Survey looks at perceptions of public safety in the District

DISTRICT 
A newly-released survey of District residents aims to provide a baseline idea of perceptions of public safety throughout the city and encourage greater collaboration with neighborhood police. The report (by the Community Preservation and Development Corporation (CPDC), the Council for Court Excellence, and the Local Initiatives Support Corporation) finds that residents in Ward 8 feel the least safe compared to residents in other areas of the city. (PR Web, 6/28)

District of Columbia residents who live in Ward 8 feel the least safe of any in the city, are more likely to have observed or experienced a violent crime, and are least likely to trust police than others who live here.

[…]

The survey findings come amid heightened concern about rising rates of homicides in major cities nationally. While data from the DC Metropolitan Police Department show that property crime is down and violent crime is level in the District as compared to a year ago, there has been a troubling spike in homicides. According to a recent report for the Department, between 2014 and 2015, there was a 54% increase in the number of homicides across DC with the increase mostly concentrated in the Northeast and Southeast quadrants. Between January and May of 2016, the number of homicides in Ward 7 tripled from the rate during the same period a year ago.

The full report, Perceptions of Public Safety, can be found here.

HEALTH/COMMUNITY | Jennifer Schitter, principal health planner at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, shares the partnership between their Region Forward Committee and WRAG’s Healthy Communities Working Group on a collective, cross-sector approach to shed light on how social, economic, and environmental factors influence health at the zip code level. (Daily, 6/28)

Related: The Healthy Communities Working Group has also just released their Theory of Change, illustrating a vision toward a better region “where communities across all jurisdictions are thriving, and all people are living their lives to their fullest potential.”

PHILANTHROPY | On Exponent Philanthropy‘s blog, Katherine B. Wright, executive director of the Wright Family Foundation, shares how her family’s organization stepped into the policy arena and witnessed the power of the collective voice of philanthropy. (Philanthrofiles, 6/24)

AGING
– According to a Freddie Mac survey of the housing plans and perceptions of people born before 1961, over five million in this age group anticipate moving to rental units by 2020, further placing pressure on low-income rental inventories. (Freddie Mac, 6/28)

– So you’re thinking about retirement? Find out which areas in the region were recently named among the best cities to do so. (ARLNow, 6/27)

– Nonprofit Work After Retirement? Maybe You Can Make It Pay (NYT, 6/24)


It is with a mix of sadness and excitement that I must share that today will be my last day at WRAG and writing The Daily WRAG :(  Rebekah Seder will be taking over once again – on a modified schedule – as I will be making my transition to another organization in the WRAG family. Sincere thanks to anyone who has ever responded to any of the weird things that I’ve posted down here, or has sent a kind note to let us know they are reading. I will certainly miss my colleagues I’ve had the great privilege of working with over the past couple years and am so happy to say that I won’t be going far. 

– Ciara

Annie E. Casey Foundation releases 2016 KIDS COUNT Data Book

YOUTH
The Annie E. Casey Foundation has released their 2016 KIDS COUNT Data Book, looking at children’s well-being across various indicators nationally and within each state. For youth in the District, the data show some gains and some losses (WCP, 6/21):

The analysis presents a mixed-bag for District youth, who have seen significantly higher rates of reading and math proficiency from 2007 to 2015 as well as a slight uptick in health-insurance enrollments from 2008 to 2014. Still, the portion of those living in poverty—26 percent, as of two years ago—remained the same as it was in 2008, with one in ten teens (roughly 3,000) neither in school nor working in 2014.

In the report‘s overall state rankings, Virginia comes in at number 11 and Maryland lands at number 16.

OpinionWhat does it mean when five D.C. kids are shot and there’s no outcry? (WaPo, 6/21)

– According to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it costs a middle-income family (with two parents and no more than five children) $245,340 to raise a child born in 2013 in America from birth to 18-years-old. While 2013 is the most recent year for which data is available, you can use the interactive tool to see how those numbers have changed for low-, middle-, and high-income families since 1960. (WSJ, 6/22)

SOCIAL PROFITS/PHILANTHROPY | In the newest video in their Philanthropy Lessons video series, Exponent Philanthropy staff and grantees discuss the value of the all-important site visit. (Chronicle, 6/22)

IMMIGRATION/VIRGINIACounty Board Backs Resolution for Undocumented Immigrant Driver’s Licenses (ARLnow, 6/22)

CSR/COMMUNITY | The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation has extended the deadline for the 17th annual Corporate Citizenship Awards submissions to June 30.  The 2016 winners will be announced at the Citizens Awards Gala on November 17 at the end of their annual conference.

EDUCATION 
– A new University of Virginia study asks the question, “Is Kindergarten the New First Grade?” and offers the first national glimpse at how expectations of the youngest students have changed quite a bit since 1998. (NPR, 6/21)

– Can ‘early warning systems’ keep children from dropping out of school? (WaPo, 6/21)


If you were in Reston yesterday, you saw nearly every type of weather there is. 

– Ciara

New report examines Northern Virginia’s disparities in life expectancies

VIRGINIA/HEALTH
A new report from the Northern Virginia Health Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health looks at the disparities in life expectancy among Northern Virginia’s richest and poorest residents. While the area often tops rankings for happiness, health, etc, many residents are falling behind based on factors like education, income, and race. (WaPo, 6/7)

In Fairfax County alone, life expectancy ranges by as much as 10 years between western Lorton and eastern Lorton census tracts separated by four miles. In western Lorton, where the median household income is $133,413 and 12 percent of the population is black, the life expectancy is 89. In eastern Lorton, where the median income is $77,901 and 37 percent of residents are black, life expectancy drops to 79, according to the report.

[…]

“It’s about city planning, zoning and transportation issues,” said Patricia Mathews, the president of the health foundation.

Read the full report, A Study in Contrasts: Why Life Expectancy Varies in Northern Virginia.

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND shines a spotlight on the Roadmap for the Region’s Future Economy and efforts toward regional collaboration on affordable housing. (Helping Hands Blog, 6/6)

EDUCATION
– The U.S. Education Department has released the latest data from the Civil Rights Data Collection survey covering the 2013-2014 school year for more than 95,000 public schools. Check here for a quick glance at the numbers. (NPR, 6/7)

Related:  This data reveals deep racial inequities in the education system, including in how discipline is administered (for instance, that black preschoolers are 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white preschoolers). Education funders are invited to join us for the next session in our Public Education Speaker Series on July 7, which will focus specifically on racial and gender disparities in school discipline and strategies for addressing them. More information can be found here.

Opinion: Two experts discuss how constant stress placed on children in poverty can take a toll on their mental and physical health, creating a need for better collaboration between schools and health providers. (WaPo, 6/6)

–  Homework Inequality: The Value of Having a Parent Around After School (Atlantic, 6/6)

WORKFORCE/LGBT | With more than 90 percent of transgender people experiencing some form of harassment in the workplace, the D.C. Office of Human Rights and the National LGBTQ Task Force have created a first-of-its-kind guide for employers for making work environments more accommodating. (WCP, 6/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | The Center for Nonprofit Advancement is accepting nominations for the Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman 2016 EXCEL Award until Friday, July 15, at 5:00 pm. The award recognizes outstanding leadership among Washington-area social profit organization chief executives.


Quiz time! How much do  you know about Africa?

– Ciara

Do More 24 in full swing!

COMMUNITY/REGION 
Today marks the United Way of the National Capital Area‘s annual Do More 24 event – a 24-hour online giving campaign that kicked off at midnight and will end at 11:59 pm. Local, regional, and national social profit organizations with a presence in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area are participating in the focused day of giving to create maximum impact as a community. The award winners will be announced tomorrow. Click here to remain up-to-date on the total raised – and to give!

CSR
– The Chronicle of Philanthropy presents a special report and interactive database on giving from America’s biggest companies. Bank of America, Citi, Capital OneJPMorgan Chase, PNC, and Wells Fargo are among the companies highlighted for their corporate giving and social good efforts. (Chronicle, 6/1) Subscription required

– Socially Responsible Companies Are Big Draw for Workers, Study Says (Chronicle, 6/1) Subscription required

PHILANTHROPY
Exponent Philanthropy has launched a new blog series in honor of their 20th anniversary that will focus on reflections of founders, early board members, and others with extensive careers in the field of philanthropy. In this blog post, Exponent Philanthropy founding member, former board chair, and executive director of The Americana Foundation Marty Fluharty discusses why it is so imperative for foundations to break down silos. (PhilanthroFiles, 6/2)

– Demanding That Nonprofits Not Pay For Overhead Is Preventing Them From Doing Good (Co.Exist, 6/1)

DISTRICT
– The D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development has announced the launch of a new initiative, the “June Housing Bloom,” aimed at increasing the number of affordable housing units in the city (WCP, 6/1):

The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) is […] putting out solicitations for the development of 25 District-owned properties in Wards 4, 5, 7, and 8 to get the month-long initiative started. The offerings are part of a five-pronged strategy to reduce neighborhood blight, according to DHCD: producing affordable housing, preserving affordable housing, boosting homeownership, ending homelessness, and making use of currently vacant properties. DHCD will hold an informational meeting about the sites at its HQ on June 22, with a proposal deadline of Sept. 1.

– In Search of TANF Reform (CHF, 5/27)

VIRGINIA | VideoWhy Virginia’s Restoration of Voting Rights Matters (Atlantic, 5/31)

MENTAL HEALTH/IMPLICIT BIAS | For many people of color struggling with their mental health and seeking the aid of psychotherapy, roadblocks to access can often prevent them from getting much-needed help. A new study suggests that implicit bias on the part of psychologists’ offices may be the main barrier to some people receiving proper mental healthcare. (Atlantic, 6/1)


Do you have any strange reading habits? You are not alone in the Greater Washington region.

– Ciara

Nationally, rates of disconnected youth vary widely

ECONOMY/WORKFORCE
A new Brookings Institution analysis examines data on unemployment among teens and young adults across the U.S. Many of America’s youth remain “disconnected” – not working and not in school. (Brookings, 5/24)

Nationally, an estimated 3 million young people aged 16–24 (7.6 percent) are disconnected. The majority of these young people are between 20 and 24 years old, suggesting that the problem becomes more acute after young people are of an age to have graduated high school. They are disproportionately people of color. Rates of disconnection vary widely by metropolitan area, and in some places, young blacks and Latinos are up to 3-to-6 times more likely to be disconnected than young whites.

[…]

Some of the metro areas with the highest employment rates among prime-age adults did not have particularly high rates among teens and young adults, including Washington, D.C.; Hartford, Conn.; Raleigh, N.C.; Albany, N.Y.; and Austin, Tex. These places all have relatively highly educated populations, and the disproportionately high employment rate among adults aged 25–54 relative to younger workers probably reflects that these metros import workers from other places.

– With an estimated two-thirds of all venture capital money finding its way into just six major U.S. metro areas, according to a new study, are America’s rural towns and smaller areas being completely left behind in the economy – further contributing to the problems of income and geographic inequality? (City Lab, 5/24 and WaPo, 5/23)

– America’s Road to Economic Opportunity Is Paved With Infrastructure Jobs (City Lab, 5/18)

WRAG/SOCIAL PROFITS | Booz Allen Hamilton‘s Laura Dempsey and WRAG’s Katy Moore share how the upcoming Nonprofit Summer Learning Series came to be, and why those looking to build solid relationships with the local funding community should sign up to attend. (Daily, 5/24)

PUBLIC HEALTH | Brian Castrucci, Chief Program and Strategy Officer of the de Beaumont Foundation, discusses the importance of holistic approaches and multisectoral collaboration in effectively facing complicated health challenges. (HuffPo, 5/18)

HOMELESSNESS/DISTRICT | DC Fiscal Policy Institute looks into the progress the District has made in lowering the numbers of homeless families, while examining the work that still lies ahead. (DCFPI, 5/24)

PHILANTHROPYAfrican American museum’s fundraising touches deep history among donors (WaPo, 5/24)

POVERTY | A small new study takes the research behind the ways in which one’s neighborhood can shape their level of future economic mobility a step even further and finds links between one’s city block and successful outcomes. (Atlantic, 5/23)

CSR | The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation is accepting nominations for their 17th annual Corporate Citizenship Awards, recognizing the most accomplished social and community initiatives within the business community.

HOUSINGWashington’s Supply of Entry-Level Homes Is Shrinking (Washingtonian, 5/24)


Here’s one way to deal with train delays.

– Ciara

New partnership offers low-cost, high-impact learning opportunities for local nonprofit community

by Laura Dempsey, Lead Associate of Community Partnerships, Booz Allen Hamilton and Katy Moore, Managing Director of Corporate Strategy, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers and Booz Allen Hamilton are excited to announce a new partnership designed to leverage local philanthropic expertise to help build the capacity of the Greater Washington region’s nonprofit community: the Nonprofit Summer Learning Series.

Since 2007 Booz Allen has sponsored high-quality learning opportunities for nonprofit organizations to gain critical insights from leading nonprofit development officers, foundations, and corporate grantmakers. The Nonprofit Speaker Series was created to help nonprofit executive directors, development directors, staff, and board members build their capacity and learn best practices. On average, over 350 nonprofits per year have participated in the series.

Last year, WRAG launched its highly anticipated “Fundamentals of CSR” workshop, designed to help local nonprofits ‘crack the code’ to better understand local corporate funders. Since then, WRAG has seen an increase in demand from local nonprofits looking to connect with the area’s top experts in grantmaking.

From these two successful programs, the new Nonprofit Summer Learning Series was born. Designed and taught by some of the Greater Washington region’s most respected grantmaking professionals, this low-cost learning series “pulls the curtain back on philanthropy.” WRAG and Booz Allen invite Daily WRAG readers to join us as we shed light on how grantmakers think, how they approach their work, what they look for in strong nonprofit partners, and how you can build new and stronger relationships with the local funding community. Click the links below for details on speakers, locations, fees, and registration.

June 10 | The Dos & Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers
Even if your organization has successfully received grant funding for years, do you truly understand the ins-and-outs of working with grantmakers? Do you know and understand recent trends and shifts in philanthropy? Do you know how funders like to be approached? How they make decisions? How they’re organized and staffed? Do you know how to cultivate not only relationships but true partnerships with your funders? Join us to hear from four leading grantmaking professionals in our region as they offer practical advice and insights on these topics and more.

July 14 | Navigating the Grants Process: From initial contact to long-term partnership
You’ve identified a potential funder, made contact, applied for and received a grant, sent the acknowledgement letter… But that’s just the beginning! Join us to hear from four of our region’s top grantmaking professionals as they offer practical advice and insights on navigating the grants process from getting your foot in the door all the way to long-term partnership.

August 19 | Having Tough Conversations with Your Funder
Have you ever needed to have a difficult conversation with a funder? Topics might include financial sustainability or fundraising challenges, leadership transitions or staff turnover, or not being able to achieve key objectives set forth in your grant agreement. A nonprofit leader’s ability to successfully navigate these challenging discussions can be key to building trust and deepening relationships with your funders. Join us to hear from three pairs of funder/nonprofit partners as they discuss some difficult conversations they’ve had over the years and how they came through the other side.

Friday roundup – May 16 through May 20, 2016

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY
– Consumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar shared her reflections on the Putting Racism on the Table series and how it has had a meaningful impact on her life in this blog post available in both English and Spanish. (Daily, 5/19)

– Caitlyn Duffy, project associate for Philamplify at the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, discussed why she’s challenging philanthropy and other sectoral organizations to talk more explicitly about structural racism, and gave a shout out to WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series. (NCRP, 5/18)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– In light of the coming dissolution of the DC Trust, WRAG submitted a letter on behalf of the region’s philanthropic community to D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson, calling on the Council to maintain funding for out-of-school and summer programming for D.C.’s  children and youth in the FY17 budget.

Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers‘ president and CEO David Biemesderfer shared this open letter to foundations he signed as one of 22 nonprofit and philanthropy leaders, thanking foundations that have invested in nonprofit infrastructure. He also provided some examples of the important work Forum members Indiana Philanthropy Alliance, Maine Philanthropy Center, and WRAG are doing to strengthen communities nationwide. (Forum, 5/17)

THIS WEEK IN TRANSIT
– Metro Releases Finalized Long-Term Maintenance Plan. See How Your Commute Will Be Affected. (WCP, 5/19)


JOBS
Communications and Development Associate | Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing
Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. 
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. 
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Associate Director (Conservation Focus) | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations
D.C. PrEP for Women Project Coordinator | Washington AIDS Partnership 

Visit WRAG’s Job Board for the latest job openings in the region’s social sector.


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.

Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Boston has found a poetic way to beat the rainy day blues.

– Ciara