Friday roundup – March 21 through March 25, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Reflections on implicit bias were shared by Board Chair Missy Young and lead staffer Dara Johnson from the Horning Family Fund. (Daily 3/24)

– The Consumer Health Foundation‘s Kendra Allen interviewed Sequnely Gray, Community Engagement Coordinator for So Others Might Eat and a TANF recipient, about her experience advocating for families on TANF and the impact of benefit time limits. (CHF, 3/21)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/REGION
– A new report found significant racial disparities in the acceptance rates among selective academic programs at public schools in Montgomery County. (WaPo, 3/22)

 In Loudoun County, a proposal that would concentrate mostly low-income, majority Hispanic students into two schools is evoking memories of “separate but equal” policies of the past. (WaPo, 3/20) 

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
–  Grantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, released a supplement on health equity innovations, published with the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016)

–  OpinionThe color of heroin addiction — why war then, treatment now? (WaPo, 3/23)

THIS WEEK IN CSR
 The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Are you #TeamPancakes or #TeamWaffles? Personally, I found both to be far too filling.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – November 9 through November 13, 2015

THIS WEEK IN CSR/VETERANS
– Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, shared how his organization supports the Veterans Empowerment Movement. (American Express, 11/9)

THIS WEEK IN FOOD/EDUCATION
– Schools in the region, particularly in Prince George’s County, are getting their hands dirty by taking the classroom experience outdoors in learning gardens. (WTOP, 11/10)

– Though research has often suggested that most low-income individuals find it difficult to maintain healthy nutritional habits because of food deserts, recent studies say poor eating habits have less to do with proximity and much more to do with income. (Atlantic, 11/9)

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS & HUMANITIES
– The Nonprofit Finance Fund released two reports – one for grantmakers and another for arts organizations – summarizing lessons learned about capitalization in the arts sector. (NFF, 10/2015)

– Nonprofit theaters are attracting more donors, but audiences keep shrinking, report says (LA Times, 11/5)

 Harvard Medical School joins an emerging trend among institutions encouraging their students to take part in arts and humanities courses in order to improve their skills in empathy and observation. (Boston Globe, 11/2)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Rejoice, cat owners! As it turns out, your cat is unlikely sitting at home plotting your demise – research be darned.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – October 26 through October 30, 2015

THIS WEEK IN YOUTH
– The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region released a new report on the perspectives of black and African American youth in Montgomery County, and offered recommendations for the school system and community to improve outcomes. (WaPo, 10/22)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTHCARE
– The Association of American Medical Colleges released a report that found that, although more black men have graduated from college over the last few decades, there were fewer black men in medical school in 2014 than in 1978. Newly released numbers for 2015, however, show a modest gain in enrollment since 2014. (WAMU, 10/24)

– A number of hospitals in D.C. are feeling the strain of patients who have been abandoned in their care. Some have banned together to create a task force to better address the challenges. (WBJ, 10/27)

Pediatricians are being encouraged to look further into the socioeconomic circumstances of their patient’s families, as 14 percent of American households are considered food insecure. (Atlantic, 10/26)

THIS WEEK IN CSR
– Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, shared how his company works to minimize its operational impact on the environment. (American Express, 10/26)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Sometimes, you can’t rely on online reviews.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – September 7 through September 11, 2015

THIS WEEK IN CSR
– The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia highlights the work of local companies supporting the community through employee engagement activities and CSR programs that benefit the region in their second issue of GOOD Business. (CFNV, 8/27)

– Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and lead faculty member for the Institute for CSR, discussed income inequalities in the social profit sector. (American Express, 9/8)

THIS WEEK IN POVERTY
– Opinion: A writer argues that much more philanthropic aid goes toward poor minorities in cities than poor whites in rural areas, despite data that four in 10 poor Americans are white. (Chronicle, 9/3)

Why Boosting Poor Children’s Vocabulary is Important for Public Health (Atlantic, 9/7)

THIS WEEK IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING/REGION
– Most of the District’s new housing is located in the center of the city, creating a situation where almost all new housing is in high-rise apartments that most residents and potential residents cannot afford. (GGW, 9/9)

–  Candidates for Arlington County Board recently fielded questions around plans to bring more affordable housing to the area. (ARLnow, 9/9)

– Extreme rent hikes in one longstanding apartment property in Montgomery County, Maryland highlight the much larger issue of affordable housing getting further out of reach for less affluent residents. (WaPo, 9/5)


While early mornings are far from being my favorite time of day, these sounds of daybreak from around the world are no less amusing.

– Ciara

 

Friday roundup – Feb. 16 through Feb. 20, 2015

THIS WEEK IN CSR
– Rachel Tappis, the associate director of community impact for The Advisory Board Company, gave us some insight into what she has learned so far as a participant in the Institute for Corporate Social Responsibility, and why she can’t wait for the next session. (Daily, 2/19)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– The Washington Business Journal features a profile of each of this year’s Minority Business Leader Awards honorees. Congratulations to Rosie Allen-Herring of United Way of the National Capital Area, Terri Copeland of PNC, and WRAG Board member, Debbi Jarvis of Pepco, on a well-deserved honor! (WBJ, 2/20)

– In her latest post, WRAG president Tamara Copeland shared some great news concerning the Community Wealth Building Initiative (Daily, 2/18)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
High-poverty schools need better teachers, but getting them there won’t be easy (GGW, 2/20)

– A new map was released showing the changes in reading proficiency for third graders in the District from 2007-2014 (WCP, 2/19)

– Upon his departure from Montgomery County Public Schools, former Superintendent Joshua Starr gave his thoughts on his time with the district in this exit interview. (WAMU, 2/15)

THIS WEEK IN TRANSIT
Metro failed to notify fire officials that radio alarms weren’t working (WaPo, 2/19)

THIS WEEK IN THE ENVIRONMENT
– A government advisory committee has developed new recommendations for American diets that includes eating less processed and red meats to reduce the negative impact on the environment. The Department of Health and Human Services and the Agriculture Department may use the recommendations to inform the next version of their Dietary Guidelines later in the year. (WaPo, 2/19)

Maryland Environmentalists Want to Get Serious About Rising Sea Levels (WAMU, 2/19)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK
Brown Bag Discussion: Financial Capability, Financial Literacy, and Economic Asset Building (WRAG members)
Monday, February 23, 2015  12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Funders’ Roundtable of Montgomery County: Investing in Our Neighbors With Special Needs from Cradle to Career (The Funders’ Roundtable is a networking group exclusively for donors, foundations, and companies interested in giving in Montgomery County, MD)
Thursday, February 26, 2015  12:00 PM – 2:00 PM


Find out who police in one city have issued a warrant for in connection with the cold weather. 

– Ciara

 

Friday roundup – Jan. 5 through Jan. 9, 2015

THIS WEEK IN POVERTY/REGION
Poverty continues to increase and move into suburban areas across the country and in the region. Though there are some success stories in addressing the great need for assistance for low-income residents in these areas, help is slow-moving and can prove difficult for residents to navigate. (The Atlantic, 1/7)

Some regions have begun to address the problems created by suburban poverty, but they’re finding the work is slow going.

After all, suburbs are often much more spread out than cities, and organization has to be done at a county-wide or multi-county level. To reach the same number of low-income families that an organization might once have reached in one urban neighborhood, groups have to work across counties or regions. It can be difficult to change how programs are administered. The federal government spends $82 billion to fight poverty, but it’s funneled through 81 programs and 10 different agencies.

But some regions are succeeding. Montgomery County, Maryland, for instance, established a network to reach low-income residents who might not have been aware of the benefits available to them, with volunteers knocking on far-flung suburban doors to check in on residents […].

THIS WEEK IN CSR
– WRAG’S Director of Corporate Strategy, Katy Moore, shared her prescription for professional-development-deficiency for corporate social responsibility professionals in need. (Volunteer Match, 12/18)

THIS WEEK IN THE ENVIRONMENT
– Advocates are steadily working toward a cleaner, swimmable Anacostia River, but understand it won’t come easy. (WaPo, 1/4)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– As part of a new partnership between the state of Maryland and Microsoft, 870,000 public school students in the state will get free Microsoft Office 365 software. Maryland is the first state to embark on such a partnership. (WaPo, 1/9)

– Today, President Obama will announce a new plan that will assist adults with attending two-year community college for free and will address growing income inequality. (NYT, 1/9)

A ‘Sizable Decrease’ In Those Passing the GED (NPR, 1/9)

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT
– The U.S. Olympic Committee has chosen Boston over D.C., Los Angeles, and San Francisco as the city that will go on to vie to host the 2024 Olympics. (WaPo, 1/8)

THIS WEEK IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– We got a glimpse at the newest appointees to D.C’s housing and development team. (WCP, 1/5)

– D.C. may soon see an uptick in foreclosures. Housing advocates say that’s a good thing (WaPo, 1/8)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK
Healthy Communities Working Group: January Meeting (WRAG members)
Monday, January 12, 2015  12:00PM – 2:00PM

CEO Coffee & Conversation: Bringing National Funders into the Region (Rescheduled, for WRAG member CEOs)
Wednesday, January 14, 2015  9:00AM – 10:30AM


Check out this list of America’s Top 25 Best-Performing Large Cities. Something’s missing!

– Ciara

Friday roundup – Dec. 8 through Dec. 12, 2014

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Congratulations to Nicky Goren, president and CEO at the Meyer Foundation, for being named one of Washington Business Journal’s Most Admired CEOs in the CEO of the Year Awards!

Nicky Goren is one of those quiet leaders, the kind who doesn’t burst upon the scene but who gradually, and powerfully, makes her presence felt as she effects change. She did that during her tenure at the Washington Area Women’s Foundation, where she led the philanthropic group’s growth and efforts since 2010. But 2014 saw the beginning of a new chapter as she rose to the top of hundreds of other applicants and assumed the role of president and CEO of the Meyer Foundation, one of the region’s largest and most philanthropic foundations. Goren succeeds longtime regional leader Julie Rogers, who retired after 28 years at the helm. Goren’s new challenge is a vital one to our region, given Meyer’s importance to both the nonprofit sector and the community as a whole.

Kim Horn, of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Mid Atlantic States, Inc. is also a recipient of the big honor!

– The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, Raise DC’s Youth Employment Change Network, and the DC Workforce Investment Council are undertaking a survey of local funders to begin to map investments in youth workforce development programming. The completed map will then illustrate the fullest possible scope of the local youth workforce development system, mapping providers, funding levels, types of services offered, and the overall number of youth served through these programs. Funders of youth services in the District can find more information and access the survey.

– WRAG’s Tamara Copeland, Celeste James of Kaiser Permanente, and Leanne Posko of Capital One appeared on NBC4’s Viewpoint and discussed the impact of philanthropy in our region, funders’ priorities and practices, and some of the other findings detailed in the 2014 edition of Our Region, Our Giving. You can view the full Viewpoint episode here.

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS
– The holidays lend themselves to great displays of public art across the region. A number of eye-catching exhibits are currently up, including one by the Floating Lab Collective at Washington Harbour, that uses a number of tiny houses to make up a 10-foot tall tree and serves as a “sculptural reflection of the housing crisis.” (WaPo, 12/11)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Montgomery County Schools and the county council prepared to spar over school budget spending. The debates over spending are expecting to continue at least until next spring. (WAMU, 12/9)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION
Arlingtonians grapple with costs, revenue in annual budget hearing (WaPo, 12/10)

THIS WEEK IN CSR 
– A Fast Company op-ed writer helps us understand why corporate social responsibility should be more than just a fad – and can be if CSR is baked into management practices through “positive business” principles. (FC, 12/8)

4 ways to boost employee volunteerism (WBJ, 12/11)


Each new year seems to bring about new buzzwords that permeate the foundation and nonprofit world and spread like wildfire. Here’s a list of buzzwords you may be hearing a lot in 2015.

– Ciara