First citywide program for connecting black women with HIV prevention drugs coming to DC

HIV/AIDS 
A $1 million investment from the MAC AIDS Fund will go toward making D.C. the first major city to get a program that will connect black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) in the District with pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. (Slate, 6/17)

In 2009, D.C. declared an HIV epidemic that rivaled those in many African nations, with around 3 percent of the city’s residents living with HIV. In some areas and age groups, it was closer to 5 percent. Though targeted prevention efforts have cut D.C.’s new-diagnosis rate by almost 60 percent since then, the city still has an HIV rate nearly twice as high as the state with the next highest rate, Louisiana, and nearly 4 percent of black residents are infected. In D.C. and across the country, HIV is a racialized epidemic among women: As of 2012, 92 percent of D.C. women living with HIV were black.

Channing Wickham, executive director of Washington AIDS Partnership, which is at the forefront of these efforts, had this to say:

The Washington AIDS Partnership is excited to be at the center of Washington, D.C.’s goal to “end HIV” through the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan, and innovative HIV prevention strategies such as  Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for women. Stay tuned for a major announcement with more details on June 30!

RACISM/INEQUALITY | Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shares with WRAG this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning, and the enduring impact and significance of the political cartoonist in society. Check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

REGION | Leaders of Washington’s former bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics are said to be keeping up the momentum of their efforts by continuing to meet to discuss objectives for further regional cooperation, even without the possibility of the summer games. (WBJ, 6/17)

DISTRICT
Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to newly-released federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

– A report by the District’s Office of Revenue Analysis examines the gender pay gap among the city’s workforce. While men make more than women for the same work in most industries, D.C.’s nonprofit sector is shown to be one area where women often make more than men in similar positions. (WBJ, 6/17)

–  This Is The Insane Amount of Money it Takes To Be Considered “Wealthy” in DC (Washingtonian, 6/17)

EDUCATION
Montgomery County schools have adopted a new budget officials hope will narrow the school system’s achievement gap and lower class sizes. (WaPo, 6/17)

– Data show that more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)

HEALTH/YOUTH
– According to estimates, there are still 37 million homes in the U.S. that contain lead-based paint and 6 million that recieve drinking water through lead pipes. With children shown to absorb more lead than adults, the American Academy of Pediatrics is urging physicians to be more proactive about testing children for exposure. (NPR, 6/20)

Video: Can the U.S. End Teen Pregnancy? (Atlantic, 6/14)


Just in case you haven’t heard, Clevelanders are very, very happy today.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – March 21 through March 25, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Reflections on implicit bias were shared by Board Chair Missy Young and lead staffer Dara Johnson from the Horning Family Fund. (Daily 3/24)

– The Consumer Health Foundation‘s Kendra Allen interviewed Sequnely Gray, Community Engagement Coordinator for So Others Might Eat and a TANF recipient, about her experience advocating for families on TANF and the impact of benefit time limits. (CHF, 3/21)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/REGION
– A new report found significant racial disparities in the acceptance rates among selective academic programs at public schools in Montgomery County. (WaPo, 3/22)

 In Loudoun County, a proposal that would concentrate mostly low-income, majority Hispanic students into two schools is evoking memories of “separate but equal” policies of the past. (WaPo, 3/20) 

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
–  Grantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, released a supplement on health equity innovations, published with the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016)

–  OpinionThe color of heroin addiction — why war then, treatment now? (WaPo, 3/23)

THIS WEEK IN CSR
 The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Are you #TeamPancakes or #TeamWaffles? Personally, I found both to be far too filling.

– Ciara

The Community Foundation in Montgomery County appoints Anna Hargrave as new Executive Director

COMMUNITY 
The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region (CFNCR) has appointed Anna Hargrave as the new Executive Director of the Montgomery County office. Hargrave has served at The Community Foundation for nine years in many roles. Bruce McNamer, president and CEO of CFNCR said of the appointment:

“Anna is a strong, effective, and generous leader. She has the perfect combination of on-the-ground experience and strategic vision that we need to support and grow our work in Montgomery County. I join the Board and my colleagues in congratulating her on this appointment and look forward to working with her in this new capacity.”

FOOD ACCESS
A new study published by the American Journal of Public Health finds that, despite the presence of ‘big-box retailers’ who have begun selling fresh produce in areas considered food deserts, many American shoppers still opt for junk food options. The question of whether it’s the type of store or consumer preference that leads to unhealthy choices remains unanswered for researchers. (NPR, 10/14)

CHILDREN/EDUCATION | Hispanic student enrollment has surged in the Montgomery County school system, with Latino children now making up 30 to 32 percent of those in kindergarten through 4th grade. Youth advocates call for the county, and other areas seeing demographic changes, to go beyond programming in order to appropriately cater to students. (WaPo, 10/14)

HOUSING | In D.C., officials looking to reduce the number of vacant homes across the city are often met with challenges like legal loopholes. (WAMU, 10/9)

HOMELESSNESS | Debate On Replacing D.C. Shelter Finds That Bathrooms Are a Crucial Question (WAMU, 10/14)

HEALTH
–  A writer explores what the District’s proposed 16-week paid leave policy could mean for transgender patients pursuing transitional surgeries. (Blade, 10/9)

– A recent study finds that medical costs in D.C. are relatively affordable in comparison with other major U.S. cities despite the true costs of care varying widely within the city. (WBJ, 10/12)

Why 80 Percent of Addicts Can’t Get Treatment (Atlantic, 10/13)

ECONOMY | The states where people have the best and worst financial habits (WaPo, 10/13)


This week in new studies that will probably be debunked again by next week: this and this

– Ciara

New study a ‘wake up call’ for funders of black and Latino arts groups

ARTS
The University of Maryland’s DeVos Institute of Arts Management has released a new national study on funding for African American and Latino arts groups. The report, with its controversial findings, may serve as a ‘wake up call’ to some arts funders (LA Times, 10/12):

Sending “a wake-up call” to arts donors, a new national study paints a bleak economic picture of African American and Latino nonprofit museums and performing arts companies and suggests that donors may have to let weaker organizations wither so that the strongest ones can grow.

Funders may need to support “a limited number of organizations,” says the report by the University of Maryland’s DeVos Institute of Arts Management, “with larger grants to a smaller cohort that can manage themselves effectively, make the best art, and have the biggest impact on their communities.”

– Take a glimpse at the highly anticipated expansion of the Town Hall Education Arts Recreation Center – also known as THEARC – scheduled to break ground later this month. Big plans are in place for the facility. (WBJ, 10/6)

Arlington County proposes speeding up its exit from the Artisphere (WBJ, 10/12)

PHILANTHROPY
–  CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield has announced that it will award $3 million to social profit organizations and government organizations in the region to develop new, innovative telemedicine programs that improve access to healthcare. (WBJ, 10/12)

– Grantmakers for Effective Organizations has released a new publication, The Source Codes of Foundation Culture, a resource exploring the organizational culture of foundations and what it takes to modify the values and practices deeply ingrained in their work. (GEO, 10/8)

– The Foley Hoag Foundation is now accepting applications from qualified social profit organizations located in Washington, D.C. through an invitation-only process. The foundation seeks help in identifying those organizations who may be a good fit. Guidelines focus on eliminating inequality in all forms and on small grassroots organizations. You can find more information on the guidelines  here.

EDUCATION
– A study commissioned by the Montgomery County Board of Education examines how the county’s school system has served students with specials needs and their parents. According to the report, further staff training, more psychologists, and greater efforts to educate parents on complex processes will be necessary to bring the high-performing schools to where they need to be. (WaPo, 10/9)

– In the District, a growing number of parents are opting out of traditional schooling in favor of home-schooling, with the number of registered home-schooling families up by a third over the past two years. (WaPo, 10/10)

A Discouraging Portrait of America’s Urban Public Schools (City Lab, 10/9)

SOCIAL INNOVATION | Read how financial institution Goldman Sachs saw success while dabbling in social impact bonds with an investment in 100 Utah preschoolers. (NYT, 10/7)


All aboard!

– Ciara 

Mixed feelings about major complex coming to Ward 8

DISTRICT
Following the announcement of a new sports and entertainment complex on the St. Elizabeths East campus, some residents are expressing mixed feelings about the proposed venue. (WaPo, 9/24)

[…] in interviews with dozens of residents of this Ward 8 neighborhood, where unemployment is far higher than the national average of 5.5 percent, people were as likely to express optimism about the project’s impact on their community as they were to suggest that the city should instead be investing its money in affordable housing and better schools for their kids.

EDUCATION/REGION
– A new report examining resources and staffing at high poverty schools looks at Montgomery County schools’ spending and suggests that much more aid should be put toward helping low-income students to close the ever-widening achievement gap in the school system. (WaPo, 9/23)

–  For many students in the region, learning to ride a bike has much more meaning than simply mastering the art of balancing without training wheels. It can also be an essential lifelong skill that gives students of various income levels an equitable educational experience, while also highlighting the need for greater cycling infrastructure throughout the District and its suburbs. (WaPo, 9/23)

HEALTH | Obesity Maps Put Racial Differences on Stark Display (NPR, 9/23)

JOBS | Host Hotels & Resorts, Inc. currently has an opening in their chairman’s office for a Foundation Assistant who will primarily support the Marriott Daughters Foundation, and periodically support the Richard E. & Nancy P. Marriott and the Nancy Peery Marriott Foundations. Click here to find out more.


How well do you know science (or remember it from high school)? Take this quiz to see how you stack up.

– Ciara