that participate in the yearly census, which took place on Jan. 28.

That’s up from the 11,623 homeless people in the region at the same time last year.

[…]

In D.C., the number of homeless people increased by 14 percent, while it went up by 12 percent in Frederick County. Things went in the opposite direction for the rest of the region, though. In Arlington County, Loudoun County and the City of Alexandria, the number of homeless people decreased by 27, 20 and 16 percent, respectively.

The full report can be accessed here.

– The number of homeless families in D.C. has risen by more than 30 percent in comparison with a year ago. Further, the District’s homeless children and their parents outnumbered homeless single adults for the first time since the annual census began in 2001. (WaPo, 5/11)

RACISM/COMMUNITY
–  In a letter to the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy, WRAG president Tamara Copeland calls on organizations to talk about racism, and reflects on how the topic of diversity is sometimes used to deflect deeper conversations about race and racism in society. (Chronicle, 5/12).

– In his most recent blog post adapted from a panel presentation at last week’s GEO conference, Rick Moyers, vice president for programs and communications at the Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, summarizes Meyer’s experience with the 28 organizations they’ve supported in implementing the Benevon Model for increasing individual giving. His take away? “I wish we’d known at the outset that the goal was to change organizational culture.” (Meyer, 5/11)

Related: Rick is the first speaker in WRAG’s Nonprofit Summer Learning Series. Catch him on June 23 addressing The Dos & Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers!

ECONOMY/REGION | Region’s innovation economy needs boost or risks being ‘laggards’ (WBJ, 5/12)

MARYLAND | Study: Gaithersburg Is The Most Diverse City In America (DCist, 5/11)

HEALTH | A new study finds a 44 percent increase in hospitalizations for ischemic (the most common type) strokes among people ages 25 to 44, despite a 20 percent overall drop among all Americans. (WaPo, 5/11)


Conference calls, you’re the worst! Well…maybe not the worst, but honestly, does anyone actually enjoy them?

– Ciara

Recovery and revitalization misses some areas of the region

REGION/HOUSING
In their series on housing in America last week, The Washington Post shared how residents in the Greater Washington region were affected by the area’s housing bubble, subsequent dive into the Great Recession, and population shift toward inner-Washington neighborhoods after the recession. (WaPo, 5/6)

Few places in the region burned hotter during the real estate boom than Loudoun County. As closer-in suburbs grew more built-out and expensive, Loudoun became the next frontier for home builders, a place to parcel farms into subdivisions featuring enormous single-family homes.

[…]

When the downturn came, the new homes were derided as McMansions — temples to American excess. Homeowners found that not only could they not pay the mortgage but they also couldn’t afford to heat or cool their manses.

OpinionA financing model for affordable and supportive housing in D.C. (WaPo, 5/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | WRAG has unveiled a new Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, in partnership with Booz Allen Hamilton, designed to “pull the curtain back on philanthropy,” and shed light on how grantmakers think, approach their work, and what they look for in nonprofit partners. Participants can join in-person or via live webcast. Click here to learn more and to register!

EDUCATION/DISTRICT
– The NewSchools Venture Fund has announced the launch of a new independent nonprofit spin-off organization beginning on July 1 called Education Forward DC.

– The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has released a report examining the fairness of the District’s Empowering Boys and Men of Color initiative. According to the ACLU and some D.C. officials, the city should work to “provide equivalent opportunities for our girls.” (WCP, 5/9)

WORKFORCE/INEQUALITYThe Racial Divide in the Creative Economy (City Lab, 5/9)


At this point, whether you’re a Broadway fan or not, you’ve at least heard of ‘Hamilton.’ Now, you don’t have to trek to New York City to see it.

– Ciara

The everlasting effects of housing discrimination

RACIAL EQUITY 
Historically, racial covenants were put in place to prevent people of color from buying homes in certain neighborhoods, and D.C. was no exception. Restrictions like these from the past still work against many Americans today. (GGW, 5/5)

While this legal tactic is long gone, its effects remain. […] young black people are far less likely than their white and Hispanic peers to get help from their parents to afford the down payment on a home. Each generation invests in real estate and gains wealth in doing so, which it then uses to help the next generation – except if, a few generations ago, residents and the government stopped your ancestors from getting some wealth in the first place.

– How videos of police shooting unarmed black men changes those who watch them (WaPo, 5/8)

YOUTH/DISTRICT | DCAYA Senior Policy Analyst Joseph Gavrilovich examines a possible path forward for afterschool and summer youth programming in D.C. in advance of the shuttering of the DC Trust. (DCFPI, 5/9)

ARTS | The D.C. Office of Planning recently announced a public art initiative called Crossing the StreetBuilding DC’s Inclusive Future through Creative Placemaking, that will place 15 pop-up art projects throughout each of the District’s eight wards. (DCist, 5/5)

REGION
AudioHow Residents Feel About The Urbanization Of Maryland Suburbs (WAMU, 5/9)

– At a recent economic development summit in Loudoun County, officials shared the ways in which they envision creating a more diverse economy with “endless possibilities.” (Loudoun Times, 5/5)

MENTAL HEALTHLoudoun libraries host programs on mental health awareness (Loudoun Times, 5/7)

ENVIRONMENT/POVERTY | In light of New York City’s recent adoption of a five-cent bag fee, here’s a look at how D.C.’s own fee for shopping bags has worked for low-income residents and the environment. (City Lab, 5/5)

CSR | Audio: Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, along with Charles Schwab Foundation President Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz, discuss how their companies choose the causes they support. (Chronicle, 5/6)

COMMUNITY | A new project by the Walker’s Legacy Foundation (WLF), with funding support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, aims to address the challenges that low-income, single-parent, and working-mother led households often face in pursuing entrepreneurship through the development of a financial literacy app, cohort structures, mentorship, and programming. WLF is a project of WRAG’s fiscal sponsorship service.

Related: WRAG offers fiscal sponsorship as a valuable, cost-effective service to organizations and projects that could use back-office support, are looking for human resources, financial, or administrative help, or need 501(c)(3) status. Learn more here.


Are you working on learning a second (or third, or fourth) language? A lot of people are. Here are the languages everyone else is trying to learn.

– Ciara

A look at America’s housing divide

HOUSING
A new analysis by The Washington Post examines America’s housing recovery and finds that it has been greatly uneven, creating deep disparities based on factors like income, geography, and race. The analysis also hones in on four cities: Stockton, California, Atlanta, Georgia; Charlotte, North Carolina; and Washington, D.C. (WaPo, 4/28):

In the heart of the District, where home values are up more than 90 percent, a modest rowhouse in gentrifying Trinidad is now worth about as much as a newer, spacious suburban home in Loudoun County, where values have barely budged. Around Washington, the housing market’s winners and losers are divided by the Beltway. Inner-ring suburbs have outperformed outer-ring ones. That gives the best returns to short-commute neighborhoods once avoided for their schools, crime and poverty.

– According to data, D.C. and its surrounding suburbs have one of the widest housing affordability gaps in the country. (WaPo, 4/28)

Washington City Paper takes a look at a handful of the thousands of low-rent units in the District that have been very poorly maintained by their landlords. (WCP, 4/29)

– Report: Low-Income Residents Moving Out of Silver Spring at Highest Rate in the Country (Bethesda, 4/29)

OpinionThe Racist Roots of a Way to Sell Homes (NYT, 4/29)

CSR | Congratulations to WRAG members BB&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, Deloitte, JPMorgan Chase, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and Wells Fargo for being nominees for the 2016 Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards by the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce. Check out what they were nominated for here. (NVCC, 4/29)

VIRGINIAWhat’s Missing From Loudoun County? (BisNow, 4/26)

WORKFORCE/EQUITYIf There’s Only One Woman in Your Candidate Pool, There’s Statistically No Chance She’ll Be Hired (HBR, 4/28)


Sometimes, it’s okay to brag, right? Here’s how to be the best at tooting your own horn.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – March 28 through April 1, 2016

THIS WEEK IN HOUSING
– This week, NPR plunged into issues surrounding affordable housing (or lack thereof), in cities like Washington, D.C., with stories about tenants facing eviction and facing off in court with their landlords, and low-income renters in the District struggling to get by. NPR‘s local housing stories from this week can be found here, here, here, and here.

Finding an affordable anchor in D.C.’s wave of gentrification (WaPo, 3/29)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– The Loudoun County School Board compromised on a controversial proposal that would have concentrated mostly low-income, Hispanic students into two schools, reminding many of separate-but-equal policies of the past. (Loudoun Times,  3/29)

– A new study was released, examining how race plays a role in influencing a teacher’s expectations for their students’ potential for academic success. (WaPo, 3/31)

THIS WEEK IN SOCIAL PROFITS
Audio: CECP Chief Executive Officer Daryl Brewster shares advice on ways the social profit sector and corporations can partner more effectively and offers his vision for the future of corporate social responsibility. (Chronicle, 3/25)

– 7 Pitfalls to Avoid When Building a Diverse Nonprofit Staff (Chronicle, 3/30) Subscription required


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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It’s April Fool’s Day, so here’s your guide for navigating the next several hours.

– Ciara