Child care costs are on the rise, while many providers are struggling to make ends meet

CHILD CARE | As child care costs continue to rise, many providers are still among the lowest-paid workers in the country, while area parents are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation. (WAMU, 5/29)

In DC, the median hourly wage for childcare workers was $14.33 in 2017. In Maryland, it was $11.29. And in Virginia, it was $9.82 … This may come as a surprise to area parents, who are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation — sometimes thousands of dollars a month. [According to] Lea Austin, co-director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, those costs may not be high enough to provide what’s needed. Austin says that after paying for the essentials of running a child care center — things like rent, utilities and supplies — there’s little money left for the actual people who are doing the work, many of whom are women, often women of color.

CENSUS | In today’s Daily WRAG, the co-chairs of WRAG’s Census 2020 Working Group, Levina Kim (United Way of the National Capital Area), Ria Pugeda (Consumer Health Foundation), and Terri Wright (Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation), explain the urgency around the 2020 Census and call on their philanthropic colleagues to invest to support outreach, education, and assistance for those communities most at risk of being undercounted in the census. (Daily, 5/30)

HOUSING | How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For blue-collar and service workers in major cities – like Washington, DC – the affordable housing crisis hits harder. (CityLab, 5/21)

EDUCATION
– Arlington Public Schools has reached a settlement with the US Department of Justice to improve services for English-learning students over the next three years, after the Justice Department found multiple compliance issues with the English Learner programs and practices.  (WAMU, 5/21)

– Governor Hogan has vetoed a bill that would have allowed more undocumented immigrants to pay in-state college tuition. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/24)

IMMIGRATION | As part of the county’s newly approved $5.8 billion operating budget, the Montgomery County Council has allocated $14.5 million for 335 individual grants to community nonprofits, the largest share of which is going toward immigration assistance programs. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/29)

CULTURE | DC’s independent, black-owned bookstores are thriving. But will high taxes do them in? (GGWash, 5/29)

ENVIRONMENT | The Tidal Basin Is One Of America’s ‘Most Endangered Places’ (WAMU, 5/30)

TRANSITDo more roads mean less traffic? That’s the question Maryland and Virginia are being asked as the Capital Beltway widening proposal is discussed. (WAMU, 5/29)

ECONOMY | National parks tourism brought over $1.5B in benefits to DC area (WTOP, 5/28)

PHILANTHROPY | The Butterfly Effect: Tracking the Growth of Women’s Funds (Philanthropy Women, 5/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation – New!
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC – New!
Foundation Director | Venable LLP – New!
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Sparkling wine from a DC food truck? Yes, please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday!

– Buffy

Is the solution to the District’s housing crisis to invest in the middle class?

HOUSING | A strategy to produce and preserve workforce housing is gaining support among elected officials and developers to address the affordable housing shortage in the District. (WAMU, 5/2)

In her proposed 2020 budget, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has called for the creation of an unprecedented $20 million “workforce housing” fund that would subsidize homes affordable to middle-income professionals like teachers, social workers, and first responders… Many developers applaud the mayor’s workforce fund, saying it will help incentivize builders to construct and preserve housing that isn’t market-rate or “luxury.” Businesses tend to like it, too, because they want to be where the workforce lives. But the applause is countered by critics who say the mayor should instead invest that $20 million in low-income housing — particularly public housing, an estimated third of which is currently uninhabitable due to hazardous conditions.

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County may become the first jurisdiction in the country to use a public-private partnership to build and maintain several of its public schools, to speed up construction and decrease debt. (WaPo, 5/5)

LGBTQIA+ | Transgender teens in schools with bathroom restrictions are at higher risk of sexual assault, study says (CNN, 5/6)

WORKFORCE
– This co-working space doubles as a child care center. (WAMU, 5/6)

– Participants in a District workforce development program have not received the training they expected and are still unemployed. (CP, 5/2)

PRISON REFORM
– The District is looking into how it might obtain local control over the parole system again. (DCist, 5/1)

Maryland just banned placing pregnant inmates in solitary confinement. Yes, that was apparently happening. (WaPo, 5/1)

VIRGINIA | Fairfax board adopts budget with more for affordable housing, environment (WaPo, 3/7)

DISTRICT | The DC Inspector General says the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs has failed to track and collect on fines from businesses, developers and landlords who break the rules. (WAMU, 3/7)

COMMUNITY | Congrats to Natalie Madeira Cofield, founder & CEO of Walker’s Legacy and the Walker’s Legacy Foundation, for being named the Women in Business Champion of the Year by the DC Chamber of Commerce. (Walker’s Legacy Foundation is a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG.)

PHILANTHROPY | New CEO at Council on Foundations Pledges Greater Accountability (Chronicle, 5/1)


Sleep in a ‘Glamping Globe’ on the roof of the Watergate? Yes please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy