The government shutdown cost the local economy $1.6 billion

SHUTDOWN 
– The government shutdown cost the DC region more than $1.6 billion in lost economic output, according to George Mason University economist Stephen Fuller – and it may have damaged the region’s image as well. (WaPo, 1/26)

Civic leaders, business owners and other analysts believe the closing of federal agencies has harmed the government’s reputation as a reliable business partner and employer, and it has affected the morale of local federal workers and contractors who went unpaid. Additionally, there is concern that companies and employees will look for work in the private sector, and hurt investment in the region. “It should have been the best year of the decade,” Fuller said. “It’s going to struggle to fulfill its potential.”

– In her latest column, WRAG’s president Tamara Lucas Copeland recognizes the strain on nonprofit organizations that ramped up to meet the needs of furloughed workers and others affected by the shutdown – and that now have to continue providing critical safety net services, with diminished financial resources. For many of those organizations, the emergency isn’t over, even if the media moves on. (Daily, 1/28)

HOUSING
– A housing complex in DC was developed specifically for grandparents raising children, or “grandfamilies,” whose numbers have been growing in recent years. As of 2017, 2.8 million children were being raised by 2.6 million grandparents, including 7,250 kids in DC. (WaPo, 1/22)

Enterprise Community Partners will invest $250 million over five years to spur collaboration among health, housing, and community development sectors through the newly launched “Health Begins with Home” – a national initiative to harness the power of affordable homes to create healthier families and stronger communities. (Enterprise, 1/24)

EDUCATION
– Virginia educators are taking to the streets and marching to the state capitol today to protest a lack of money for public schools. (WaPo, 1/27)

– Johns Hopkins University plans to buy the Newseum building in DC, and will maintain the building’s uses for “education, discovery, [and] free and open debate.” (Curbed, 1/25)

CENSUS | Even if the citizenship question is not on the 2020 census, people still may be afraid to report their information. (CityLab, 1/22)

HEALTH | In an attempt to diversify the next generation of doctors and focus on the shortage of primary care physicians in underserved areas, free tuition is being offered to medical students at New York University. (NPQ, 1/25)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY | Here are seven ways Montgomery County is changing (GGW, 1/24)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Get Serious About Racial Healing (Chronicle, 1/22)


“Food Halls” are having a moment, and there’s a new Latin American food hall and market – La Cosecha – coming to DC this summer.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

DC’s Affordable Housing Crisis a Focus for Mayor Bowser

HOUSING | The lack of affordable housing in Washington, DC is affecting people at almost every income level. It is no longer considered a “poor people’s issue” – it’s a middle-class, senior citizen, young-worker, and family issue – and Mayor Muriel Bowser has focused her economic agenda on solving it(WaPo, 9/16):

Bowser is betting hundreds of millions of dollars and her entire economic agenda on the idea that her government can supply so many housing units sheltered from market forces that residents’ fear of being priced out will subside. During her campaign, Bowser made a commitment to put $100 million into the city’s affordable-housing fund every year. What does $100 million a year get you? For the five-year period through 2017, the year before Bowser goes up for reelection, the District is on pace to in total spend nearly $1 billion on an array of affordability initiatives. […]

At a citywide town hall meeting residents raised housing costs as their No. 1 concern – topping schools and crime. “That really was an inflection point,” said David Bowers, vice president of Enterprise Community Partners, [and WRAG board member]… “There were a lot of [advocates] that had been going for years asking for more money for housing. Then, at that point, people realized it really was a citywide concern.”

Related: Housing affordability in the Greater Washington region is a major priority of WRAG’s. WRAG is a co-convener of the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group, a collection of more than a dozen public and private sector regional leaders (including David Bowers, quoted in the story above) that is working to elevate the visibility of, and broaden support for bold, thoughtful, and collaborative solutions for the housing affordability challenge. And, in case you missed it, WRAG and Enterprise Community Loan Fund just passed the initial goal for Our Region, Your Investment, a unique impact investing initiative, with $7 million already raised to help preserve and produce affordable housing in the region.

RACE
– Sometimes, advocates are warned to be cautious about causing “racism fatigue.”  In her latest column, WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland turns that idea on its head. (Daily, 9/20)

– DC’s Racial Inequality Continues to Widen, Even as the City Sees Substantial Economic Growth (DCFPI, 9/15)

HEALTH/EQUITY | Until recently, researchers haven’t included African Americans as much as Caucasian or European descent populations in studies on diseases and medical trials. (NPR, 6/16)

EVENTS
  Join the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers for the upcoming Census 2020: Why Philanthropy Counts webinar on  October 18, 2016, 2:00 – 3:00 PM, for a conversation about why the census matters and the role that philanthropy can play in ensuring a fair and accurate count.

– WRAG Members: WRAG is an official partner for the 2016 Independent Sector conference here in DC this November 16-18. Register by September 22 to save an extra $500. Email Rebekah Seder for the discount code.

COMMUNITY
– The Center for Nonprofit Advancement’s 2016 #EXCELAward finalists have been announced, including WRAG’s own Tamara Copeland! Learn more about the finalists.

– Congratulations to Tobi Printz-Platnick, senior program officer at the Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, as well as WRAG’s own Gretchen Greiner-Lott for being accepted into Leadership Greater Washington’s Class of 2017!


Noooooo …. creepy clowns have now been spotted in Annapolis. – Buffy

Hispanics in Philanthropy Embracing Technology to Get Out the Vote

PHILANTHROPY/ELECTIONS | Citing immigration, health care and climate change as some of the many reasons to mobilize the Latino vote this election season, Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is partnering with numerous groups and embracing technology to engage voters – particularly millennials.

To create a future that’s equitable for their families and communities, Latinos need to engage in the democratic process and voice their opinions and needs. And, in this ever-more-digital world, and with so many millennial Latinos eligible to vote, it means that the nonprofits working to get out the vote need to use innovative strategies to engage voters in ways we’ve never done before.

Learn more about how HIP is embracing the digital age with an Hispanic Heritage campaign called #LatinosGiveTheirVote and the millennial focused crowdfunding platform, HIPGive.org. (NP Quarterly, 9/7)

HOUSING
– WRAG and the Enterprise Community Loan Fund share a very exciting announcement about Our Region, Your Investment, the impact investing initiative to address the housing crisis in our region. (Daily, 9/7)

– See all of DC’s new affordable housing in one map (GGW, 9/6)

WORKFORCE | Once a magnet for young professionals, the DC area is now attracting job seekers at a much slower pace. (WaPo, 9/5)

EDUCATION
– The Long-Term Consequences of Missing School (Atlantic, 9/6)

– A panel of education experts discuss evaluation and accountability in schools. This is the seventh, and last, installment in this series about school in a perfect world. Read previous entries on calendars, content, homework, teachers, classrooms, and classifications. (Atlantic, 9/4)

RACEThe Internet May Be as Segregated as a City (Atlantic, 9/6)

NONPROFITSShould Board Members of Large Nonprofits Be Paid? (NP Quarterly, 9/6)


Goodbye final weeks of summer … I already miss the fireflies – Buffy

Gentrification in DC Pushes Some Families Out

HOUSING | Large families with limited income are finding it challenging to obtain affordable housing in sections of DC experiencing redevelopment.

In a city with a critical shortage of affordable housing, the massive redevelopment off Rhode Island Avenue NE has become for some a symbol of the problems faced by those of modest means who are fearful of being displaced by monied newcomers in the District’s hot real estate market. Such fears are especially acute for large families that are overrepresented among the city’s poor.

Tenants’ advocates just filed a housing discrimination lawsuit at Brookland Manor. (WaPo, 8/30)

Related: Tamara Copeland’s blog yesterday discussing how structural racism may be playing out in the housing arena in DC, and that there are two sides to every story. (Daily, 8/29)

EDUCATION
– Education experts weigh in on the school calendar, and how best to “fix” it. (Atlantic, 8/29)

– Maryland Gov. Hogan will hold a press conference on Wednesday to discuss the school calendar and start dates for Maryland schools and potentially advocating they start after Labor Day. (WTOP, 8/30)

– Maryland and DC colleges get a nod for being some of the best colleges for adult learners.  (WaPo, 8/30)

DISTRICT | DC residents are not alone in their unsuccessful attempts for statehood. (Washingtonian, 8/26)

ENVIRONMENTMaryland fines coal power plants $1 million for polluting Potomac, Patuxent rivers (Baltimore Sun, 8/29)

TRANSIT
– Better economy, cheaper gas = increase in traffic deaths (WaPo, 8/29)

– Japan will give $2 million for a high-speed train feasibility study that will connect Washington and Baltimore. (WBJ, 8/25)

CIVIL RIGHTSJustice Dept. focuses on police treatment of mentally ill (WTOP, 8/29)

PHILANTHROPY | DC invests $1 million in new charity start-up focused on allowing people to donate online in new and more convenient ways. (WBJ, 8/29)

NONPROFITSThe New Overtime Rules Spotlight a Systemic Problem for Nonprofits (NP Quarterly, 8/29)


“Time is a precious thing. Never waste it.” RIP Gene Wilder – Buffy

Huge Response to New National Museum of African American History and Culture in DC

CULTURE | There’s an overwhelming demand for tickets to visit the new National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall which opens on September 24. All 28,500 opening weekend tickets were gone within an hour after they became available this past Saturday. The only tickets now available to reserve are for weekdays in October.

Twelve exhibitions with nearly 3,000 items will be available to view in the 85,000-square-foot space that tells the story of African American life, history and culture. (WaPo, 8/28)

To make the museum possible, more than $273 million was contributed from private donors, including the foundations of Oprah Winfrey, Bill and Melinda Gates, Shonda Rhimes, BET founder Robert L. Johnson and Michael Jordan.

POVERTY | I Am: The Strength, Value and Resilience of TANF Families is a new video made by TANF advocates and families in DC and supported by the Consumer Health Foundation.

Related: Protecting TANF as a lifeline (Daily, 3/16)

HOUSING
– WRAG’s Tamara Copeland stresses that every family deserves quality housing that they can afford as she highlights how structural racism may be playing out out in the housing arena in DC, and that there are two sides to every story. (Daily, 8/29)

 The biggest beneficiaries of housing subsidies? The wealthy. (GGW, 8/26)

EDUCATION
– School starts today in Montgomery County, which has seen huge growth in student enrollment the last eight years. (WaPo, 8/29)

– The Head Start program in Prince George’s County will now be run by a group based in Denver. (WTOP, 8/29)

ECONOMY | The Urban Institute provides an overview on how state economic agencies operate. (Urban Institute, 7/27)

RACE | The social network Next Door, used around the country, is facing criticism for posts that border on racial profiling. (WaPo, 8/29)

MILLENNIALSCorporate Ethics In The Era Of Millennials (NPR, 8/24)

NONPROFITS
The Plight of the Overworked Nonprofit Employee (The Atlantic, 8/24)

– Studies Examine Why People Give Differently Than They Invest (CP, 8/23)


Interesting … who knew you could remove all political posts from your Facebook feed? – Buffy

Northern Virginia Health Foundation Reflects on 10 Years

HEALTH
– As they reflect on the work of the Northern Virginia Health Foundation the last decade, Foundation President and CEO Patricia N. Mathews and Board Chair Lisa G. Kaplowitz believe the health care safety net in the region has become stronger. And, they share some lessons learned:

As we take a moment to reflect on the occasion of our 10th anniversary, there is so much that we have learned. But three lessons stand apart:

1. Providing general operating support is essential.
2. Grantmaking is important, but it isn’t enough.
3. Working in partnership with grantees is required.

Learn more by reading their 10th anniversary annual report. (NoVAFH, 8/23)

– Medicaid to Pay for Repellent in Virginia to Ward Off Zika (WTOP, 8/24)

– Faith Nonprofits Sue Over Health Coverage for Transgender People (CP, 8/24)

RACIAL JUSTICE/EQUITY
– Tamara Copeland writes about Tackling Racial Justice: Why, How and So What?  for the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (Responsive Philanthropy Blog, Summer 2016)

– Philanthropy’s infrastructure is building a new philanthropic network that will, among other things, address racial equity, diversity, and inclusion in philanthropy – with the Forum of Regional Association’s of Grantmakers leading the charge. Washington Grantmakers is a member of the Forum, and Tamara Copeland recently sat on a Racial Equity panel at the July Annual Conference, where she shared WRAG’s “Putting Racism on the Table” work.

ECONOMY | The Plight Of The White Working Class Isn’t Economic, It’s Cultural (The Federalist, 8/17)

REGION
– Virginia Could be Facing Much Bigger Budget Shortfall than Expected (WaPo, 8/24)

– DC residents are working harder to own a house than others around the country. (WaPo, 8/25)

 DC sets a record with more than 2 million foreign tourists in 2015. (WTOP, 8/24)

NONPROFITS Nonprofit Governance and the Power of Things – Nonprofit boards often have a mix of personalities. This useful and classic article examines boardroom behavior. (NP Quarterly, 8/12/15)

PHILANTHROPY
– How to help those impacted by the earthquake in Italy. (Mashable, 8/25)

– More Philanthropists Should Think Like Venture Capitalists (Forbes, 8/17)


Jobs

Analyst | Arabella Advisors
Operations Associate | ACT for Alexandria
Grants Coordinator | City of Takoma Park
Development Associate | Washington Area Women’s Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar – September 2016
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to seder@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Ooooh, it just feels wrong to want the Bacon Donutwich – doesn’t it? I’m going to go for it. – Buffy

Watch Putting Racism on the Table | A Case Study: Mass Incarceration

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG
The fourth video in the Putting Racism on the Table series is now live! The video features James Bell, J.D., founder and executive director of the W. Haywood Burns Institute, discussing mass incarceration and how structural racism, white privilege, and implicit bias coalesce in the criminal justice system. After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

HOUSING/PHILANTHROPY | Noting the perceived roadblocks to affordable home ownership for low-income residents, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland calls for philanthropy to seed an X Prize to spur innovation in the housing field. (Daily, 6/1)

HOMELESSNESS/DISTRICT | The D.C. Council has unanimously passed a revised version of Mayor Muriel Bowser’s homeless shelter plan. (WCP, 5/31)

HEALTH
– One paragraph that puts the white-black life expectancy gap in (horrifying) context (Vox, 5/31)

Related: Dr. David Williams, quoted in the above article, provided the keynote speech at WRAG’s 2015 Annual Meeting in a presentation titled, “The House that Racism Built.” You can view his presentation here.

– Preliminary numbers compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 2015 show a reversal in a years-long decline in American death rates. A rise in deaths from Alzheimer’s disease, drug use, firearms, hypertension and stroke, injuries, and suicides are among reasons for the uptick. (WaPo, 6/1)

EDUCATION/EQUITY Reports: Homeless, foster kids face enormous hurdles in trying to get to college (WaPo, 6/1)


Could you have taken home the top prize in the recent National Geographic Bee’s final round? 

-Ciara