Decriminalizing sex work in the District

PUBLIC HEALTH/CRIMINAL JUSTICE | A coalition of sex workers and their advocates have introduced a bill, the Community Safety and Health Amendment Act of 2019, to decriminalize the sale and purchase of sex in the District. (CP, 6/3)

The world of people who sell sex for money in DC is not a monolith with one blanket policy need … among their ranks are those who sell sex by choice; those who sell sex to survive, feed their children, and stave off homelessness; and those who sell sex against their will because they’ve been trafficked. Under the current law in DC, police can arrest and charge anyone who sells sex and under this new bill, police would no longer have cause or power to employ this tactic for catching sellers of sex mid-sale—a change that many sex workers and their advocates enthusiastically endorse.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | Minneapolis ended exclusive single-family zoning. Could the DC region do the same? (WBJ, 6/6)

LGBTQIA | DC’s LGTBQIA communities continue to fight for some basic rights—and celebrate their victories, too. (CP, 6/6)

ENVIRONMENT
Key Urban Agriculture Programs Delayed as City Swaps Who Will Manage Them (CP, 6/7)

– Michael Bloomberg’s foundation said that he will donate $500 million to a new campaign to close every coal-fired power plant in the United States and halt the growth of natural gas. (NYT, 6/6)

MARYLAND | Residents voice concerns over Montgomery County policing (WTOP, 6/7)

DC/CULTURE | The DC Public Library is launching a three-part Go-Go Book Club, in collaboration with Washington Performing Arts and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. (dcist, 6/6)

TRANSIT/CLIMATE | Maryland and Virginia plan to expand roads, in defiance of their own climate goals (GGWash, 6/6)

GENTRIFICATION | What’s In A Name? Residents East Of The Anacostia River Say, ‘Everything.’  (WAMU, 6/7)

PHILANTHROPY
– A new report,  Nonprofit Executives and the Racial Leadership Gap, details that people of color who lead nonprofits face barriers and challenges that their white counterparts don’t. (Chronicle, 6/4)

– Fund the People has launched the Talent Justice Initiative to help funders and nonprofits invest in intersectional racial equity across the nonprofit career lifecycle and workforce.

– Has the Giving Pledge Changed Giving? (Chronicle, 6/4)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore – New!
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation – New!
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation – New!
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Blueberries all day, every day

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday!

– Buffy

Landmark education bill will reshape Maryland’s public school system

EDUCATION | A landmark education bill designed to reshape Maryland’s public school system will become law without Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature, and will send an additional $855 million to schools over the next two years. (WaPo, 5/15)

Over the next two years, the funding will pay for school-based health centers, grants for schools where at least 80 percent of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, raises for teachers — the state will provide a 1.5 percent raise if the local district gives 3 percent — and grants to improve teacher standards.

The Maryland Commission on Innovation and Excellence, also known as the Kirwan Commission, was asked in 2016 to devise a plan to create a world-class school system in Maryland and ensure that all students, regardless of race and ethnicity, are “college- and career-ready” by 10th grade. The Kirwan Commission also was charged with coming up with funding formulas to pay for the plan, but the panel released its recommendations this year without a breakdown of how the state and local governments would share the costs.

IMMIGRATION | Between 75 and 150 adult adoptees in the District and up to 1,700 Virginians are at risk of being deported. (WAMU, 5/15)

RACIAL EQUITY/HEALTH
– An emergency Task Force on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health has been created by the Congressional Black Caucus to address access to mental health care and suicide among Black youth, including those who are LGBTQIA. (Washington Blade, 5/7)

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises (NPR, 5/8)

CENSUS | Mayor Bowser officially kicked off the District’s 2020 Census efforts by presenting a proclamation to honor the selection of her Complete Count Committee.

CHILDREN/SAFETY | A Centers for Disease Control study has found that 1 in 14 public and charter high school students in DC has exchanged sex for something of value. Students who had been kicked out of their homes, run away or been abandoned were most likely to have exchanged sex.  (WAMU, 5/16)

HEALTHCARE | How safe are Greater Washington’s hospitals? Some earn top grades for quality and safety, and others don’t score as well. (WBJ, 5/16)

ARTS | Mayor Muriel Bowser Wants Big Changes for the City’s Arts Commission (CP, 5/16)

WOMEN/EQUALITY | June 4 marks the 100-year anniversary of Congress’ passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, and there are a number of places around the Greater Washington region to learn the history of women’s suffrage. (WAMU, 5/16)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors – New!
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table – New!
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners – New!
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Communications, Technology, and Administration | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Architecture is like a tree … it grows and matures and branches out. I am part of that tree, of that movement, not starting, or ending, or following anything.” I.M. Pei has died at 102.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

Students march to fight gun violence

GUN VIOLENCE | Student protesters at a rally yesterday called for passage of federal legislation requiring universal background checks for firearm sales. The demonstration came a year to the day after thousands of students in region participated in a national walkout to protest gun violence, moved to action following the mass shooting in Parkland, FL. (WaPo, 3/14)

Hundreds of high school students, family members and people touched by gun violence marched Thursday to the US Capitol demanding universal background checks for firearm sales that awaits a vote in the Senate, following House approval. “We are here today because we have to be, because we have been failed by every institution that didn’t protect us,” Dani Miller, co-president of the Maryland group MoCo Students for Change, told the crowd. Miller’s group organized Thursday’s demonstration. “Our friends are dying, so we march,” Miller said.

– Last night 49 people were killed in a terrorist attack at several mosques in New Zealand. The horrific events in New Zealand underscore the urgency of activism and action against gun violence. (WaPo, 3/14)

PUBLIC HEALTH
– A new study finds that communities of color disproportionately bear the health burden of air pollution. Black and Hispanic communities on average experience 56 and 63%, respectively, more air pollution than they create, while white people experience 17% less air pollution than they produce. (NPR, 3/11)

– The District will finally have a maternal mortality review committee, joining nearly 30 other jurisdictions in the United States. (City Paper, 3/30)

WORKFORCE | A  $15 minimum wage bill has been approved by Maryland Senate. (WAMU, 3/14)

DISTRICT | DC will be able to maintain its own parks, thanks to a federal partnership. (Curbed, 3/12)

HOUSING
– Housing advocates say homeowners and tenants are likely to see increased home values and rising rents soon, because of HQ2 and because Greater Washington has long suffered from a lack of affordable housing. (WBJ, 3/13)

– Arlington County Board will vote on a $23 million incentive package for Amazon this weekend despite critics working to delay the vote. (dcist, 3/13)

– DC’s affordable housing funds aren’t going as far as they were just a few years ago. Higher construction costs have significantly increased what it takes to create affordable housing in DC. (Curbed, 3/11)

RACE | Stanford researchers found that black and LatinX drivers were stopped more often than white drivers, based on less evidence of wrongdoing. (NBC News, 3/13)

EDUCATION
– Several schools in Fairfax County are regularly isolating children. (WAMU, 3/13)

– Regional lawmakers want to allow schools to start before Labor Day. (WAMU, 3/13)

PHILANTHROPY
Funders Propose a Philanthropic “Green New Deal” (NPQ, 3/12)

– Grant Makers Urged to Rethink How They Are Organized and How They Operate (Chronicle, 3/12)

NONPROFITS | UMD’s Do Good Institute (WRAG’s partner on the Philanthropy Fellows program) is offering a series of free webinars on nonprofit management, fundraising, and  finance. Sign up here – here


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation – New!
Grants Management Associate | Wellspring Philanthropic Fund – New!
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Want to avoid the flu? The trick is in the hand washing.​

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday and Friday next week!

– Buffy

The federal government shutdown cost to the District of $47 million will affect upcoming DC budget talks

SHUTDOWN/DISTRICT | According to a recent quarterly revenue estimate prepared by the DC Chief Financial Officer, the 35-day federal government shutdown cost the District $47.4 million worth of revenue, challenging city officials as they prepare for upcoming 2020 budget talks on spending priorities and programs. (WAMU, 3/1)

Advocacy groups and Council members have been lobbying Mayor Bowser on how best to allocate spending in the upcoming budget – including increasing taxes on businesses and high-income residents to pay for affordable housing, homeless services, schools, and health programs. In a statement on the revenue estimate, Bowser called the shutdown “historic and unnecessary” but said it served as “a reminder of why we continue the work of diversifying our economy and making our city an attractive place to do business.”

RACISM
The ‘heartbreaking’ decrease in black homeownership – racism and rollbacks in government policies are taking their toll. (WaPo, 2/28)

Former DC Mayor Sharon Pratt Launches Discussion Series With Panel on Blackface (City Paper, 2/27)

PUBLIC HEALTH
– DC Mayor Bowser released an extensive plan over two months ago to cut opioid overdose deaths in half by late 2020, but key programs in the plan haven’t yet been started. (WaPo, 3/3)

Conditions In The DC Jail Are Unsafe And Unsanitary, DC Auditor Says (dcist, 3/1)

HOUSING | The most cost-effective way to help the homeless is to give them homes (Vox, 2/20)

TRANSIT
– The most expensive commutes in the US  are in Charles County in southern Maryland. Residents there spent about two and a half weeks on average traveling to and from work in 2017, and workers in Fauquier and Stafford Counties in Virginia didn’t fare much better. (Bloomberg, 2/28)

– The Montgomery County Council hopes to expand the “kids ride free” Ride On bus program to weekends to accommodate students. (Bethesda Magazine, 2/28)

LGBTQIA+ 
– A kindergarten class in Arlington, VA held a celebration of transgender students during last week’s Read Across America Day. (WaPo, 3/3)

– ‘A Step Backwards For Our Denomination’: D.C. Methodists Grieve Vote To Exclude LGBTQ Clergy And Marriages (dcist, 3/1)

PHILANTHROPY | A recent survey by Grantmakers for Education found that three-quarters of foundations said their grants go toward helping low-income people, LGBTQ students, immigrants and refugees, women and girls, and people with disabilities. (Chronicle, 2/28 – Subscription)


Groovy – in the ’60s and ’70s, West Hyattsville, MD was a hotbed for psychedelic, trippy music.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

Does your zip code determine how long you will live? WRAG and COG join forces to explore

By Jennifer Schitter
Principal Health Planner
Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments

What does housing, economy, education, transportation, public safety, environment, and land use have in common? They all have an impact on our health.

Inequalities in community health by location reflect the interplay of social, economic, and environmental factors that differentiate the quality and duration of life for residents from one Metro stop to another.

The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG) Region Forward Committee is partnering with the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers (WRAG) and its Healthy Communities Working Group (HCWG) to use a cross-sector approach to illuminate such disparities at the neighborhood level (Region Forward Sectors below). Once uncovered, both targeted policy and resource decisions by community stakeholders can have an impact on the lives of our communities. This collective approach to incorporate health considerations into decision-making is commonly referred to as Health in All Policies (HiAP).

In June, local health officials and health funders from across the region joined together to discuss the HiAP opportunities and challenges seen within their own efforts. A few of the comments are listed below:

 HiAP Opportunities:

“It offers the opportunity for people outside of the public health field to share a common objective and interest in health and well-being.”

“An equitable society where all citizens have an opportunity to reach their full potential.”

  HiAP Challenges:

 “Implementing HiAP often involves gaining buy-in and support from other sectors and definitely involves a multi-sector effort, all of which take time and rarely is there funding to do so.”

 “Probably the biggest barrier is the name itself – those outside of the health space are too easily confused. Too often they think HiAP is about clinical care because of the name – and reactions like ‘why should we care about healthcare in transportation polices’ become the norm.”

By COG and WRAG partnering to break down barriers by using cross-sector data, it will show just how where we live impacts the lives we live. This will ultimately assist policy makers in deciding where to invest their time, money, and resources for the greatest community benefit. Although there are some challenges, health officials, funders, and elected officials are optimistic in making health a priority across the metropolitan Washington region.

New report closely examines racial and ethnic incarceration disparities in each state

MASS INCARCERATION/RACISM
A new report examines the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics state-by-state, finds three contributing factors to the racial and ethnic disparities in those rates, and makes some recommendations for reform. (Sentencing Project, 6/14)

Truly meaningful reforms to the criminal justice system cannot be accomplished without acknowledgement of racial and ethnic disparities in the prison system, and focused attention on reduction of disparities. Since the majority of people in prison are sentenced at the state level rather than the federal level, it is critical to understand the variation in racial and ethnic composition across states, and the policies and the day-to-day practices that contribute to this variance. Incarceration creates a host of collateral consequences that include restricted employment prospects, housing instability, family disruption, stigma, and disenfranchisement.

Related: In the most recently released video of WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, James Bell, J.D., founder and executive director of the W. Haywood Burns Institute, discussed mass incarceration and how structural racism, white privilege, and implicit bias collide within the criminal justice system.

OUR REGION, YOUR INVESTMENT | Our Region, Your Investment is gaining traction with local investors, with a recent $500,000 investment from the Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation. Says Joshua Bernstein, president of the foundation (Daily, 6/16):

The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation is working to address the deficit in housing affordability in the D.C. area. An investment in the Enterprise Community Impact Note aligns our investment strategy with our mission and leverages our impact.  We are grateful for the opportunity that Our Region, Your Investment has created to invest funds in ways that promote additional investment in housing solutions.

COMMUNITY/LGBT/PHILANTHROPY | Following the recent tragedy in Orlando, a number of WRAG members have organized efforts to provide support to victims and their families or share valuable resources with those serving LGBT communities. Wells Fargo has announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation. The Council on Foundations has shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for the victims, and the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.

EDUCATION/DISCRIMINATION/VIRGINIA | Students at Alexandria’s public schools are bringing to light what they describe as “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. Today, The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the research that supports their argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

Related: On Thursday, July 7, the third installment of WRAG’s Public Education Speaker Series (supported by The Omega Foundation and the Tiger Woods Foundation) tackles the topic of racial and gender disparities in school discipline, with Professor Anne Gregory of Rutgers University. WRAG members can click here to register.

ARTS/CULTURE African American Museum prepares for ‘a mini-inauguration’ (WaPo, 6/15)

PUBLIC HEALTHGun Violence ‘A Public Health Crisis,’ American Medical Association Says (NPR, 6/14)


Going back to school is tough at any age, but imagine going back to the 10th grade at age 68! This grandfather shows us it’s never too late.

– Ciara